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A Cormier, S Robert, P Roger, B Hilaire

Towards a BIM-based service-oriented platform for a collaborative multidisciplinary teamwork

Abstract: With the growing trend in the building industry to usesoftware tools able to handle Building Information Model (BIM), staffs are more and more confronted with workflows conflicts. In order to improve their efficiency, up-to-date techniques for dealing with BIM sharing are required. Attempting to address this issue, a web services platform, especially optimized to deal with the already well-recognized Industry Foundation Classes (IFC) open standard, has been developed.This article describes the platform (architecture, software components, technologies), specially emphasizing on the strategies envisaged for collaborative work support. To illustrate resulting benefits for the building industry,it also gives an overview of the work already performed on a platform service dedicated to dynamic thermal simulation.

Keywords: BIM, IFC, Software-as-a-Service, Life Cycle Support, Design, Simulation

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Full text: content.pdf (646,717 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2011 (browse)
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Andrew P. McCoy, Robert Schubert, Robert Dunay, Joe Wheeler

lumenHAUS: Uses and Benefits of ICT for Design-Build Educational Environments

Abstract: By many accounts, American classrooms are not using the most effective means to properly educate and train young graduates and professionals. Common goals involve educational achievement and market advantage for students, with a wide variety of proposed solutions. Among the many solutions, technology in the classroom environment has been touted as one route for translating academic goals to the market. Education in the Architecture, Engineering and Construction (AEC) industry is no different: a rise in industry and classroom technology, paired with enrollment, justifies the need to re-focus solutions from technology to provide for the academic and market needs in the built environment. The recent Virginia Tech 2009 Solar Decathlon Competition (VTSD) offered an ideal setting for better understanding effective uses of technology in the translation of these AEC goals. VTSD was a student-led, integrated classroom environment incorporating students of all disciplines in the design and construction of an energy-efficient home. Information and communication technologies (ICT) played a major role in the educational and competitive efforts, all of which could translate to market advantage. This paper aims to explore academic uses and benefits of ICT for increased market acceptance through: 1) presenting common goals to the classroom, design-build education and the 2009 Solar Decathlon competition, 2) presenting various forms of ICT used to accomplish these goals and 3) presenting preliminary results of a survey of market acceptance for incorporated technologies.

Keywords: IT Supported Architectural and Engineering Design, Communication and Collaboration Technologies, Model Based Management Tools and Systems, Building Information Modeling

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Full text: content.pdf (236,600 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2010 (browse)
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Carl P. L. Schultz, Robert Amor, Hans W. Guesgen, Brenda Lobb

A decision support software tool for reasoning about the subjective impressions of a lighting installation

Abstract: The discipline of architecture is concerned with finding a balance between both the functional and the subjective aspects of a building environment. This involves managing contradictory requirements that are often difficult to resolve through purely numerical analysis; an example of this is an electrical lighting installation designed to evoke a desired subjective impression or ‘atmosphere’, which may conflict with the visual requirements for accurate or safe task performance. Despite this, few software tools exist that directly support an architect when dealing with information relating to the non-visual effects of lighting. A fundamental limitation in standard software tools is the reliance on nu-merical approaches for representing and reasoning about lighting and construction related information. In particular, when information is uncertain or completely unavailable, numerical formulae can be awkward or impossible to use in a reliable way. Work in the field of qualitative reasoning has attempted to address these issues, and in this paper we pre-sent a prototype decision support software tool that reports on the subjective impressions of a lighting scheme, based on a qualitative spatial reasoning engine. Research in subjective response to lighting is reviewed and interpreted in the context of qualitative reasoning, and the prototype system is compared to studies on subjective impressions.

Keywords: Building environBenoMdecision support software , BenoMsp

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Full text: content.pdf (248,851 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2007 (browse)
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Carlos A Arboleda, Dulcy M. Abraham, Jean-Philippe P. Richard, and Robert Lubitz

Impact Of Interdependencies Between Infrastructure Systems In The Operation Of Health Care Facilities During Disaster Events

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Full text: content.pdf (837,412 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2006 (browse)
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Cox, Robert F.

The Use of Project Specific Websites as a Virtual Office

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Full text: content.pdf (166,867 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: convr:2006 (browse)
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Dylan John, Yunfeng Chen, Robert Cox and Qian Huang

USA PractitionersÕ Perception of BIM Maturity

Abstract: This paper examines the USA practitionerÕs perspective of Building Information Modeling Maturity (BIMM). The objective is to better identify the BIMM indicators from practitionersÕ perspective as it would provide better insight and feedback into the use and practice of BIM in the USA industry. This would help fill the gap in understanding and breaking down the complexity of BIM and will allow for better approaches to BIM education and more tangible adoption in Industry. The study is structured based off the four BIMM factors of Technology, Information, Process and People. A survey was used as the research methodology with a breakdown of the survey responses based on their business type and number of years working with BIM. The research findings indicate that Information is the most important maturity factor, followed by Process and the lowest ranked maturity factor is People followed by Technology. The findings of this study has both academic and industry value as it gives greater insight to the practitioners perspective of the different maturity indicators and as such can be used to develop better BIM education and industry adoption practices.

Keywords: BIM, Maturity, USA, Practitioner

DOI: https://doi.org/10.24928/JC3-2017/0155

Full text: content.pdf (533,877 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: jc3:2017 (browse)
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Hazar Dib, Raja R.A. Issa, and Robert Cox

Visual Information Access And Management For Life Cycle Project Management

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Full text: content.pdf (527,954 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2006 (browse)
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Homan Ma, Kwan Mei Elsa Ha, Chun Kit Jackie Chung, and Robert Amor

Testing Semantic Interoperability

Abstract: With standardised semantic representations of construction objects able to be transferred between major CAD systems, and other design tools, there is an expectation, supported by compliance testing, that semantically consistent data will flow across the project team. This assumption is questioned due to the known difficulties in mapping consistently and completely between two distinct representations of an artifact. To test the ability of CAD, and design tools, a number of buildings, described in a standard format, are loaded and then saved directly back out of these tools and then checked for differences. A range of potential differences has been postulated, and experiments show the existence of most categories of differences when data files are examined.

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Full text: content.pdf (586,255 bytes) (available to registered users only)

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Johannes Dimyadi, Guido Governatori and Robert Amor

Evaluating LegalDocML and LegalRuleML as a Standard for Sharing Normative Information in the AEC/FM Domain

Abstract: Legal text is typically conveyed in natural language and thus not readily suitable for computer processing. Numerous work-around approaches have been proposed by researchers in the Architecture, Engineering, Construction and Facilities Management (AEC/FM) domain over the last four decades to create computable representations of normative data that can be used to automate some of the processes in the domain. The transition from human-readable text to a structured representation can occur in many possible ways, e.g. through Natural Language Processing (NLP) techniques, manual annotations, or through direct coding. In all cases, however, the human-readable document at the source remains the sole point of reference. Ideally, however, one digital structured representation should also be available and recognised as the single digital point of reference.Research in the AEC/FM domain has shown that automated compliant building design processes would benefit from a single standardised and manageable digital representation of normative data. Recent efforts in the legal domain have shown promising developments in legal mark-up languages such as LegalDocML and LegalRuleML as emerging open standards for legal knowledge interchange. In this article, we explore the potential of adapting these emerging standards to accommodate specific requirements of the AEC/FM domain.

Keywords: Legal Knowledge Model, Normative Information, Automated Compliance Audit, LegalDocML, LegalRuleML

DOI: https://doi.org/10.24928/JC3-2017/0012

Full text: content.pdf (1,311,201 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: jc3:2017 (browse)
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Klinc Robert

DEVELOPMENT OF COMPUTER ASSISTED LEARNING TOOL FOR EARTHQUAKE ENGINEERING

Abstract: Today, we live in the world where the information and communication technologies are developing faster than ever before. We receive information and learn from a variety of sources. However, such learning is rarely related to the official programmes of higher education. Lecturers must compete with, for example, Discovery channel, games and/or other audio/video/internet media. That is why many students today have great expectations which even the well prepared and quality books cannot satisfy. Besides, it is difficult to attract their attention when the lessons are not dynamic and the lectured subject is not illustrated as it could be, considering all the technologies available. This paper describes a possible approach for teaching the basics of earthquake engineering through the use of animations (simulations) and active participation of the students. It could be a great addition to classical teaching methods in civil and earthquake engineering. Besides, the idea and the development of the prototype of the learning tool are described. That type of media gives the lecturer the opportunity to animate students, to give them the possibility to dig deeper into the discussed subject, and to learn through experimenting (‘playing’) with carefully prepared examples.

Keywords: computer based learning

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Series: other (browse)
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