Welcome
Digital library of construction informatics
and information technology in civil engineering and construction
 

Works 

Search Results

Facilitated by the SciX project

Hits 11 to 20 of 62

Drogemuller R

Modelling static and dynamic knowledge during design

Abstract: The IS0 STEP standards for product data modelling and exchange are based on the use of Express. Express has acknowledged limitations. Modifications have been suggested to extend Express (Express-E) into a more object-oriented language and to add rules as a means of encoding knowledge. The EDM group have presented solutions to many of these limitations for the modelling of buildings. This paper discusses BDeCS (Building Design and Construction System), an interactive system that supports building design and construction. BDeCS uses ideas from Express, EDM and the various knowledge representation formalisms developed in AI research. The initial development of BDeCS concentrated on the representation of knowledge within the system. The user interface was then developed around methods of interacting with the howledge in as "natural" a way as possible. Limitations of both knowledge representation formalisms from the AI field and traditional software development have been identified. The needs for extensibility and sharing of information among all of the members of the building design and construction team have lead to a software architecture that is unique. Methods of organising teams of people to work concurrently on the one project, while maintaining consistency of the data have also been developed.

Keywords:

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf (1,246,710 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:1995 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.man-software (0.070743) class.software development (0.024602) class.represent (0.021522)
Similar papers:
Sound: read aloud.

Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by the Stanford University, USA. The support of the editors, particularly Prof. Fischer is gratefully appreciated.


Eastman C M, Assal H, Jeng T

Structure of a product database supporting model evolution

Abstract: One of the primary capabilities for integrated data models and databases for design is support for dynamic evolution. The need is to support design changes that affect the schema, and often existing objects already loaded with data. We present scenarios using EDM-2, a database providing these capabilities.

Keywords:

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf (1,263,046 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:1995 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.represent (0.068152) class.store (0.017249) class.retrieve (0.001897)
Similar papers:
Sound: read aloud.

Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by the Stanford University, USA. The support of the editors, particularly Prof. Fischer is gratefully appreciated.


Ekholm A, Fridqvist S

Ob ject-oriented caad' - design object structure, and models for buildings, user organisation and site

Abstract: In the early stages of the building design process not only building and site but also user activities and experiences are fonned. In this project conceptual models of some fundamental characteristics of building, site and user organisation will be developed and implemented in a prototype CAD-programme. The programming work for the prototypes is done with Smalltalk on Macintosh computers. The tests of the prototype includes spatial coordination of the three systems. The models are based on an ontological framework which is also used for organising the basic object structure of the prototype CAD program. In the design process, information about the design object is gradually developed. Starthg from certain desired properties, the whole and its parts are fonned by successive increase of detail. The project investigates how the data structure of the design object can be formed to serve this working method. The project also discusses possible future developments. One important question is how these models maybe used in the development of the brief and in the building management stage.

Keywords:

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf (1,439,701 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:1995 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.software development (0.034496) class.analysis (0.018928) class.represent (0.014989)
Similar papers:
Sound: read aloud.

Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by the Stanford University, USA. The support of the editors, particularly Prof. Fischer is gratefully appreciated.


Elvekrok D R, Johansen B W, Syvertsen T G, Totland T

World wide web as a coordination technology for knowledge work

Abstract: This paper will bring some understanding of the World Wide Web as an information and coordination technology, and suggest some principles and metaphors for Web working. The suggestions will be underpinned by recent experiences from a collective Web-working project, and a transformation of a technical standard into hypertext format. Some ideas and visions for future developments based on the new medium are presented. World Wide Web is more than a tool or a technology, it is a new medium based on a set of very simple principles that enable us to cope with a vast Ocean of information and knowledge. The basics of World Wide Web and HTML (Hypertext Markup Language) will be explained. A small-scale experiment in collective writing in Web will be reported. The task was development of the PAKT Yearbook of 1994, where a dozen of contributors worked concurrently on individual pieces around a shared Yearbook structure. This small project may in some sense resemble an engineering project, where many discipline experts are performing individual tasks around a shared goal and work breakdown structure. The experiment was based on use of Microsoft Internet Assistant which provides a simple add-on that makes Microsoft Word a combined Web reader and writer. Using this interface to the Web, working there is as simple as traditional word-processing. This mode of working can easily be expanded with any kind of tool based on the same concepts of process linking. There is, however, no support for the work processes associated with creating the product (in our case a Yearbook), or the organization of the processes. Based on our experiences, we suggest some metaphors and practical approaches to efficient Web working. Another experiment has been in the domain of technical standards. A couple of existing, paper- based standards from the petroleum industry have been converted to HTML, with cross-references transferred to active hyper-links. Using WWW as a one-way information server and as a shared working space will be illustrated. We see at least three future aspects of Web development; active objects replace static information, information structures will be supplemented by knowledge processes (enterprise modelling), and the information economy will evolve based on integrated flow of transactions.

Keywords:

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf (1,745,393 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:1995 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.roadmaps (0.065275) class.collaboration (0.038981) class.economic (0.022244)
Similar papers:
Sound: read aloud.

Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by the Stanford University, USA. The support of the editors, particularly Prof. Fischer is gratefully appreciated.


Erbug C

An ergonomics model for product design

Abstract: This paper models the integration of ergonomics knowledge to the design process. It is suggested that, neither a single methodology, nor an information system will be sufficient to cover all the requirements of an ergonomic product. The relative emphasis given to ergonomics varies with the types of design problem. Nonetheless, it is assumed that the design process will always involve the user, thus ergonomics. The difficulties arise from ill-defined nature of design, inadequate knowledge background or inadequate data which requires a long-tern approach where everything should be thought at macro level. For this purpose, the aim of the paper is to propose a communication model for ergonomists and designers who believe in the value of experts. Therefore, this model presents a macro outlook onto ergonomics and product design, whereas further studies may extend the scope by presenting sub-models for reaching details in the design process or existing micro models (expert or aiding systems) will be valuable sources if they are inserted into this system. "he research is focused on literature search, accident analysis and design strategy analysis. The chief questions to be addressed in the literature search are: - What is the relation between design and ergonomics? - What is designer's responsibility in terms of design, manufacturing and products liability? - What kind of ergonomics information do designers need? How reliable are they? . - What is meant by product-user interaction? The chief questions to be addressed in accident analysis are: - What kind of information does accident analysis provide? - What is the reliability of accident data?. - How is this information used in design? The chief questions to be addressed in design strategy analysis are: - What is a model and what type of models exist in design? - What is design management? - What is a product life-cycle? reputation? . - What are the benefits of product safety in terms of company's reputation?

Keywords:

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf (1,072,735 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:1995 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.represent (0.026991) class.synthesis (0.025631) class.social (0.018099)
Similar papers:
Sound: read aloud.

Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by the Stanford University, USA. The support of the editors, particularly Prof. Fischer is gratefully appreciated.


Finch E F, Flanagan R, Marsh1 L E

Electronic document management in construction using auto id

Abstract: The construction process relies upon the effective management of a variety of project information including drawings; specifications; bills of quantities; and other technical data. The method of information transfer determines the ease with which information can be assimilated and used into the construction process. Despite the widespread use of computers for the generation of project information, hard copy documentation remains the primary method of information transfer withn the construction industry. Electronic Document Management (EDM) systems offer a'level of control over information flow within the construction process, whether documents are in hard copy or in electronic format. However, many of the existing methods of information transfer undermine the performance of EDM systems in two respects; (1) they require the user to re-enter information to register incoming documents into a data base; (2) they cannot interpret and manipulate information contained in or supporting the document. Ths paper describes a method of bar coding hard copy drawings in order to electronically transfer document information from designer to contractor. This approach is designed to improve the functionality of EDM system where hard copy documents predominate. The paper also considers the requirements for bar code application standards which would further improve the data exchange process concerning documents.

Keywords:

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf (1,255,849 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:1995 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.bestPractise (0.044653) class.store (0.039576) class.education (0.029936)
Similar papers:
Sound: read aloud.

Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by the Stanford University, USA. The support of the editors, particularly Prof. Fischer is gratefully appreciated.


Finch E

The significance of markup languages in construction

Abstract: The adoption of a standard markup language offers significant benefits for construction firms who today are having to manage considerable amounts of project information. The term markup originates from the early practise of publishers who routinely made notes in margins to identify elements of text. Electronic data interchange (EDI) in construction has tended to focus on the exchange of CAD based information, but little advance has been made in the adoption of textual formats. This paper discusses the shortcomings of conventional methods of text based exchange and points to some of the radical departures afforded by markup based systems. In particular; the opportunities for collaborative preparation of documents during the design process; the opportunities for maintaining and reusing information; and the possibility of increased connectivity between documents and sites.

Keywords:

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf (1,068,426 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:1995 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.bestPractise (0.046207) class.communication (0.041407) class.store (0.011887)
Similar papers:
Sound: read aloud.

Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by the Stanford University, USA. The support of the editors, particularly Prof. Fischer is gratefully appreciated.


Fischer M A, Luiten G T B, Aalami F

Representing project information and construction method knowledge for computer- aided construction management

Abstract: Currently available construction management software has serious limitations that hinder further integration and automation of construction management tasks. The main limitation is the low level at which project information and knowledge is represented. This means that integration of design and construction planning information and automated reasoning about, for example, planning, are difficult to implement. In two research projects at the Center for Integrated Facility Engineering at Stanford University, we are addressing these limitations. In the SPACECAKE project we propose a higher level representation of project information that explicitly represents the relations between products, activities, construction methods and resources. A prototype system shows that it is possible to implement our conceptual model and support project management decisions. In the MOCA project we elaborate further on the representation of construction method knowledge. In this paper we propose a template to make the knowledge explicit and computer-interpretable.

Keywords:

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf (1,466,181 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:1995 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.synthesis (0.016915) class.bestPractise (0.009748) class.software development (0.008872)
Similar papers:
Sound: read aloud.

Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by the Stanford University, USA. The support of the editors, particularly Prof. Fischer is gratefully appreciated.


Froese T

Core process models and application areas in construction

Abstract: Integrated computer systems for the construction industry require high-level, general purpose core models of construction information to support information sharing. This paper introduces core models for building and construction, in particular an effort within the IS0 STEP organization. The paper then reviews several typical areas of computer applications for construction-planning and scheduling, estimating and cost control, and contract and document management-and discusses the implications of each application area on core models of construction processes.

Keywords:

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf (1,229,786 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:1995 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.store (0.033698) class.processing (0.027371) class.communication (0.012054)
Similar papers:
Sound: read aloud.

Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by the Stanford University, USA. The support of the editors, particularly Prof. Fischer is gratefully appreciated.


Garnett N, Barlow R, Papantonopoulos S, Fisher N

The application of knowledge based electronic protoyping to a project process at concept phase

Abstract: This paper describes the results of a research project concerned with integrating a building project model developed using object-oriented Knowledge-Based (KB) techniques with an existing project process. The initial product modelling work was the result of an earlier research project aimed at proving how the manufacturing concept of electronic prototyping could be used in construction. The integration of the model within the project process is discussed m the short term but the paper concludes by demonstrating the longer term implications for construction of information technology adopting a more central role.

Keywords:

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf (1,226,137 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:1995 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.impact (0.029767) class.software development (0.029761) class.environment (0.019286)
Similar papers:
Sound: read aloud.

Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by the Stanford University, USA. The support of the editors, particularly Prof. Fischer is gratefully appreciated.


For more results click below:

 

hosted by University of Ljubljana



includes

W78




© itc.scix.net 2003
show page 1 this is page 2 show page 3 show page 4 show page 5 show page 6 show page 7 Home page of this database login Powered by SciX Open Publishing Services 1.002 February 16, 2003