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A Almohsen, Janaka Ruwanpura

Logistics Management in Construction Industry

Abstract: The construction industry is often slower to adopt new technologies than other industries. Yet the construction industry shall embrace these technologies sufficiently in order to keep up with advances in other trades. One of the most crucial elements in construction management is productivity. And the adopting of new technologies such as mobile-based application can increase construction project productivity in such areas as materials management, tool use time, and labour motivations. Most of these aspects have been thoroughly investigated in academia; however, logistics management and its contribution to construction productivity have been insufficiently investigated, especially with respect to the use of advanced technologies. In this paper, we propose to develop a new platform to utilize modern technologies in the construction industry. Hence, the main objective of this paper is to introduce mobile-based application technologies into construction industry that will improve construction productivity by enhancing logistics management practices. The use of this model will not only help increase productivity in the construction industry but also it will make this industry more competitive with other industries. In order to achieve the main the goal of the paper, different building construction sites have been selected from which to collect data using direct observation, interviews and questionnaires. In order to ensure a high quality result, all participants were selected based on their relationship to the subject being examined. By using the outcomes of the data analysis to identify a potential solution, a computerized logistical management model was developed to examine how to enhance construction productivity and to improve logistics management practices. Many positive opinions have been granted form different constriction experts. Facilitating the communications between such project participants as contactors, subcontractors and suppliers is another expected result. Also, the model would help in organizing the schedule for the use of such heavy equipment as cranes.

Keywords: logistics management, advanced mobile-based application technologies, construction materials and equipment.

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Series: w78:2011 (browse)
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Andreas Kunz, Stefan Dehlin, Tommaso Piazza, Morten Fjeld, and Thomas Olofsson

Collaborative Whiteboard: Towards Remote Collaboration and Interaction in Construction Design

Abstract: The need for improved interaction and sharing of information in construction projects has grown significantly in recent years, especially as projects have become ever more complex.The early design stage is of particular importance for the final results as most of the building lifecycle characteristics are committed at this stage and the opportunity to influence them decreases rapidly as the cost of making changes, or correcting design errors, increases dramatically. Recent advances in information technology offer methods and tools to meet this need. In view of this, CollaBoard – an interactive whiteboard for remote collaboration – was developed to support mixed, geographically distributed teams. Interconnected via a network, two or more system setups allow users to interact and share information over a common interactive vertical whiteboard. Superimposing the live video of the remote partner – “people on content” – also allows the transfer of Meta information such as gestures, et cetera; resulting in a more intuitively distributed collaborative teamwork. Based on technology such as CollaBoard, the envisioned outcome of our research is a system allowing experts from different disciplines to integrate and optimize lifecycle-related parameters into a new product. The resulting system will allow each expert to adjust his/her own set of parameters, giving access to a large database through intuitive interfaces. This article also discusses possible areas of application with focus on early design, recommends future development needs and provides a brief comparison to existing and state-of the-art systems. The development work includes interdisciplinary research and development and interdisciplinary collaboration between academia and industry.

Keywords: design process, lifecycle, remote collaboration, visualization technology, whiteboard

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Series: w78:2010 (browse)
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Babic N C, Rebolj D, Hanzic L, Tibaut A

Transfer of road product model usage from academia to practice

Abstract: In Civil Engineering Informatics Centre at the Faculty of Civil Engineering, we are engaged in product models of construction objects. In product models, we see the key for integration of life cycle activities in the construction of individual objects. These activities are being weakly connected. Working on it, we have been focusing specially in the road design field. In the past few years we have developed a road model, called MCT, which is based on geometric road design. As a part of this project we have also made an application prototype, that uses advantages of MCT and enables simple road data transfer among particular life cycle phases. Yet in the early stage of our research project we were aware that our findings have to be tested in practise as soon as possible. Project was funded in part by the government institution that controls road building in Slovenia. For this reason we expected the investor to animate contractors to exchange data with our model. Unfortunately our expectations were not completely fulfilled and therefore the model wasn't verified in practise. Since we believe our model can rationalise road building procedure, we decided to carry out some extra activities, which would stimulate model usage. Therefore we established direct contact with some contractors involved in specific road life cycle phases. This wasn't an easy job, because a great number of small organisations are involved. Contractor's work is usually very clearly defined and computer is just a tool that helps him to do it quicker and better. For this purpose some extra functional modules of Road life-cycle environment (RO) were made and the existing ones were conformed according to the contractors needs. Since contractors are already using particular software to support their engineering process, we also persuaded software producers to include MCT in their programs for road design. This way, we gained broad software support for our model. Article fully describes a road model MCT, Road life-cycle environment RO and especially our efforts to introduce MCT into engineering practise.

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Full text: content.pdf (137,514 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:1998 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.bestPractise (0.092140) class.processing (0.017632) class.education (0.016155)
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Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden. The assistance of the editors, Prof. Bo-Christer Bjrk and Dr. Adina Jgbeck, is gratefully appreciated.


Bedard C

The validation of integrated CAD in building engineering design

Abstract: The need and the urgency to develop integrated CAD software for building design are well established in industry and academia alike. The means and the approach to achieve this objective are however not soclear and do not meet with general agreement. Even the final product itself - integrated CAD - has different meanings for different people.Like other research groups in building studies, we have developed a number of integrated building design systems in the last few years thateffectively combine different activities and types of expertise in a unified approach. For these successful research initiatives, the fundamental issue of validation remains a very difficult one to answer properly. On the one hand, reference cases do not exist to benchmark the operation of an integrated system, as in the case of experimental or empirical processes. On the other hand, no clear guidelines have emergedyet from commercial software developers in the construction industry that claim to have achieved 'integrated CAD' as soon as some form of file transfer exists between an application software and a CAD package.From the study of some integrated CAD systems for building design recently developed in industry and at the CBS, this paper will attempt tocircumscribe the main aspects of the validation issue, e.g. what are the characteristics of integrated CAD ? what kind of performance is expected from such systems ? are current systems delivering what building design practitioners need ?

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Full text: content.pdf (426,635 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:1992 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.bestPractise (0.020523) class.education (0.013759) class.synthesis (0.011254)
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Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by Research Press of the National Research Council of Canada. The support of the editor, Dr. Dana Vanier, is gratefully appreciated.


Bingunath Ingirige, Ghassan Aouad

Awareness and usage of information standards in the uk construction industry: a survey by the SIENE network

Abstract: Developments in information standards and interoperability in the construction industry are becoming increasingly popular. Much of this development is centred on the Internet for sharing of information and generic data exchange. However many industry participants are unaware of the benefits of information standards and reluctant to make long-term investment on them unless there is clear evidence of business benefits. The Network on Information Standardisation, Exchanges and Management in Construction (SIENE) was launched in March 2000 to streamline information standardisation and interoperability in the construction industry. It is an international network consisting of academics and industry practitioners in the UK and elsewhere whose work on the subject is of international reputation. The project is funded by The Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) under The Innovative manufacturing Initiative (IMI). The main source of knowledge gathering is through workshops conducted in the UK. The website of SIENE also provides opportunity for the members and other participants to enhance the knowledge base of the network. SIENEs main objective is to explore current research being undertaken in the area of information standardisation and to benchmark UK performance with the rest of the world. It has also conducted workshops to investigate sources and types of barriers that prevent the adoption of information standards and to identify business benefits for construction firms. The findings of the project will be disseminated amongst industry and academia. The paper deals with the results of a questionnaire survey conducted by SIENE in the UK on awareness and usage of information standards among contractors, consultants, suppliers and clients in the construction industry. Forty members of the Construct IT, Centre of excellence in UK were selected as the initial target audience for the questionnaire survey. It is expected to broaden the scope of the survey to a wider audience in its second stage. The paper will discuss the information standards, which are widely being used in the UK construction industry and will highlight any organisational problems, which hinder the adoption of standards. It will also propose areas, which need to be improved for the firms in the industry to gain business benefits.

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Full text: content.pdf (385,336 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2001 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.strategies (0.031105) class.roadmaps (0.019768) class.commerce (0.017889)
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Permission to reproduce these documents have been graciously provided by CSIR Building and Construction Technology. The assistance of the editors, Mr. Gustav Coetzee and Mr. Frances Boshoff, is gratefully appreciated.


Dawood N, Sriprasert E, Mallasi Z, Scott D

An industrial evaluation of the virtual construction site (VIRCON) tools

Abstract: Implementation of the emerging information technologies in the construction industry has been relatively slow in comparison with other industries. Many research and development projects conducted by academia have not been tested and implemented successfully in the real practices. Considering this issue, the VIRtual CONstruction site (VIRCON) research project, funded by the UK government, was developed. VIRCON is a strategic decision support system for practical use to manage construction schedules, and in particular space planning. The successful development of the system was based upon the industrial requirements, real-life project data, and finally evaluated by the industrial collaborators. This paper briefly introduces the VIRCON system and thoroughly reports on the industrial user evaluation. The aims of the evaluation were to establish the usefulness and usability of the individual VIRCON tools, and to indicate the potential commercialisation and implementation of VIRCON tools in real practices. Ten collaborators from the construction industry evaluated VIRCON through a real-life case study. The space planning approach and visualisation features developed in this project were found practical and communicative.

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Full text: content.pdf (308,903 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2003 (browse)
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Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by the University of Auckland. The assistance of the editor who provided the full texts and the structured metadata, Dr. Robert Amor, is gratefully appreciated.


Hussain K,Choudhry R

Building information modeling (BIM) uses and applications in Pakistan construction industry

Abstract: Building Information Modeling (BIM) is one of the most promising and recent developments in the construction industry. In Pakistan, the studies on BIM in academia and construction industry are not very common. This work has tried to find out the potential for BIM for its use and applications in the construction industry. The objectives of this research were to assess the potential of BIM for its use and applications in designing, coordinating, managing and execution of construction projects, the main reasons to take interest in BIM and the major tasks for which it is considered to be adopted. The methodology of this research was based on a questionnaire survey to collect data. The collected data were analyzed by conducting different statistical procedures to make inferences. Results of this survey indicated that there was awareness about BIM technology and its processes among the construction industry stakeholders for better visualization and to increase the capacity of design reviews, constructability analysis, and model based estimation and construction sequencing. Results further indicate that the use of BIM minimizes risk of discrepancies between orthographic views including plan, section, and elevation and provides improvement in preparation of budgeting, cost estimating and scheduling capabilities. Finally, the results of this study provide useful information to clients, consultants, contractors and other stakeholders in the construction industry.

Keywords: Building Information Modeling (BIM),Questionnaire,Virtual Building Construction,Object-Oriented CAD Systems

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Series: convr:2013 (browse)
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Ken Thomas, Brian Graham, Tim McCarthy, Pat Troy, David Crowe

Making an Impact: Improving the use of ICT in a Leading Construction Company Through an Industry-Academia Partnership

Abstract: This paper concerns the improved use of ICT in a leading Irish construction company via an Industry-Academia partnership. The partners are Waterford Institute of Technology (WIT) and BAM Contractors, who are part of the wider Royal BAM Group based in the Netherlands. The bespoke MSc in Construction Project Management (MScCPM) programme that was developed through this partnership involves a number of modules, including one on ‘ICT in Construction’. The majority of the required assessments on the bespoke programme relate specifically to BAM business activities. BAM saw the benefits of getting the participant either individually or in groups to investigate issues that are of importance to the company. Each assessment was designed and agreed by the relevant WIT Module Leader and the associated BAM Expert in line with the agreed MScCPM framework. The processes of aligning the required programme assessments with topics and problems of direct interest to the company may not always have been straightforward, but the potential befits were clear to all concerned. In the case of the ‘ICT in Construction’ module the WIT Module Leader agreed the topics and approach with the BAM ICT Manager and his team. Essentially the group was divided up into six groups of three people and the other two participants were given individual projects. The group projects concerned the use of COINS, SharePoint, BIM, Project Planning software, ICT on Sites and Mobile ICT Devices. The individual projects related to the use of ICT in two other companies, BAM Nuttall and Suir Engineering. The background to these topics, how they were researched, the publication of the associated reports, the oral presentations to WIT and BAM Senior Management are described in this paper. Most importantly, the subsequent impact of these ICT projects on the BAM people, processes and technologies are also considered.

Keywords: ICT, Construction, Industry-Academia Partnership, Work-Integrated Learning

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Series: w78:2010 (browse)
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Kiroff L, Ostrowski P

It and E-architecture a technological breakthrough, a techno knowledge race or a new paradigm in business?

Abstract: The impact of Information Technology on the growth of the knowledge society is profound. In an era when human intellectual creativity is highly valued, IT is a powerful tool enabling the analysis and development of ideas and concepts. Regarding IT as a means to automate business tasks aiming at some labour savings would be an extremely simplistic approach to a more complex concept. Designing systems that augment user capabilities, encourage further exploration and foster creativity will enable users to do what they have not been able to do before. Business environments where collaborative work relationships flourish become highly successful in the intensely competitive global marketplace. The synergy between IT and teams working together to accomplish mutual goals becomes the key to organisational performance. The AEC (Architecture, Engineering and Construction) industry in particular is undergoing dramatic changes due to the pervasive use of networked computers and multimedia equipment. The advent of the first PCs in the architectural profession in the early 1980s gradually started adding a new element of complexity to the architects job. The essence of the architectural work is the teamwork environment and IT is able to facilitate the design process and make project collaborations effective. Our research focuses on IT and its impact on architectural team environments. Recent emerging trends that will be analysed include architecture firms collaborations on national and international projects (firms experts in particular building types associate with local or regional firms called architect of record commissioned for the contract documentation and the contract administration stages of the project). The Royal Sun Alliance Building, Metropolis Apartments, Botany Downs Shopping Centre, DFS Galleria (all in Auckland) are some NZ examples of international collaborations with the design coming from the USA and Australia and Auckland firms commissioned as architect of record. Such trends necessitate the use of new technologies like advanced digital communications and hence the unprecedented boom of project extranets, or project WEB sites, and the emergence of the WEB-based architecture. Highly sophisticated architectural environments are built around Intranets, Extranets, the Internet and Video Conferencing systems. This enables the integration of architectural design, business management and team collaborations through computer technology. As a consequence, traditional roles and responsibilities in an office environment will change dramatically with fewer lower level routine tasks being available. Continually updating skills through on-going education becomes a lifetime commitment for the highly qualified industry professionals and for the company as a whole. A large number of computer software applications become indispensable for the highly efficient everyday functioning of an office. Some of the most significant buildings of the 1990s like F. Gehrys Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao, Spain and S. Calatravas Extension for the Milwaukeess Art Museum, Wisconsin, USA couldnt have been made without CAD. Another interesting trend is the use of IT to define a building through its entire life cycle in a more comprehensive way. This covers not only the traditional design and construction phases of a project but also automated facilities management and even the buildings eventual demolition. Our research methodology encompasses an array of primary and secondary sources of information literature review, international case studies and projects both pre and post IT revolution, interviews with experienced industry professionals, hands-on experience demonstrating WEB based concepts in practice and individual professional expertise. Research Outcomes and Conclusions: Although technology has given us numerous new tools to be more productive and innovative creatively, the amount of quality architecture being designed may not necessarily increase. It is academia that drives innovative uses of technology not industry. Academia has more time and resources to experiment and is not at the mercy of the vendors vision or how technology can or should be used. Computing is in a never-ending flux. This change, for better or worse dynamically drives the way we do business. The entire industry must seek out these changes, create them, challenge them, foster, adopt or discard them to suit. As object oriented CAD becomes more pervasive, more value will be added to the construction documentation. This value-add needs to be recognised and exploited. As technology pervades, the design process, regardless, remains relatively the same. Hierarchical business models and decision-making processes are no longer the norm. This fosters an atmosphere of collaboration and employee empowerment. Talent is talent. Technology is no substitute for it.

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Full text: content.pdf (170,944 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2001 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.communication (0.044696) class.collaboration (0.038235) class.environment (0.034749)
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Permission to reproduce these documents have been graciously provided by CSIR Building and Construction Technology. The assistance of the editors, Mr. Gustav Coetzee and Mr. Frances Boshoff, is gratefully appreciated.


Lopes J L R

An investigation into the main information dimensions of corporate real estate management

Abstract: The fragmentation of the construction and real estate sectors, and the information intensive character of their activities, makes it very difficult to select, store and transfer relevant information among its members. The volume and diversity of data in these sectors have been a hindrance for developing effective, integrated and standardised information systems for construction, building and real estate management. To overcome these problems at the level of strategic management of corporate real estate, a research was set to elicit the main information dimensions, or the main concerns, within the area. This research used as paradigms models that succeeded on defining and using the main dimensions of a particular subject matter, facilitating communications, decision-support and learning processes. Examples of these paradigms are the main factors of production in the theory of capital in economics, the balanced scorecard and the critical success factors in organisational management, the three dimensions in project management and Pena's (1987) main concerns for programming in architecture. The research consisted of a content analysis of seventy corporate real estate management (CREM) models used in industry and academia eliciting the main features (concepts, tools, techniques, methods) quoted on these models. Using classification techniques and supported by a literature review and expert interviews, these features were classified according to their nature, similarities and origin. The main dimensions resulting from this classification system provided the main information dimensions in CREM. These dimensions are financial, physical and human, each one divided in three classes, respectively. The financial dimension is divided in the classes rentability, business information and intelligence. The physical dimension is divided in the classes data, management and diagnosis. Finally, the human dimension is divided in the classes organisation, occupancy and customer. Examples of uses of the CREM framework are given.

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Full text: content.pdf (72,776 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:1999 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.software development (0.021566) class.education (0.018527) class.strategies (0.016666)
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Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by the Research Press of the National Research Council of Canada. The support of the editors, particularly Dr. Dana Vanier, is gratefully appreciated.


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