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Timo Hartmann, Frank Neuberg, Martin Fischer

Integrating three-dimensional product models into engineering and construction project information platforms

Abstract: In the last couple of years, construction companies have invested in the development of engineering and construction project information platforms (ECPIP). ECPIPs store information items in databases on centralized serv-ers and enable project managers to track different versions of and relations between information items. However, most commercial ECPIPs do not support the duality of product and process management that is needed by the construction industry. With the emergence of three dimensional (3D) building information product models to support project man-agement this shortcoming of commercially available systems is becoming increasingly critical. This paper motivates this product-process management problem, addresses a number of emerging solutions, and proposes a conceptual ar-chitecture and development process towards ECPIPs.

Keywords: project management, 3D, building information model, communication platforms, product lifecycle man-agement

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Series: w78:2007 (browse)
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Timo Hartmann, Ju Gao and, Martin Fischer

An Analytical Model To Evaluate And Compare 3D/4D Modeling Productivity On Construction Projects

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Full text: content.pdf (406,296 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2006 (browse)
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Timo Hartmann

Detecting Design Conflicts Using Building Information Models: A Comparative Lab Experiment

Abstract: One of the applications of Building Information Modeling (BIM) is Clash Detection: The automated detection of clashes between different elements in a BIM. Clash detection helps design coordinators to detect inconsistencies between different sub-systems in early design stages that would, if not detected early, materialize in expensive change orders and delays during the construction stage. However, the existing automated Clash Detections technologies, even for rather simple building designs, usually provide a large amount of clashes of which only a very few are relevant. It is a time consuming and error prone process to filter out the relevant clashes that finally will cause change orders during installation.To help design coordinators to with filtering out only the relevant clashes, modelers should organize BIMs according to a system breakdown structure that allows a clear distinction between different systems. A good organized BIM then theoretically allows design coordinators to find the relevant clashes more efficient and more accurate by filtering out clashes between different systems that are known to cause expensive field change orders if they are not coordinated well. We tested this hypothesis with an experiment. We divided 44 undergraduate students in three groups that each had to conduct a Clash Detection. One group used 2D drawings, one group used a standard BIM, and one group used a with a system breakdown structure organized BIM. As expected, the results of this experiment show that students with the organized BIM detected the most relevant clashes. Interestingly, however, students who used the none organized BIM found less clashes than the students who only used the 2D drawings. Overall, these findings show that the application of automated clash detection technologies requires well organized input BIMs to provide an advantage over the traditional 2D drawing based design coordination process.

Keywords: BIM, design coordination, clash detection, system breakdown structure, lab experiment

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Series: w78:2010 (browse)
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Vasiliki Kondyli, Mehul Bhatt and Timo Hartmann

Towards People-Centred Precedents for Parametric Design: The Case of Wayfinding in Large-Scale Public Buildings

Abstract: Large-scale public buildings need to ensure an effective wayfinding performance for different user groups. Recent precedent based design approaches take spatial cognition into account by analysing the visuo-locomotive experience of users with the aim to interpret their behaviour and integrate it into a people-centred design. The paper focuses on the process from the analysis of precedents and the visuo-locomotive experience to the definition of design constraints that can be embedded into a parametric design for wayfinding. Primarily, we pursue a qualitative analysis of the visuo-locomotive experience of wayfinders in a healthcare built environment, with the use of cognitive-assistive and immersive/ virtual reality technologies. The outcome, presented through immersive reality, is correlated with the morphological analysis of the space and leads to precedents evaluation about design for wayfinding and the definition of new design constraints. The process is approached through an example, the environmental aspect of visual range. We conclude that this practice can overcome some of the experience based design practices of today but is not yet ingrained in the architectural and engineering design processes of public buildings.

Keywords: Precedent Based Design, Immersive Reality, Spatial Cognition, Wayfinding, People-Centred Parametric Design

DOI: https://doi.org/10.24928/JC3-2017/0205

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