Welcome
Digital library of construction informatics
and information technology in civil engineering and construction
 

Works 

Search Results

Facilitated by the SciX project

Hits 1 to 10 of 19

Alain Zarli, Abdul Samad (Sami) Kazi, Matti Hannus, Marc Bourdeau, Anders Ekholm, Ronny Andersson

A strategic and comprehensive vision for future R&D in construction ICT

Abstract: The tremendous development in the past ten last years of the Internet and ICT at large (whether it be in general technologies like semantic modeling, knowledge mining, RFID or mobile technologies, or domain-oriented ones like e-commerce, collaborative spaces, digital mock-ups, etc.) has opened a large spectrum of potential applica-tions of ICT in the Construction sector. The real adaptation and deployment of ICT in Construction has indeed just started, and there is a high need to organize and plan future R&D actions for Construction ICT, while at the same time to better evaluate the benefits and thereby convince Construction actors. This is the role of the Strat-CON and BICT projects, respectively, which are introduced in this article in terms of their aims and major results.

Keywords: strategic research agenda, construction processes & industrialisation, ICT

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf (794,806 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2007 (browse)
Cluster:
Class:
Similar papers:
Sound: N/A.


B de Vries

Building management simulation center

Abstract: Introduction to the BMSC In the Building Management Simulation Center new and experienced construction managers are trained. The center is unique because of the use of a virtual building site that can be inspected by the trainees. The actual status of the building and of the building materials and equipment on the building site is simulated by the system dependent on the trainee’s actions. The main part of the center is the simulation hall. Here, ten cabins are located with a view on a large parabolic projection screen. The trainee has to execute tasks in the cabin in an environment that is familiar to him/her. On the projection screen the building under construction can be viewed and it can be inspected by navigation through the full-scale model. Similar VR based training systems can be found in the aircraft industry, the automotive industry [http://www.ttsl.co.uk/home.htm] en de shipbuilding industry [http://thor.sv.vt.edu/crane/]. These examples inspired the initiators of the BMSC to investigate if the same methodology could be used in the building industry. Building site activity patterns Construction process simulation research has mainly been focused on the development of a construction planning analysis tool [e.g. V.R. Kamat, J.C. Martinez in proceedings of CIT2000]. In the BMSC though, interaction between the construction manager and the building on the building site will steer the construction process simulation. Investigations on the building site and discussions with experienced construction managers learned that they work in fixed patterns. A pattern consisting of a list of activities is called a transition type. These transition types describe all kinds of procedures that a construction manager performs to fulfill a specific tasks (e.g. ordering of new material). Transition types also take into account actions required to perform corrections beforehand or afterwards. For a specific case the transitions were entered into the system. The transitions were deduced from the construction managers that had worked on that building project when it was actually built. For the training purposes every possible situation the trainee can end up with has to be covered by the transitions. The interactive 3D training system The trainee’s actions are logged by a kind of Electronic Data Management System. All documents that are created during a training session are stored in the system. The system itself also contains project information that can be consulted. Finally the system offers an interface to communicate with the other participants in the project. After the training session that consists of the execution of a set of tasks, the system has stored all actions, their order and the produced documents. These data are compared with the predefined transitions for the case that was used. The document contents are compared with the predefined activity results. With this method it is easy to detect if the trainee missed certain activities in a transition and if the information is consistent. Finally, a visual feedback can be created be regeneration the 3D model in the VR environment in accordance with the trainee’s actions. The 3D model will show has far the building could have been built successfully. The learning effect After the training session the trainee will be confronted with the (possible) mismatch between has own actions and the preferred actions following from the predefined transitions. Evidently this is discussed during the evaluation after the training. Recognition of the right transition by the trainee to solve a specific task is considered one of the major learning effects of a BMSC training. Paper Outline In the paper the software architecture of the system will be explained. The activity patterns and the management of the system are discussed in more detail. A layout of the building where the BMSC is hosted is presented. Finally some examples of the training sessions will illustrate how the BMSC operates in practice and an overview will be presented of the first experiences.

Keywords:

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf (1,053,282 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2001 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.deployment (0.027827) class.man-software (0.018630) class.communication (0.013308)
Similar papers:
Sound: read aloud.

Permission to reproduce these documents have been graciously provided by CSIR Building and Construction Technology. The assistance of the editors, Mr. Gustav Coetzee and Mr. Frances Boshoff, is gratefully appreciated.


BJORK B-C

A Case Study of a National Building Industry Strategy for Computer Integrated Construction

Abstract: Computer integrated construction (CIC) is a future state of the use of IT in construction characterised by the extensive use of computers for all kinds of application as well as by the transfer of information between such applications in digital form. CIC necessitates an infrastructure of data structuring and transfer standards, computer networks, digital information services for construction, etc. This paper presents the efforts made during the last ten years by the Finnish construction industry to develop strategic parts of such an infrastructure, the RATAS project. In addition to a survey of a number of technical projects, the paper also presents the organisational aspects of the project and attempts to evaluate the results that have been achieved so far.

Keywords: computer integrated construction; product model; standardisation; data exchange; object-oriented

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf (726,585 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:1993 (browse)
Cluster:
Class:
Similar papers:
Sound: read aloud.

Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by the National University of Singapore. The assistance of the editors, particularly Prof. Martin Betts, is gratefully appreciated.


Chen A,Golparvar-Fard M,Kleiner B

SAVES: a safety training augmented virtuality environment for construction hazard recognition and severity identification

Abstract: One of the most challenging aspects of health and safety (H&S) management for construction sites is ensuring that workers can predict, identify, and respond to potential hazardous conditions before they are exposed. While OSHA addresses the need for enforcement of comprehensive H&S training programs, many safety training programs still do not include hazard recognition or systematic preparations for the avoidance of unsafe conditions. From a scientific standpoint, we currently lack the knowledge of discovering the most efficient training styles for safety and also understanding why and how these styles of training can influence the post-training activities. To address these needs, an Augmented Virtuality(AV) training environment named System for Augmented Virtuality Environment Safety (SAVES) was designed and is presented in this paper. SAVES which integrates a Building Information Model (BIM) with photographs of typical energy sources on a jobsite, allows trainees to control and navigate an avatar within such AV environment. Within the AV environment, the user can conduct a set of interactions with the environment and accomplish multiple instruction and task-based training scenarios. These scenarios include detection of ten types of hazard and/or energy sources at three levels of severity. The energy sources which in SAVES are embedded in forms of 3D elements and 2D imagery are designed to elevate the safety awareness of the users, enable them to predict and identify various types of hazards, and assess their level of severity. To fully document the experience of the users, during each exercise, trainees’ choices, time for decision-making and corresponding prevention plan are documented in the system. The complete process of design, development, implementation and results analysis of SAVES is presented.

Keywords: Safety,Training,Virtual Reality,Hazard Recognition

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf (1,048,469 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: convr:2013 (browse)
Cluster:
Class:
Similar papers:
Sound: N/A.


Dawood N, Sriprasert E, Mallasi Z, Scott D

An industrial evaluation of the virtual construction site (VIRCON) tools

Abstract: Implementation of the emerging information technologies in the construction industry has been relatively slow in comparison with other industries. Many research and development projects conducted by academia have not been tested and implemented successfully in the real practices. Considering this issue, the VIRtual CONstruction site (VIRCON) research project, funded by the UK government, was developed. VIRCON is a strategic decision support system for practical use to manage construction schedules, and in particular space planning. The successful development of the system was based upon the industrial requirements, real-life project data, and finally evaluated by the industrial collaborators. This paper briefly introduces the VIRCON system and thoroughly reports on the industrial user evaluation. The aims of the evaluation were to establish the usefulness and usability of the individual VIRCON tools, and to indicate the potential commercialisation and implementation of VIRCON tools in real practices. Ten collaborators from the construction industry evaluated VIRCON through a real-life case study. The space planning approach and visualisation features developed in this project were found practical and communicative.

Keywords:

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf (308,903 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2003 (browse)
Cluster:
Class:
Similar papers:
Sound: N/A.

Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by the University of Auckland. The assistance of the editor who provided the full texts and the structured metadata, Dr. Robert Amor, is gratefully appreciated.


Eastman C, Augenbroe F

Product modeling strategies for today and the future

Abstract: Today, there is a growing set of technologies being developed for information exchange in the construction industry. These range from Aspect Models in specific product areas to large scale integrated product models, to new languages such as EXPRESS-X and EXPRESS-2. The purpose of this paper is to sort out and review these various efforts, from several different perspectives: * in terms of what can be used now or in the near future in a production form; * in terms of the significant technical issues and limitations that may require generation changes in exchange technologies; * in terms of external business practices (reflecting case studies), practical benchmarks and adoption criteria, political and other externalities that are affecting these efforts. The survey will review the following issues: * current capabilities of ISO-STEP Part definitions to support information exchange in the building industry; * current efforts by IAI, BCCM in STEP, and other parallel activities and their potential contribution and pitfalls (problems to be overcome); * different current research efforts and the problems and solutions they identify, including COMBINE, EDM-2, VEGA, work at CIFE at Stanford University. Hitherto underdeveloped model aspects, such as capturing the semantics of the client's brief, or capturing design evolution (program, decisions and rationale), modeling performance assessments, and others such as relevant standards, construction site handling, etceteras will be reviewed and priorities assessed. Over the last ten years, the set of requirements that a building product model must meet in order to be accepted in practice as a significant 'productivity enhancement has incrementally expanded. That is, as various research goals have been set, then met, the true extent of the challenge for realizing production-based building product modeling has grown. We will review this expanding set of requirements and attempt to scope their final range. These requirements include, among other aspects: * 'semantic coverage', * level of interoperability across applications, * level of embedded project management control, and * maintained linkages to parallel 'unstructured' information flows, e.g. managed by Engineering Data Management and Document Management software. It will be argued that a viable growth scenario regarding the semantic coverage of building models is likely to be a determining factor in the way that CAD vendors will embrace these as the basis for developing the next generation of architectural CAD software. Priorities of development will be identified and compared with perceived market pulls. The perspective taken will emphasize the US point of view. However, we will endeavor to also weight significantly the European situation and efforts. The result of these perspectives will be to identify 2-3 scenarios of future evolution in the area of building product modeling, with an assessment of their likelihood of coming to be, and the critical issues needed to accomplish them.

Keywords:

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf (86,802 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:1998 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.store (0.031024) class.roadmaps (0.018975) class.strategies (0.018828)
Similar papers:
Sound: read aloud.

Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden. The assistance of the editors, Prof. Bo-Christer Björk and Dr. Adina Jägbeck, is gratefully appreciated.


Franklyn Chukwunonso

AFRICA IN CYBERCAFE

Abstract: The Internet has changed the world. Ask ten people what they love about the Internet and you will get ten different answers – e-mail, web surfing, entertainment, education, shopping, music, T.V., travel, online banking, chat. The list is endless. But terms like modem, browser, and portal can be daunting. There may be an estimated 800 million people using the Internet today, but that still leaves the vast majority of the world’s population unaware of the joys of cyberspace. So how difficult is it to log-on, tune in and download. This paper will attempt to answer questions such as “The Internet: what it is, how it works and what it promises for the future.

Keywords: Africa, Cyberspace, Internet, WWW

DOI:

Full text: content.doc (40,448 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: other (browse)
Cluster:
Class:
Similar papers:
Sound: N/A.


Franklyn Chukwunonso

AFRICA IN THE CYBER REVOLUTION

Abstract: The Internet has changed the world. Ask ten people what they love about the Internet and you will get ten different answers: e-mail, web-surging, entertainment, education, shopping, music, T.V, travel, online banking, and chat. The list is endless. But terms like modem, browser and portal can be daunting. There may be an estimated 800 million people using the Internet today, but that still leaves the vast majority of the world’s population unaware of the joys of cyberspace. This paper attempts to provide some of the answers to questions like what the Internet is, how it works, and what promise it holds for the future.

Keywords: Internet, Cyberspace, e-mail, web-surging, entertainment, education, shopping, music, T.V, travel, online banking, chat, modem, web browser, web portal, ICT, Information and Communication Technology, Information Technology, IT, Evaluating ICT, Effective Implementation of ICt, Nigeria, Nigerian Tertiary Institutions, Nigerian Universities, Nigerian Education, Tertiary Institutions, Tertiary Education, Universities, Role of ICT, Development of ICT, Implementation of ICT

DOI:

Full text: http://www.franklynonso.com (available to registered users only)

Series: other (browse)
Cluster:
Class:
Similar papers:
Sound: N/A.


G.B. Ozturk-Barlak, D. Arditi, H.M. Gunaydin, S. Kale & I.Yitmen

Factors Affecting the Learning Process of Professionals in Architectural Design Firms

Abstract: Learning is considered to be a sophisticated process and a source of competitive advantage. Learning is essential in project-based environments. The one-of-a-kind structure of the operations of architectural design firms triggers special learning needs and requires a continuous learning activity. Learning is considered to improve an architectural design firm’s efficiency by recognizing the role of individuals in enhancing the firm’s objectives. However, theoretical research on individual professionals’ learning process in the architectural design is rather uncommon. The process of individual learning is composed of (1) data acquisition (2) assessment of the acquired information and (3) implementation of the knowledge gained in a group setting. Ten factors were identified to assess the effectiveness of the learning processes of professionals. This study is the first study in the field of architecture that presents a conceptual model about the factors that affect the effectiveness of the learning process of professionals.

Keywords:

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf (429,484 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2009 (browse)
Cluster:
Class:
Similar papers:
Sound: N/A.


H Hofmeyer, N ten Heggeler

Structural topologies by iterative multi-load dependent structural grammars and separate volume fraction topology optimisation

Abstract:

Keywords:

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf (1,093,109 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2016 (browse)
Cluster:
Class:
Similar papers:
Sound: N/A.


For more results click below:

 

hosted by University of Ljubljana



includes

W78




© itc.scix.net 2003
this is page 1 show page 2 Home page of this database login Powered by SciX Open Publishing Services 1.002 February 16, 2003