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C-C Yang, S-C Kang

BIM Navigation with Hand-Based Gesture Control on Sites

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Series: w78:2014 (browse)
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Chao L C

Simulation of construction operation with direct inputs of physical factors

Abstract: The deterministic approach to estimating the production rate of a construction operation assumes constant midpoint physical attributes without addressing the effect of randomness of job conditions. On the other hand, most simulation models bypass physical factors and rely on secondorder inputs of probability distributions of task times, the judgements of which have been cited as difficult for users to make. This paper presents an alternative approach to production estimation, based on simulating directly the effects of changing job factors on task times, while addressing the probabilistic nature of construction. The neural network model is used as the computing mechanism for determining the cycle times of the equipment in given conditions and provides the basis for estimation. The obtained times are then fed directly into a discrete-event simulation model to simulate the process and establish the production capacity of the system as constrained by first-order factors. The approach is illustrated using a hypothetical excavating and hauling operation while the object-oriented programming technique is used to implement the computing procedure.

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Full text: content.pdf (72,259 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:1999 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.analysis (0.027295) class.software development (0.021146) class.software-machine (0.005241)
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Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by the Research Press of the National Research Council of Canada. The support of the editors, particularly Dr. Dana Vanier, is gratefully appreciated.


Ciftcioglu O, Durmisevic S, Sariyildiz S

Soft computing in construction information technology

Abstract: Purpose: With this paper a data driven model of knowledge representation for use in construction information technology (CIT) is introduced as a novel implementation and it is effectively implemented by artificial intelligence methods. Although for CIT knowledge base systems as a general framework is available where the user can place the information. Such systems are eventually mere data warehouses or in a more sophisticated form they are decision support systems in the form of rule based expert systems. However, in the case of a framework structure to organise the knowledge base is difficult and cumbersome task to establish an effective product. In the case expert systems, the inference is deductive and therefore the effectiveness of the system is limited to the prescribed rules. Therefore in place of high level data base management software like Prolog ©, the integration of new computational information processing methods and technologies into CIT would be much informative and therefore they are much effective and finally desirable. From the viewpoint of computation, CIT the data are rather soft requiring special methods and techniques to deal with. In this respect, computational intelligence is one of the emerging technologies, which provides CIT with ample possibilities and techniques for the enhancement of CIT products. Computational intelligence is a part of artificial intelligence (AI) and can be defined as a branch of soft computing methodologies including Expert Systems, Fuzzy Logic, Artificial Neural Networks and Evolutionary Computation. Methodology: For the CIT data soft computing methods are invoked. Soft Computing is an emerging approach to computing which parallels the remarkable ability of the human mind to reason and learn in an environment of uncertainty and imprecision. In plain terms, it is the processing of uncertain information with the methods, methodologies, and paradigms of artificial NN, fuzzy logic and evolutionary algorithms. The equivalence of neural networks and fuzzy logic applications is well established. However, the effectiveness of either method is still dependent on the application itself. Each method has its strong merits. However, in general, best performance is obtained when both methods are used in hybrid form. Especially neural system can cope with complex systems while it is relatively difficult for fuzzy systems. On the contrary, it is easier to deal with linguistic variables by fuzzy systems. Such a hybrid model is implemented in the knowledge model accomplished. Results: A novel concept of soft computing in CIT is introduced using actual building design data for design evaluation. The knowledge base contains all the local and global information and their inherent relationships among themselves. The knowledge representation is performed by means of a series of fuzzy systems having their both fuzzy input space and output space. The associations between the spaces are established by learning techniques of AI using the data at hand. Such an 'intelligent' knowledge base can make inference resulting in 'intelligent' due outcomes, which are not explicitly coded, in advance. In other words this is an inductive and computational inference for decision-making compared to conventional knowledge base systems where inference is deductive prescribed by rules. Conclusions: The soft computing in CIT is an important step for processing the relevant effectively and efficiently. In this respect, the paper describes ongoing advanced research and its verifications by actual data at hand.

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Full text: content.pdf (204,669 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2001 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.analysis (0.064489) class.synthesis (0.025964) class.deployment (0.019220)
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Permission to reproduce these documents have been graciously provided by CSIR Building and Construction Technology. The assistance of the editors, Mr. Gustav Coetzee and Mr. Frances Boshoff, is gratefully appreciated.


Costa F

The S:ITEC model: An integrated system of treatment of data and knowledge in construction

Abstract: Recently, in the field of Computer Aided Design (CAD), notable efforts have been made with theoretical results largely unproven due mainly to the difficulties of the large scale production required. On the other hand, other applications of an excessively practical nature have been developed which, however, present a high degree of difficulty in bringing about their integration. In the first case we would include, for example, representational Models and Classification Systems andin the second case the various CAD systems as well as the partial integration work carried out although often at a high level of specialization. This work means that, although each time we get nearer to reaching the goal where all these efforts would coincide, no concrete systemadaptable to the majority of models proposed has really yet been put forward or used for the various applications developed. A system whichwould meet these needs must do so in a single, integral manner (whicheven could be standardized in the most universal way possible) so that finally-the user could at any moment control in real time each and every one of the various decisions which must be taken along the difficult design path, understood as the process of conception. In order to achieve these objectives, what becomes fundamental is the adequate treatment of the various methods and elements on which we depend, in order to carry out our task so that, in some way or other, we can simplifyand reduce them to two single elements: Data and Knowledge. While it is certain that in the first case there is almost complete coincidenceamong most of the existing proposals in various parts of the world, in the second case there exists a wide range of approaches as well as arelative lack of concretion. The SITEC model (Integrated System for Treatment of Construction Elements), a research project being developedby the Catalan Institute of Construction Technology, is shown to be capable of providing the necessary integrat

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Full text: content.pdf (1,001,313 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:1992 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.synthesis (0.028882) class.impact (0.010540) class.analysis (0.008722)
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Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by Research Press of the National Research Council of Canada. The support of the editor, Dr. Dana Vanier, is gratefully appreciated.


Daum S,Borrmann A

Checking spatio-semantic consistency of building information models by means of a query language

Abstract: One of the characteristic features of object-based Building Information Models is the close integration of geometric and semantic information into one model. This concept is thoroughly implemented by the Industry Foundation Classes (IFC), a comprehensive data model designed to provide a sound foundation for complex data exchange scenarios. Besides the provision of a large variety of data types for capturing the semantics of building elements and spaces, the IFC also makes it possible to define relationships between building elements and/or spaces, respectively. In particular, a spatial aggregation hierarchy can be modeled by successively applying the relationship IfcRelAggregates to space objects. However, no validation options currently exist to check whether the semantically defined aggregation hierarchy complies with the geometric setup of the individual spaces and building elements. This lack of consistency between the semantic and the geometric part of the BIM model may lead to serious data interpretation errors at the receiving end. To prevent this, we propose a new method for validating spatio-semantic consistency based on the usage of the Query Language for Building Information Models (QL4BIM) which on the one hand provides a means of accessing the IFC object model and on the other hand provides high-level spatial operators, such as Disjoint, Touching and Containing. The formulation of corresponding queries makes it possible to verify the spatio-semantic consistency of the IFC model. The paper discusses application scenarios and provides a number of relevant examples.

Keywords: BIM,IFC,Topology,Validation,Consistency,Spatial Relationships

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Series: convr:2013 (browse)
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De Grassi M, Giretti A, Caneparo L, Mecca S

Teaching construction in the virtual university: the WINDS project

Abstract: "This paper introduces some of the Information Technology solutions adopted in Web based INtelligent Design Support (WINDS) to support education in A/E/C design. The WINDS project WINDS is an EC-funded project in the 5th Framework, Information Society Technologies programme, Flexible University key action. WINDS is divided into two actions: ·The research technology action is going to implement a learning environment integrating an intelligent tutoring system, a computer instruction management system and a set of co-operative supporting tools. ·The development action is going to build a large knowledge base supporting Architecture and Civil Engineering Design Courses and to experiment a comprehensive Virtual School of Architecture and Engineering Design. During the third year of the project, more than 400 students all over Europe will attend the Virtual School. During the next three years the WINDS project will span a total effort of about 150 man-years from 28 partners of 10 European countries. The missions of the WINDS project are: Advanced Methodologies in Design Education. WINDS drives a breakdown with conventional models in design education, i.e. classroom or distance education. WINDS implements a problem oriented knowledge transfer methodology following Roger Schank’s Goal Based Scenario (GBS) pedagogical methodology. GBS encourages the learning of both skills and cases, and fosters creative problem solving. Multidisciplinary Design Education. Design requires creative synthesis and open-end problem definition at the intersection of several disciplines. WINDS experiments a valuable integration of multidisciplinary design knowledge and expertise to produce a high level standard of education. Innovative Representation, Delivery and Access to Construction Education. WINDS delivers individual education customisation by allowing the learner access through the Internet to a wide range of on-line courses and structured learning objects by means of personally tailored learning strategies. WINDS promotes the 3W paradigm: learn What you need, Where you want, When you require. Construction Practice. Construction industry is a repository of ""best practices"" and knowledge that the WINDS will profit. WINDS system benefits the ISO10303 and IFC standards to acquire knowledge of the construction process directly in digital format. On the other hand, WINDS reengineers the knowledge in up-to-date courses, educational services, which the industries can use to provide just-in-time rather than in-advance learning. WINDS IT Solutions The missions of the WINDS project state many challenging requirements both in knowledge and system architecture. Many of the solutions adopted in these fields are innovative; others are evolution of existing technologies. This paper focuses on the integration of this set of state-of-the-art technologies in an advanced and functionally sound Computer Aided Instruction system for A/E/C Design. In particular the paper deals with the following aspects: Standard Learning Technology Architecture The WINDS system relies on the in progress IEEE 1484.1 Learning Technology Standard Architecture. According to this standard the system consists of two data stores, the Knowledge Library and the Record Database, and four process: System Coach, Delivery, Evaluation and the Learner. WINDS implements the Knowledge Library into a three-tier architecture: 1.Learning Objects: ·Learning Units are collections of text and multimedia data. ·Models are represented in either IFC or STEP formats. ·Cases are sets of Learning Units and Models. Cases are noteworthy stories, which describes solutions, integrate technical detail, contain relevant design failures etc. 2.Indexes refer to the process in which the identification of relevant topics in design cases and learning units takes place. Indexing process creates structures of Learning Objects for course management, profile planning procedures and reasoning processes. 3.Courses are taxonomies of either Learning Units or a design task and Course Units. Knowledge Representation WINDS demonstrates that it is possible and valuable to integrate a widespread design expertise so that it can be effectively used to produce a high level standard of education. To this aim WINDS gathers area knowledge, design skills and expertise under the umbrellas of common knowledge representation structures and unambiguous semantics. Cases are one of the most valuable means for the representation of design expertise. A Case is a set of Learning Units and Product Models. Cases are noteworthy stories, which describe solutions, integrate technical details, contain relevant design failures, etc. Knowledge Integration Indexes are a medium among different kind of knowledge: they implement networks for navigation and access to disparate documents: HTML, video, images, CAD and product models (STEP or IFC). Concept indexes link learning topics to learning objects and group them into competencies. Index relationships are the base of the WINDS reasoning processes, and provide the foundation for system coaching functions, which proactively suggest strategies, solutions, examples and avoids students’ design deadlock. Knowledge Distribution To support the data stores and the process among the partners in 10 countries efficiently, WINDS implements an object oriented client/server as COM objects. Behind the DCOM components there is the Dynamic Kernel, which dynamically embodies and maintains data stores and process. Components of the Knowledge Library can reside on several servers across the Internet. This provides for distributed transactions, e.g. a change in one Learning Object affects the Knowledge Library spread across several servers in different countries. Learning objects implemented as COM objects can wrap ownership data. Clear and univocal definition of ownerships rights enables Universities, in collaboration with telecommunication and publisher companies, to act as “education brokers”. Brokerage in education and training is an innovative paradigm to provide just-in-time and personally customised value added learning knowledge."

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Full text: content.pdf (417,738 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2000 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.education (0.088602) class.deployment (0.042591) class.bestPractise (0.035370)
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Permission to reproduce these documents have been graciously provided by Icelandic Building Research Institute. The assistance of the editor, Mr. Gudni Gudnason, is gratefully appreciated


Dickinson S J, Bradshow A

Validation and certification of civil engineering structural design sofware

Abstract: The strive for efficiency and increased productivity within the building construction industry has highlighted the need for assurance of the validity of structural design software. Currently, building structures are designed using unvalidated computer software which means that, for reasons of possible litigation, design checks must be carried out by hand calculation. The need for checking and rechecking at all stages of design and subsequent design authorisation by town planning departments means that the process is generally long winded and expensive. This paper outlines a proposed scheme for the validation, certification and subsequent monitoring and recertification of such software through a specially set up software validation agency.

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Series: ecce:1997 (browse)
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E Santos, E Toledo Santos

Design Coordination with Building Information Modelling – BIM: A Case Study

Abstract: Despite some isolated initiatives using 3D CAD or BIM (Building Information Modeling) tools, project processes in the Brazilian AEC industry are still essentially developed using 2D technology, especially in the design development phases. There is evidence in the literature that 2D representations are prone to difficult-to-detect design errors and representation mistakes. BIM is an emerging paradigm based on object oriented, parameterized 3D CAD tools that promises an even better performance in design coordination processes than standard 3D CAD. This work aims to identify the potential for using BIM tools in the design coordination process as a more effective alternative to two-dimensional methods (abstraction and overlaying of drawings for interference checks and clash detection among different design disciplines). The research was based on the execution of a case study involving a complex residential building. Its design was developed as usual, with 2D CAD, as was its coordination process, by professional firms hired by the owner. Afterwards, using the same documents provided to the coordination firm, the first author independently developed the architectural, structural, plumbing, and HVAC BIM models for the standard floor plan of the building, simulating both the Schematic Design (SD) and the Design Development (DD) phases. During and after this process, detected interferences and information errors or omissions were documented in order to be compared with those reported in the traditional process of design coordination. The comparative analysis of both reports in this case study showed that the methodology with BIM detected 75% more design interferences and inconsistencies than the 2D-CAD supported method. This was partly due to the easier visualization of the virtual model, and to the software features for automating interference checks. On the other hand, the analysis of the interferences found in both processes demonstrated that the modeling procedure alone can affect design perception and evaluation, allowing the detection of a greater number of incompatibilities during the process.

Keywords: Design Coordination, BIM, Clash Detection, Case study

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Full text: content.pdf (458,394 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2011 (browse)
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Earl M

A design automation paradox

Abstract: There seems to be a 'tyranny' of predefined purpose in some highly automated CAD products. For example, a CAD product for architects may provide 'high level" commands for trimming 'walls'. However, unless the 'wall' types conform to a particular topology, they can not be trimmed. On the other hand , there are 'low level' commands which can be used to trim more general types of graphic entities. However, unless the graphic entities are tediously decomposed into primitive elements, such as line segments and arcs, they also can not be trimmed. A paradox of design automation is that adding higher level functionality to a CAD product bounds its use within a specific design modeling domain and restricts its use from other more general domains. On the other hand, more general CAD products are flexible at a primitive level, but can not be used to provide 'high level' functionality. Although design specific knowledge within a CAD product may prove to be a great utility in some instances, it is typically paid for in terms of pre-conceived constraints on modeling. Artificial Intelligence techniques may provide a way of offering high level functionality with less pre-conceived constraints; however, it may be fallacious to assume that o particular modeling domain will not be Imposed on the user. This paper illustrates how a modeling domain is typically defined with a commercial CAD product . It takes notice of how the assumptions underlying any particular modeling domain may be challenged by design theory. It then cautiously explores a scenario for how the need for a modeling domain may be reconciled in a "thousand flowers bloom" approach.

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Full text: content.pdf (3,047,902 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:1988 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.synthesis (0.021123) class.analysis (0.008794) class.man-software (0.003701)
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Permission to reproduce these documents has been graciously provided by the Lund University and the Swedish Building Centre. The assistance of the editors, Prof. Per Christiansson and Prof. Henry Karlsson, is gratefully appreciated.


Farinha M F

An educational tool in earthquake engineering

Abstract: "One of the main social purposes of education is the transmission of knowledge to the subsequent generations, in the most appropriate form. Throughout time, educators have resorted to the technologies at hand, in order to establish the best possible mechanisms for knowledge delivery. Increasing ease of access to computers and recent advances seen in information technologies now mean that these can be used as an important tool in the education process. The work that is presented in this paper is intended to demonstrate the potential of these systems in the understanding of the seismic phenomenon and in creating students’ awareness of the importance of the design of structural systems that will have a good performance under seismic conditions. The graphical presentation of vibration modes gives a clear understand of the structure’s behaviour. The main benefits that are expected are: i) to enhance the students’ interests on earthquake engineering; ii) to support students’ work so that they may become less dependent on the physical human presence, for tutoring and iii) to enable students to address more difficult and complex problems."

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Full text: content.pdf (896,203 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2000 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.social (0.048279) class.education (0.036006) class.analysis (0.026182)
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Permission to reproduce these documents have been graciously provided by Icelandic Building Research Institute. The assistance of the editor, Mr. Gudni Gudnason, is gratefully appreciated


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