Welcome
Digital library of construction informatics
and information technology in civil engineering and construction
 

Works 

Search Results

Facilitated by the SciX project

Hits 1 to 10 of 69

Message development in the building process

Abstract: New communication media offer new opportunities to exchange information between participants in a building project. A case study was done of a specific building project from the viewpoint of a company that produces concrete floors. An executable simulation model was used to create a formal description of the information exchange process. The output of the simulation is an activity schema, a message exchange diagram and a list of messages. The schemata give insight about the information flow and are a resource for developing a strategy for the introduction of electronic communication. The messages serve as a starting point for selecting a standardized electronic message or developing a special one.

Keywords:

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf (1,214,000 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:1995 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.communication (0.022605) class.synthesis (0.022488) class.collaboration (0.015924)
Similar papers:
Sound: read aloud.

Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by the Stanford University, USA. The support of the editors, particularly Prof. Fischer is gratefully appreciated.


A Ganah, G A John

Understanding BIM in the UK Construction Industry using an Activity Theory (AT) Approach

Abstract:

Keywords:

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf (108,112 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2016 (browse)
Cluster:
Class:
Similar papers:
Sound: N/A.


Aalami F, Fischer M

Joint product and process model elaboration based on construction method models

Abstract: In practice, construction planners need to plan and replan projects at several levels of detail and would like create 4D visualizations to communicate construction schedules. The current construction planning and scheduling process is , however, still largely manual and time-consuming, making it difficult to maintain an appropriate and realistic set of plans, schedules, and 4D visualizations throughout design and construction. Researchers have demonstrated the usefulness of a product model with a decomposition hierarchy and supported-by relationships between project components to generate a construction process model automatically. The product model's decomposition hierarchy supports the generation of hierarchical activities, and the supported-by relationships between components enable automated reasoning. However, the resulting process model is typically not a usable or realistic construction schedule, since activities can only be sequenced if elaborated to the same level of detail, and component-based activity elaboration is limited to the original product model. This paper discusses how a customizable and general representation of construction method models supports the transformation of a design-centric product model into a production-centric view. A formalized hierarchical construction planning process forms the basis of this translation process. The planning process is broken down into method-driven elaboration and hierarchical planning and scheduling steps. User-defined and user-selected construction method models drive the elaboration process by supplying the necessary activity and component elaboration knowledge. The product model undergoes a transformation from a design-centric decomposition to a production-centric decomposition. The elaborated activities are sequenced based on constraints that are passed on to the activities from their construction methods. The output of the planning process is a 4D production model. A 4D production model is a linked representation of an elaborated product and process models. A 4D production model is a flexible representation of the construction process that can support many views for communication and evaluation, e.g., 4D visualization, CPM-network, barchart, or resource histograms.

Keywords:

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf (289,626 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:1998 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.represent (0.035804) class.processing (0.027755) class.communication (0.018300)
Similar papers:
Sound: read aloud.

Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden. The assistance of the editors, Prof. Bo-Christer Björk and Dr. Adina Jägbeck, is gratefully appreciated.


Akbas R, Fischer M, Kunz J, Schwegler B

Use of domain knowledge, product models and geometric algorithms for generation of construction zones

Abstract: We present a layered approach for automated generation of construction zones from 3D CAD models for construction planning and scheduling. The existence of 3D models and product models provides an opportunity for planners and schedulers to consider zoning alternatives and represent and visualize production information in detail. Construction zones are spaces, or groups of spaces, which serve as units of work in the construction planning process. Failure to define construction zones properly may increase overall project duration and impact workflow adversely. Today, zone definitions are generally ad-hoc. Formal definitions and mechanisms to generate construction zone information are not available in commercially available software.We have defined a three-layer computational framework in a prototype construction management software tool to generate detailed information about construction zones. The framework separates the construction-based information from the product model representation and geometric information. Each layer is extensible and testable without the other layers. The highest layer (Layer3) contains domain knowledge about zones, i.e., types of zones and factors or constraints affecting construction zone definition. For example, a shape factor takes into account the changes in production rates due to local variations of geometry. The shape factor also allows the representation of an idle crew because of a nearby activity, missing support or unavailability of materials. Layer 2 manages the changes in the product and process models that are necessary to generate zones. Additionally, it uses zoning knowledge to maintain consistent schedules at multiple levels of detail. Layer 1 is the geometric level that contains the geometric algorithms to create the subdivisions and aggregations using the geometric shape representation of the building components. Instead of considering a fixed geometric representation for a component, we provide a flexible triangular mesh shape representation, breaking-up or aggregating component geometry as necessary. With the results of this research, professionals will be able to simulate and visualize construction processes more accurately and link design and construction data more tightly to explore design-build scenarios rapidly and communicate them effectively.

Keywords:

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf (1,076,021 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2001 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.impact (0.028985) class.environment (0.026386) class.represent (0.022098)
Similar papers:
Sound: read aloud.

Permission to reproduce these documents have been graciously provided by CSIR Building and Construction Technology. The assistance of the editors, Mr. Gustav Coetzee and Mr. Frances Boshoff, is gratefully appreciated.


Amirante I

Information technology teaching at the University: an experience at the Faculty of Architecture in Naples

Abstract: The experiences illustrated here refer to didactic activity carried out at the Faculty of Architecture of the University of Naples; in particular these concentrate on the technological aspects of the teaching of architecture. We can consider the evolution of the architect from individual operator to manager of the multi-disciplinary aspects of the building process (building process manager) as a reality in today's Italy. The Support Systems of Information Technology (ITSS), can be of great importance €or this professional figure, and for this reason it is important to include him/her in the teaching process. I personally have involved fourth and fifth year and last-year undergraduate students in the following subjects at the experimental stage: degradation diagnosis supported by m Expert System in courses of the Technology of Building Rehabilitation; co-ordinated System of tests in degradation of existing buildings; the use of three-dimensional programmes to survey and visualize rhe territory; rapid analysis of degradation in the maintenance of urban facades. * In these and other similar works I'TSS has played a significant part for a global synthesis in students' methodological approaches, being an inttoduc tion to new Information Technology potentialities.

Keywords:

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf (1,158,179 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:1993 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.education (0.036539) class.analysis (0.018067) class.synthesis (0.015849)
Similar papers:
Sound: read aloud.

Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by the National University of Singapore. The assistance of the editors, particularly Prof. Martin Betts, is gratefully appreciated.


Annie Guerriero, Gilles Halin, Sylvain Kubicki

INTEGRATING TRUST CONCEPTS IN A DASHBOARD INTENDED FOR THE BUILDING CONSTRUCTION COORDINATOR

Abstract: The growing complexity of AEC projects leads to increase the importance of the building construction coordinator’s role. Moreover, the uncertainty linked to the environment of the building construction activity makes way for the notion of trust. The coordinator canmake use of a multiple tools/views for accomplishing his mission (e.g. planning, meeting report) but these views offer only a limited vision of the cooperation context. So we suggest analyzing data coming from these different views to obtain some trust indicators informing the coordinator about trust in the good progress of the building construction activity. Our approach distinguishes 4 aspects of the activity conditioning the global trust level: task progress, actor’s performance, documents required to perform the task, and building elements resulting from the task. Our proposal suggests introducing these trust indicators in a dashboard included in a multi-view interface allowing the coordinator identifying the tasks with a low level of trust and understanding the nature of the potential dysfunctions.

Keywords: Building construction, Coordination, Trust, IT-support, Dashboard, Model-Driven Engineering

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf (484,486 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2008 (browse)
Cluster:
Class:
Similar papers:
Sound: N/A.


Annie Guerriero, Sylvain Kubicki, Gilles Halin

A model-based approach to develop a dashboard tool integrating trust concepts in AEC

Abstract: In the Architecture Engineering and Construction (AEC) sector, cooperation between actors is essential for project success. During the building construction activity, the organization of actors is both hierarchical, transver-sal and adhocratic. Moreover, the quality of cooperation is fundamentally influenced by the management of interde-pendences between tasks and between actors. In this context, the development of new assistance tools has to integrate these heterogeneous parameters relative to coordination and trust. We inspired about Model-Driven Engineering ap-proach to propose a models infrastructure integrating cooperation context modelling and views modelling. We develop on the basis of this infrastructure a dashboard dedicated to the building site coordinator. This tool currently in design stage provides indicators about the trust in the good progression of activity. Moreover, it would enable context under-standing by combining these indicators in a multi-views interface. Thus, the user could navigate in the context using multiple views like meeting report, planning, performance evaluation, or 3D mock-up, and obtain more information about a particular indicator.

Keywords: building construction, cooperation, coordination, trust, process modelling, dashboard, model-driven en-gineering

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf (1,622,431 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2007 (browse)
Cluster:
Class:
Similar papers:
Sound: N/A.


Aparna Perikamana, Steven K. Ayer, Michael A. Beauregard and Suleiman Alsafouri

Development of a Collaborative Process Mapping Activity to Improve Students' BIM Process Mapping Understanding

Abstract: The use of BIM has become increasingly common, which has led to a growing demand for construction professionals with BIM knowledge and skills. BIM education is a solution to meet this growing need. Prior research suggests students associate BIM with a software solution rather than as a process illustrating a need to modify the current educational paradigms. This paper explores a pedagogical approach to developing BIM process planning skills among construction students. The research extends the findings of prior work that tasked students with developing process maps in a peer-reviewed context. This current iteration of the research explores the use of a collaborative, team-based, activity to generate Level 1 and Level 2 process maps, as defined by a previously published BIM Project Execution Planning Guide. The students were asked to create the process maps individually at first, and then again in groups of three. Pre- and post-questionnaires were given to analyse the studentsÕ perception of their knowledge. The primary objective of the research was to elicit a perception based response with respect to (i) studentsÕ ability to create a process map, (ii) enhancing the learning process, and (iii) students' perception about their own knowledge of the BIM execution process. In addition to perception based questions, the authors made observational analysis of completed process maps. The studentsÕ confidence in their ability in creating a process mapping dialogue box appears to have increased because of the activity. However, the studentsÕ perception about their ability to arrange the activities in sequence and parallel and the ability to create process map did not have any significant improvement. Based on the questionnaires and the suggestions given, it can be concluded that in both activities, the students had difficulties understanding the process mapping language. Future research may address the implementation of new pedagogical methods, incorporating the findings identified in this research thereby improving the measurable outcome of the students understanding of Process Mapping specific to BIM implementation.

Keywords: BIM, BIM Process Mapping, BIM Education, Collaborative Activity

DOI: https://doi.org/10.24928/JC3-2017/0061

Full text: content.pdf (419,325 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: jc3:2017 (browse)
Cluster:
Class:
Similar papers:
Sound: N/A.


Arif A, Karam A

Architectural Practices and Their Use of IT in the Western Cape Province, South Africa

Abstract: The application of Information Technologies (IT) is moving forward with tremendous speed affecting all industries and professions; our building profession is no exception. To identify the extent of IT application in the building construction context of South Africa, a survey was conducted in the year 2000; it included IT as one of the many topics investigated. The Western Cape Province (WCP) was selected as the first subject of the ambitious national survey. The survey provides insight into the particular patterns in IT applications within the local architectural industry of the WCP and tracks its implications in terms of human resources and technical needs. This research paper presents a focused perspective of the findings of the survey on the local practices; their general profile, their computer technology profiles, their particular applications of technology and finally the effect of computer use on the profitability and cost reduction of their practices. The data presented in this paper highlights the high numbers of small-sized offices as a general characteristic of the local profile. Although a good percentage of these small offices seem to have a high need and use for IT applications, larger-sized offices are totally computerised and are all networked as well. The use of computers is clearly concentrated in three areas: administration, communication in addition to the core activity of construction drawings production. The survey reveals a major dependency on computer-aided-design (CAD) software where its use extends, in most cases, to clients' presentations. This dependency makes high demands on staff and principals' literacy and on the high competency levels needed for their use of technology. On the financial effect of IT use, many practices are not fully convinced that there is an actual reduction in their running costs. The exception occurs in the case of practices run by principals who use computers themselves; they have a positive perception of the financial benefits of technology. This research establishes a baseline from which to scale the progress in the use and application of IT in the architectural profession, being a key player in the construction industry. It serves as a measure for future surveys of the other provinces. It is hoped that it provides a foundation for many assumptions made by practitioners, technologists, consultants and educators of this field.

Keywords: Architecture - South Africa, Architectural Practices, Building Construction, Computer-Aided-Design (CAD), Survey - Cape Town

DOI:

Full text: http://www.itcon.org/2001/2 (available to registered users only)

Series: itcon:2001 (browse)
Cluster:
Class:
Similar papers:
Sound: read aloud.


Ayer S,Messner J,Anumba C

ecoCampus: a new approach to sustainable design education

Abstract: Civil and architectural engineering education programs strive to prepare students to design built environments that will be used by society. Some of these built systems can be challenging for laypeople to visualize while learning the design process. This research focuses on improving the way that students visualize and engage with building design content through the creation of a novel educational tool for designing sustainable building elements. The tool prototype, called ecoCampus, is an educational game that uses augmented reality technology on a mobile computing platform. It allows users to visualize a possible building retrofit design in the context of an existing built space and also receive tailored feedback about their design. The prototype application was tested with 47 first-year architectural engineering students to better understand the benefit of this tool. The results of this implementation were analyzed and compared to the results of prior semesters’ students who were tasked with completing a similar retrofit design activity without the use of ecoCampus or a mobile computing device. This comparison suggests that students who completed the ecoCampus activity were more likely to complete multiple design iterations as well as experiment with materials other than those present in the existing wall, suggesting that ecoCampus may help to break the tendency toward design fixation. Additionally, students generally rated the experience as highly enjoyable, suggesting engagement with this teaching tool. Future work will implement the ecoCampus experience with students in several building-related majors to identify possible additional benefits that can be observed.

Keywords: ecoCampus,Simulation Game,Augmented Reality,Engineering Education,Situated Learning Theory

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf (1,511,909 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: convr:2013 (browse)
Cluster:
Class:
Similar papers:
Sound: N/A.


For more results click below:

 

hosted by University of Ljubljana



includes

W78




© itc.scix.net 2003
this is page 1 show page 2 show page 3 show page 4 show page 5 show page 6 show page 7 Home page of this database login Powered by SciX Open Publishing Services 1.002 February 16, 2003