Welcome
Digital library of construction informatics
and information technology in civil engineering and construction
 

Works 

Search Results

Facilitated by the SciX project

Hits 1 to 10 of 72

Message development in the building process

Abstract: New communication media offer new opportunities to exchange information between participants in a building project. A case study was done of a specific building project from the viewpoint of a company that produces concrete floors. An executable simulation model was used to create a formal description of the information exchange process. The output of the simulation is an activity schema, a message exchange diagram and a list of messages. The schemata give insight about the information flow and are a resource for developing a strategy for the introduction of electronic communication. The messages serve as a starting point for selecting a standardized electronic message or developing a special one.

Keywords:

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf (1,214,000 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:1995 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.communication (0.022605) class.synthesis (0.022488) class.collaboration (0.015924)
Similar papers:
Sound: read aloud.

Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by the Stanford University, USA. The support of the editors, particularly Prof. Fischer is gratefully appreciated.


Alshawi M

Objects definition and the life cycle of objects

Abstract: In order to produce a complete and efficient objects definition for an integrated environment, it is important that objects are considered within a well defined environment. Objects are subjected to a number of phases during their life cycle depending on the environment within which they are serving. This paper briefly explains a proposed structure for an integrated environment within which a new concept for object life cycle is introduced. The new concept is illustrated in an elements specifications application.

Keywords:

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf (1,215,425 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:1995 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.environment (0.037780) class.processing (0.025091) class.economic (0.011972)
Similar papers:
Sound: read aloud.

Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by the Stanford University, USA. The support of the editors, particularly Prof. Fischer is gratefully appreciated.


Amor R, Hosking J, Mugridge W

A declarative approach to inter-schema mappings

Abstract: The requirements for the specification of mappings between tools in an integrated and interactive design system are described in this paper. The declarative mapping language, VML, is introduced. VML allows a high level, bidirectional specification of mappings between two arbitrary schemas. To illustrate the utility of VML, a demonstration system consisting of plan definition and code conformance tools is integrated via a common data model using VML mappings. The VML mappings are capable of handling both relational and object-oriented style schemas as well as interactive and batch style design tools. We illustrate the use of VML to specify correspondences between classes, conditional application of correspondences, different styles of equivalence, initialisation conditions as well as method handling for interactive systems.

Keywords:

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf (1,068,779 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:1995 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.man-software (0.030558) class.software development (0.027038) class.represent (0.019168)
Similar papers:
Sound: read aloud.

Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by the Stanford University, USA. The support of the editors, particularly Prof. Fischer is gratefully appreciated.


Appelqvist I, Keijer U

Building integrity a prototype for an it support system

Abstract: The industrialization of the building industry requires a profound understanding of the interactions between building parts, elements, spaces and systems. The industrialization also causes an increasing number of actors and suppliers to be involved in the building process. The problems concerning interactions are not limited to technical issues. The organization of the process, as well as responsibilities and liabilities of consultants, subcontractors and other actors of the process contribute to the growing implications that constitute the problem in its whole. Neglecting the interaction problems could affect what has been called the Building Integrity problem, BI. The first part of the research has been concentrated to formulate the problem and the key questions to be answered. A conceptual schema describing the BI problem tentatively has been outlined. The schema includes some interesting classifying attributes, e.g. the functions of a building, building parts, spaces, actors and the causes of building defects. A so called "defect model" has been chosen as a base for an IT Support System. The system aims at supporting certain actors to detect BI problems in the building process. A prototype system is currently developed and is described.

Keywords:

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf (1,206,229 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:1995 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.man-software (0.029112) class.social (0.016984) class.represent (0.013808)
Similar papers:
Sound: read aloud.

Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by the Stanford University, USA. The support of the editors, particularly Prof. Fischer is gratefully appreciated.


Arlani A

Application of information technology in the building regulatory environment

Abstract: The Building Code and its associated regulations, standards, interpretations, rulings and explanatory support documents form a body ofmaterial which, like any law and its regulations, are complex and, attimes, esoteric. It is comprised of a series of concepts and their relationships, rules, exceptions to rules and examples. It essentially defines prescriptive states, conditions and actions for the builder/designer or identifies performance requirements for materials or systems.There is seldom rationale for the rules that could easily be understood and thus few answers to the question, "Why?". This makes building regulations difficult to develop, to use and to enforce. In this paper some applications of computers used in the Code Development process, as a user tool and as an instructional tool will be discussed.

Keywords:

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf (1,153,113 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:1992 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.legal (0.171184) class.synthesis (0.033042) class.analysis (0.021869)
Similar papers:
Sound: read aloud.

Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by Research Press of the National Research Council of Canada. The support of the editor, Dr. Dana Vanier, is gratefully appreciated.


Arnold J A, Teicholz P

Modeling and usle of component information in the process industry

Abstract: This in-process research project investigates the life-cycle information requirements for the components3 which are installed in process plant facilities. We have done this to gain insight into existing standards efforts and to understand the content requirements for the development of standard information models that represent such components. This work seeks to understand how these information models may be used to improve business and technical work processes through the development of software applications which support information sharing between component design objects rather than information exchange between design documents.

Keywords:

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf (1,424,261 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:1995 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.represent (0.026230) class.commerce (0.019810) class.processing (0.019388)
Similar papers:
Sound: read aloud.

Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by the Stanford University, USA. The support of the editors, particularly Prof. Fischer is gratefully appreciated.


Assal H, Eastman C

Engineering database as a medium for translation

Abstract: In this paper we describe the translation facilities as a component of EDM-2 database. We introduce a new approach to translation that is different from the traditional translators in databases and the standard neutral file approach. First, we define design views, which are different from database views in that they allow manipulation of data, and they represent the same object or information in different formats. Second, we define object structures that capture the different representations of objects and define the relationships among them. The two main relationships here are the specialization lattice and the composition lattice. Third, we describe the basic steps of the translation process and generalize the common ones. We provide facilities for developing translators that take advantage of this generalization. We present an example of the most common representations in engineering design (IGES and DXF) to illustrate the various steps and structures in our model.

Keywords:

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf (1,318,897 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:1995 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.represent (0.026130) class.synthesis (0.017787) class.store (0.011500)
Similar papers:
Sound: read aloud.

Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by the Stanford University, USA. The support of the editors, particularly Prof. Fischer is gratefully appreciated.


Augenbroe G

The combine project: a global assessment

Abstract: The outcome of the EU funded COMBINE project will be assessed. The objectives of COMBINE (Computer Models for the Building Industry in Europe) are to deliver the first examples of a future generation of intelligent integrated building design systems to engineering design practices, with the emphasis on the energy and HVAC disciplines. The objective is accomplished by embedding proven IT solutions for data integration in a system architecture that enables the information exchange among the members of a building design team. An overview of the approach of the 70 man years effort between 1990 and 1995 by a consortium of 11 R and D institutions across Europe is presented.. A global assessment of the overall approach and the use of available product data technology that have led to three prototypes of integrated building design systems is given.

Keywords:

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf (888,136 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:1995 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.software development (0.012897) class.represent (0.011783) class.roadmaps (0.011353)
Similar papers:
Sound: read aloud.

Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by the Stanford University, USA. The support of the editors, particularly Prof. Fischer is gratefully appreciated.


Chan P

The use of web-based tools to support a contractual claim in arbitration or litigation

Abstract: Most standard forms of building contracts provide for the use of arbitration as a means of dispute resolution, failing which, the parties have to settle their disputes in court. Each dispute is resolved by examining whether the party who makes a contractual claim is able to discharge his burden of proof in both the liability issue and the quantum issue. The scope of proof is usually prescribed by the building contract. Evidence of information, facts and opinions may be adduced in support of a claim. Most project information may be stored in a web-based information management system. In existence are also some IT applications which may assist in providing facts and opinions that may support a claim. 4D Modelling may be used to simulate critical paths for the evaluation of an extension of time claim. GPS may provide the tracking of the use of resources to help attribute the cost of their use to the basis of a claim. The latest technology of LADAR may assist by recording through time, the as-built status of the project at any one time thereby determining the real-time progress of work. The use of computer-generated evidence is provided for by legislation and case law. This paves the way to use web-based tools to support a contractual claim in arbitration or litigation by linking the whole system to a claims service that monitors the situations where a claim may be made and trigger off a warning so that the procedure of claim may be pursued by a party if he chooses to do so. The claims service should then extract the necessary data from the other services in the project web to build up a claim.

Keywords:

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf (163,938 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2003 (browse)
Cluster:
Class:
Similar papers:
Sound: N/A.

Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by the University of Auckland. The assistance of the editor who provided the full texts and the structured metadata, Dr. Robert Amor, is gratefully appreciated.


Chen S E, McGeorge W D

A life-cycle decision-information model accommodating complexity in project processes

Abstract: Fragmentation and barriers to information flows between project participants has been a major obstacle to productivity quality in the construction industry. Strategies to overcome this needs to contend with the interaction between numerous project participants which generates considerable complexity in project dynamics. A “soft” technology approach has been advocated to managing the coordination and communication of project participants. A dynamic framework to provide integrated decision support to project participants has been previously described. As an extension to the development of this framework, this paper describes a conceptual approach which perceives a project as an integrated collection of decisions. The project development process .is modelled as a dynamic decision-information flow system operating across the project’s life cycle. The recognition of individual decisions as system components allows information sharing in a near red-time context, which would facilitate an integrated project process. Feedback processes in the model provide a framework for accommodating complexity in the project process.

Keywords:

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf (794,238 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:1995 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.processing (0.066513) class.man-software (0.015397) class.communication (0.011923)
Similar papers:
Sound: read aloud.

Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by the Stanford University, USA. The support of the editors, particularly Prof. Fischer is gratefully appreciated.


For more results click below:

 

hosted by University of Ljubljana



includes

W78




© itc.scix.net 2003
this is page 1 show page 2 show page 3 show page 4 show page 5 show page 6 ... show page 8 Home page of this database login Powered by SciX Open Publishing Services 1.002 February 16, 2003