Welcome
Digital library of construction informatics
and information technology in civil engineering and construction
 

Works 

Search Results

Facilitated by the SciX project

Hits 1 to 10 of 18

F Andrieux, S Maïssa, M Thorel

Knowledge Management for Decision Making in Holistic Building Renovation Design

Abstract:

Keywords:

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf (141,778 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2012 (browse)
Cluster:
Class:
Similar papers:
Sound: N/A.


H Luo, Z Guo, L Ma

A Safety Risk Management Database for Metro Construction Project

Abstract:

Keywords:

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf (610,857 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2013 (browse)
Cluster:
Class:
Similar papers:
Sound: N/A.


Homan Ma, Kwan Mei Elsa Ha, Chun Kit Jackie Chung, and Robert Amor

Testing Semantic Interoperability

Abstract: With standardised semantic representations of construction objects able to be transferred between major CAD systems, and other design tools, there is an expectation, supported by compliance testing, that semantically consistent data will flow across the project team. This assumption is questioned due to the known difficulties in mapping consistently and completely between two distinct representations of an artifact. To test the ability of CAD, and design tools, a number of buildings, described in a standard format, are loaded and then saved directly back out of these tools and then checked for differences. A range of potential differences has been postulated, and experiments show the existence of most categories of differences when data files are examined.

Keywords:

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf (586,255 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2006 (browse)
Cluster:
Class:
Similar papers:
Sound: N/A.


J C P Cheng, J Ma

Development of a Decision Support System for LEED for EB Credit Selection Based on Climate Factors

Abstract:

Keywords:

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf (93,684 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2014 (browse)
Cluster:
Class:
Similar papers:
Sound: N/A.


J Ma, J C P Cheng

Analysis of the Related Credits in LEED Green Building Rating System Using Data Mining Techniques

Abstract:

Keywords:

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf (110,021 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2014 (browse)
Cluster:
Class:
Similar papers:
Sound: N/A.


Ling Ma, Rafael Sacks and Uri Kattel

Building Model Object Classification for Semantic Enrichment Using Geometric Features and Pairwise Spatial Relationships

Abstract: Semantic enrichment is a process of supplementing/correcting information in a poorly prepared BIM model. Object classifications are essential information, but are commonly missing or incorrectly represented when transferring a BIM model or creating a model using tools customized for other domains in design. Automated compilation of 'as-is' BIM models from point cloud data also requires object classification, as well as 3D reconstruction. We present a systematic approach to classifying objects in a BIM model, for use in future semantic enrichment systems. Previous work on object classification in BIM model enrichment was restricted by its limited ability to accurately interpret geometric and spatial features and by the constraints of Boolean logic rules and the rule compilation process. To address these issues, we propose a procedure for establishing a knowledge base that associates objects with their features and relationships, and a matching algorithm based on a similarity measurement between the knowledge base and facts. An implementation on a synthetic bridge model shows that whereas some objects can be classified by shape features alone, most objects require the use of spatial relations for unique classification. Spatial context is more likely uniquely identify an object than shape features are.

Keywords: Building Information Modelling, Semantic Enrichment, Geometric Feature, Spatial Relation, Object Classification

DOI: https://doi.org/10.24928/JC3-2017/0044

Full text: content.pdf (1,044,975 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: jc3:2017 (browse)
Cluster:
Class:
Similar papers:
Sound: N/A.


R Zeibak-Shini, L Ma, R Sacks

Mapping the Structural Frame of a Damaged Reinforced Concrete Building using As-Damaged Scans and As-Built BIM

Abstract:

Keywords:

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf (558,755 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2015 (browse)
Cluster:
Class:
Similar papers:
Sound: N/A.


Robert Amor, Ying Jiang, Xiaofan Chen

BIM in 2007 – are we there yet?

Abstract: As the prevalence of BIM increases in A/E/C-FM disciplines it is timely to review the standards that are being utilised and how well they are serving the discipline. The analysis presented analyses the most common standard, the IAI’s IFC, from a meta-level and asks questions about the evolving model from the viewpoint of metrics for data models as well as a low level analysis of the accuracy and correctness of implementations of the data model interpret-ers. Metrics applied to the evolving versions of the IFC schema can indicate the trajectory of the schema and profile areas which may be of concern in the maintenance of the schema and applications that have to utilise the schema. Analysis of the approaches to importing and exporting data for design tools, based on the schema, help indicate how market ready the technology really is. Where commercial projects are starting to rely on the standards as a mechanism to reliably transfer semantically correct information there must be guarantees of the accuracy of the data as it is ma-nipulated by these design tools.

Keywords: data model, metrics, translator, data management

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf (188,991 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2007 (browse)
Cluster:
Class:
Similar papers:
Sound: N/A.


Vladimir Bazjanac, Arto Kiviniemi

Reduction, simplification, translation and interpretation in the exchange of model data

Abstract: A major purpose of Building Information Models (BIM) is to serve as a comprehensive repository of data that are retrievable by multiple software applications which participate in the same AECO industry project. Data placed in a BIM by one software application are retrieved and used by other applications. Retrieved data are at times not useable by the recipient application in exactly the same form as received; in such cases the received data are ma-nipulated and/or transformed before they can be used. This paper provides an overview of issues that arise when data transformation is necessary for “downstream” applica-tions that use data authored by model based CAD and/or other interoperable software. These include manual and semi-manual data transformation, as well as rules for data set reduction and simplification, and rules for data translation and interpretation. The rules can be imbedded in data model views and middleware to become part of a seamless proc-ess of data exchange and sharing.

Keywords: buildings, data modeling, BIM, data transformation, data reduction, data, simplification, data transla-tion, data interpretation, rules of transformation

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf (204,384 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2007 (browse)
Cluster:
Class:
Similar papers:
Sound: N/A.


Willems P H, Tolman F B

Semantic topology: the management of shape definition

Abstract: Over the last decade Computer Aided Design (CAD) systems have found their way in the building industry and have become a mayor tool for defining the shape of a prod- uct. However, CAD systems still do not really seem to aid the design process during all its stages. They fail to assist the early design phases, where shape definitions are not fixed yet, but exist stilr as roughly sketched contours. This paper investigates shortcomings of the state of the art CAD-systems, with regard to their application in all design stages, especially within the building industry. A new approach for shape definition is intrduced. This approach, called ‘Semantic Topology’, should be able to bridge the gap between advanced product model struc- tures and conventional geometric modelling. ’ This implies bringing in features for: - adjusting the tolerancing level, eg, a liberal tolerancing level in the early design stage ending in the accepted manufacturing tolerances after the completion of the final design. defining shape constraints, shape constraints should clearly define the modelling freedom to define a cer- tain shape. This feature is particular important for realising concurrent engi- neering. modular structures, in contrast to monolithic structures, are essential to ma- nipulate product models, standard part libraries and very large shape models. a consistent shape decomposition helps to integrate shape definition with product definition. It is insportant to stress that Semantic Topology does not introduce a new kind of geometric modelling, yet it acts as an intermediary layer between a product model kernel and a geometric model. I making geometrical structures fit for modular handling, - shape decomposition support,

Keywords:

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf (1,756,871 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:1993 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.synthesis (0.035822) class.represent (0.029391) class.legal (0.002341)
Similar papers:
Sound: read aloud.

Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by the National University of Singapore. The assistance of the editors, particularly Prof. Martin Betts, is gratefully appreciated.


For more results click below:

 

hosted by University of Ljubljana



includes

W78




© itc.scix.net 2003
this is page 1 show page 2 Home page of this database login Powered by SciX Open Publishing Services 1.002 February 16, 2003