Welcome
Digital library of construction informatics
and information technology in civil engineering and construction
 

Works 

Search Results

Facilitated by the SciX project

Hits 1 to 10 of 62

A Lähr & K-U Bletzinger

Prediction of consequences for planning situation based decisions

Abstract: Consequences of a decision made by a planner (e.g. a project manager, or an engineer) within a collaborative environment can hardly be foreseen. For example, such a collaborative scenario is represented by a planning process in AEC. In particular, during certain planning stages alternatives have to be considered which significantly influence the overall result. Todays AEC planning procedures can be very much improved by predicting simulation methods to judge about the quality impact of certain design or planning modifications. Also, the proper interpretation of data is very crucial to give suitable insight into the characteristic consequences of individual planning decisions. This contribution presents an approach to achieve this goal by discussing needs, problems and implementation for the actual state of our research.

Keywords:

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf (972,202 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2005 (browse)
Cluster:
Class:
Similar papers:
Sound: N/A.

Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by the Technische Universität Dresden.


Alkass S, El-Moslmani K, AlHussein M

A computer model for selecting equipment for earthmoving operations using queuing theory

Abstract: This paper presents a computer model “FLSELECTOR” for equipment fleet selection for earthmoving operations. The methodology based on the queuing theory is incorporated in a computer module to account for the uncertainties in that are normally associated with the equipment selection process. FLSELECTOR is capable of assisting the users in making decisions required for earthmoving operations, such as determining the size and number of trucks and excavators, haul road lengths and surface conditions, etc…These decisions are based on the calculated output for all feasible fleets. An actual case study is presented in order to illustrate the effectiveness and performance of the FLSELECTOR in comparison with the simulation method

Keywords:

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf (237,842 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2003 (browse)
Cluster:
Class:
Similar papers:
Sound: N/A.

Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by the University of Auckland. The assistance of the editor who provided the full texts and the structured metadata, Dr. Robert Amor, is gratefully appreciated.


Anders Robertson, Rogier Jongeling, Anders Ekholm, Thomas Olofsson, Alain Zarli

Investigations in the BICT project of state-of-the-art ICT for industrialization of house building processes

Abstract: The research presented here is part of a project named BICT, ”Evaluation of benefits of ICT for the indus-trialization of project and product processes in the construction industry”. Its overall objective is to establish a mutual understanding between the construction industry and R&D actors of the needs and possibilities of ICT. The project is a cooperative effort between Swedish and French researchers and industry representatives within the EraBuild program. It includes an investigation of the processes and ICT tools in a representative house building project, together with a study of the State-of-the-Art of ICT for immediate, short and medium term uptake. This paper presents the main results of the State-of-the-Art study with specific focus on: - Visualization and coordination using digital mock-ups of 3D models; - Model based quantity take-off; - Integration of applications for product design; - Reuse of experience based knowledge. The presented study concludes that the use of integrated 3D applications must be introduced early in the project lifecy-cle in order to pave the way for the use of object-oriented information in downstream processes. This requires common standards for 3D based deliveries developed in cooperation between industry and R&D actors through joint analyses of actual information management both in industrialised partnering-like processes, and fully industrial building proc-esses.

Keywords: construction processes, house building, industrialization, ICT, digital mock-ups, model based quantity take-off, integration of applications

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf (748,792 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2007 (browse)
Cluster:
Class:
Similar papers:
Sound: N/A.


Arif A, Karam A

Architectural Practices and Their Use of IT in the Western Cape Province, South Africa

Abstract: The application of Information Technologies (IT) is moving forward with tremendous speed affecting all industries and professions; our building profession is no exception. To identify the extent of IT application in the building construction context of South Africa, a survey was conducted in the year 2000; it included IT as one of the many topics investigated. The Western Cape Province (WCP) was selected as the first subject of the ambitious national survey. The survey provides insight into the particular patterns in IT applications within the local architectural industry of the WCP and tracks its implications in terms of human resources and technical needs. This research paper presents a focused perspective of the findings of the survey on the local practices; their general profile, their computer technology profiles, their particular applications of technology and finally the effect of computer use on the profitability and cost reduction of their practices. The data presented in this paper highlights the high numbers of small-sized offices as a general characteristic of the local profile. Although a good percentage of these small offices seem to have a high need and use for IT applications, larger-sized offices are totally computerised and are all networked as well. The use of computers is clearly concentrated in three areas: administration, communication in addition to the core activity of construction drawings production. The survey reveals a major dependency on computer-aided-design (CAD) software where its use extends, in most cases, to clients' presentations. This dependency makes high demands on staff and principals' literacy and on the high competency levels needed for their use of technology. On the financial effect of IT use, many practices are not fully convinced that there is an actual reduction in their running costs. The exception occurs in the case of practices run by principals who use computers themselves; they have a positive perception of the financial benefits of technology. This research establishes a baseline from which to scale the progress in the use and application of IT in the architectural profession, being a key player in the construction industry. It serves as a measure for future surveys of the other provinces. It is hoped that it provides a foundation for many assumptions made by practitioners, technologists, consultants and educators of this field.

Keywords: Architecture - South Africa, Architectural Practices, Building Construction, Computer-Aided-Design (CAD), Survey - Cape Town

DOI:

Full text: http://www.itcon.org/2001/2 (available to registered users only)

Series: itcon:2001 (browse)
Cluster:
Class:
Similar papers:
Sound: read aloud.


Augenbroe G L M

Enterprise integration of future building design systems

Abstract: The paper deals with the project and enterprise environment of integrated building design systems (IBDS), such as the one targeted in the European collaborative research project COMBINE. "he research has concentrated on the concept of a set of separate actors, grouped around a common data repository. Its deliverable consists of the first large-sized fully implemented conceptual building model. The actual data exchange is realized by STEP interfaces supported through a COMBINE interface kit. The resulting prototype was demonstrated in a workshop with design practitioners. The second phase of COMBINE has started recently and will build upon the above deliverables by combining them into an operational system, according to functional specifications derived with the help of practitioners in typical design office settings.

Keywords: information modelling; CAD; building design; design management; enterprise management

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf (737,868 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:1993 (browse)
Cluster:
Class:
Similar papers:
Sound: read aloud.

Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by the National University of Singapore. The assistance of the editors, particularly Prof. Martin Betts, is gratefully appreciated.


B de Vries

Building management simulation center

Abstract: Introduction to the BMSC In the Building Management Simulation Center new and experienced construction managers are trained. The center is unique because of the use of a virtual building site that can be inspected by the trainees. The actual status of the building and of the building materials and equipment on the building site is simulated by the system dependent on the trainee’s actions. The main part of the center is the simulation hall. Here, ten cabins are located with a view on a large parabolic projection screen. The trainee has to execute tasks in the cabin in an environment that is familiar to him/her. On the projection screen the building under construction can be viewed and it can be inspected by navigation through the full-scale model. Similar VR based training systems can be found in the aircraft industry, the automotive industry [http://www.ttsl.co.uk/home.htm] en de shipbuilding industry [http://thor.sv.vt.edu/crane/]. These examples inspired the initiators of the BMSC to investigate if the same methodology could be used in the building industry. Building site activity patterns Construction process simulation research has mainly been focused on the development of a construction planning analysis tool [e.g. V.R. Kamat, J.C. Martinez in proceedings of CIT2000]. In the BMSC though, interaction between the construction manager and the building on the building site will steer the construction process simulation. Investigations on the building site and discussions with experienced construction managers learned that they work in fixed patterns. A pattern consisting of a list of activities is called a transition type. These transition types describe all kinds of procedures that a construction manager performs to fulfill a specific tasks (e.g. ordering of new material). Transition types also take into account actions required to perform corrections beforehand or afterwards. For a specific case the transitions were entered into the system. The transitions were deduced from the construction managers that had worked on that building project when it was actually built. For the training purposes every possible situation the trainee can end up with has to be covered by the transitions. The interactive 3D training system The trainee’s actions are logged by a kind of Electronic Data Management System. All documents that are created during a training session are stored in the system. The system itself also contains project information that can be consulted. Finally the system offers an interface to communicate with the other participants in the project. After the training session that consists of the execution of a set of tasks, the system has stored all actions, their order and the produced documents. These data are compared with the predefined transitions for the case that was used. The document contents are compared with the predefined activity results. With this method it is easy to detect if the trainee missed certain activities in a transition and if the information is consistent. Finally, a visual feedback can be created be regeneration the 3D model in the VR environment in accordance with the trainee’s actions. The 3D model will show has far the building could have been built successfully. The learning effect After the training session the trainee will be confronted with the (possible) mismatch between has own actions and the preferred actions following from the predefined transitions. Evidently this is discussed during the evaluation after the training. Recognition of the right transition by the trainee to solve a specific task is considered one of the major learning effects of a BMSC training. Paper Outline In the paper the software architecture of the system will be explained. The activity patterns and the management of the system are discussed in more detail. A layout of the building where the BMSC is hosted is presented. Finally some examples of the training sessions will illustrate how the BMSC operates in practice and an overview will be presented of the first experiences.

Keywords:

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf (1,053,282 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2001 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.deployment (0.027827) class.man-software (0.018630) class.communication (0.013308)
Similar papers:
Sound: read aloud.

Permission to reproduce these documents have been graciously provided by CSIR Building and Construction Technology. The assistance of the editors, Mr. Gustav Coetzee and Mr. Frances Boshoff, is gratefully appreciated.


Christiansen T, Thomsen J

CAESAR - an architecture for enterprise modelling in the aec industry

Abstract: This paper reviews work in progress concerning information modelling in support of enterprise engineering, and discuses how important modelling challenges are being addressed to support more cost effective development of offshore installations for oil production in the Norwegian part of the North Sea. The paper describes a framework and a methodology for information modelling of real world project enterprises and presents initial application examples from the offshore oil and gas industry. CAESAR Offshore is a research program undertaken jointly by Norwegian oil companies, engineering ms, research institutions and the Norwegian Research Council, with the aim of utilising information-technology-based methods and tools which lead to more cost effective field development and operation. As a part of CAESAR Offshore we are developing an object oriented system architecture consisting of a framework and methodology for information modelling, based on our belief that complete and correct enterprise models of development projects must include both the project requirements, deliverables, activities and organisation. Thus information models of projects must represent both the objective, product, process and organisation dimensions. Based upon a model of engineering design, we explicate and relate the enterprise dimensions, and outline a way of describing the difference between planned action and actual behaviour. We implement our model architecture according to an information meta-model, based on a set of common reference entities, and a general offshore reference model. In our work we are using the offshore reference model, as the basis for modelling offshore platforms, design of hydraulic system for offshore production units, and project control systems for engineering design projects.

Keywords:

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf (2,790,144 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:1994 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.software development (0.023123) class.represent (0.009418) class.economic (0.008181)
Similar papers:
Sound: read aloud.

Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by VTT, Espoo, Finland.


Christiansson P, Svidt K, Ove Skjarbek J, Aaholm R

User requirements modelling and design of collaborative virtual reality design systems

Abstract: Advanced Information Technology today gives us the opportunity to implement sophisticated distributed systems for collaborative design. Persons with different interests and competencies in the building process such as architects, installation engineers, structural engineers, clients, builders can all at least theoretically be brought together in a distributed design space where a virtual building will be designed, build, and functionally evaluated. A design space build in a virtual reality environment will enable us to realistically and efficiently simulate the form, function, and construction of the building object under consideration. In this connection we made the following definition of a Virtual Workspace. 'The Virtual Workspace, VW, is actually the new design room designed to fit new and existing design routines. VW may well be a mixed reality environment. The VW will host all design partners from project start with different access and visibility (for persons and groups) in space and time to the project, and will promote building up shared values in projects. The VW thus acts as a communication space with project information support in adapted appearances. VW gives access to general and specific IT-tools ' The paper presents experiences from the early phases of user requirements formulations and design of such collaborative design spaces. The findings are mainly based on collaborative university and consultant engineering company work done in the EU project 'Distributed Virtual Workspace for enhancing Communication within the Construction Industry - DIVERCITY' as well as experiences from student collaboration in distributed learning environments and earlier research within the area. It is extremely important to bridge the gap between the user requirements specifications and the actual interface design and implementation of the underlying operational models of the distributed virtual workspace system. This is certainly true as we actually design a new type of design artefact that will highly influence the traditional working methods and integration of design resources. The early conceptual design of the virtual workspace follows the so called Contextual Design methodology which gives input to the subsequent data modelling work and implementation in an object oriented web distributed environment. The method used is described and examples on resulting Work Models (work flow, sequence and artefact models) are presented and commented on.

Keywords:

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf (634,867 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2001 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.communication (0.065624) class.deployment (0.022154) class.environment (0.022092)
Similar papers:
Sound: read aloud.

Permission to reproduce these documents have been graciously provided by CSIR Building and Construction Technology. The assistance of the editors, Mr. Gustav Coetzee and Mr. Frances Boshoff, is gratefully appreciated.


Ciftcioglu O, Durmisevic S, Sariyildiz S

Soft computing in construction information technology

Abstract: Purpose: With this paper a data driven model of knowledge representation for use in construction information technology (CIT) is introduced as a novel implementation and it is effectively implemented by artificial intelligence methods. Although for CIT knowledge base systems as a general framework is available where the user can place the information. Such systems are eventually mere data warehouses or in a more sophisticated form they are decision support systems in the form of rule based expert systems. However, in the case of a framework structure to organise the knowledge base is difficult and cumbersome task to establish an effective product. In the case expert systems, the inference is deductive and therefore the effectiveness of the system is limited to the prescribed rules. Therefore in place of high level data base management software like Prolog ©, the integration of new computational information processing methods and technologies into CIT would be much informative and therefore they are much effective and finally desirable. From the viewpoint of computation, CIT the data are rather soft requiring special methods and techniques to deal with. In this respect, computational intelligence is one of the emerging technologies, which provides CIT with ample possibilities and techniques for the enhancement of CIT products. Computational intelligence is a part of artificial intelligence (AI) and can be defined as a branch of soft computing methodologies including Expert Systems, Fuzzy Logic, Artificial Neural Networks and Evolutionary Computation. Methodology: For the CIT data soft computing methods are invoked. Soft Computing is an emerging approach to computing which parallels the remarkable ability of the human mind to reason and learn in an environment of uncertainty and imprecision. In plain terms, it is the processing of uncertain information with the methods, methodologies, and paradigms of artificial NN, fuzzy logic and evolutionary algorithms. The equivalence of neural networks and fuzzy logic applications is well established. However, the effectiveness of either method is still dependent on the application itself. Each method has its strong merits. However, in general, best performance is obtained when both methods are used in hybrid form. Especially neural system can cope with complex systems while it is relatively difficult for fuzzy systems. On the contrary, it is easier to deal with linguistic variables by fuzzy systems. Such a hybrid model is implemented in the knowledge model accomplished. Results: A novel concept of soft computing in CIT is introduced using actual building design data for design evaluation. The knowledge base contains all the local and global information and their inherent relationships among themselves. The knowledge representation is performed by means of a series of fuzzy systems having their both fuzzy input space and output space. The associations between the spaces are established by learning techniques of AI using the data at hand. Such an 'intelligent' knowledge base can make inference resulting in 'intelligent' due outcomes, which are not explicitly coded, in advance. In other words this is an inductive and computational inference for decision-making compared to conventional knowledge base systems where inference is deductive prescribed by rules. Conclusions: The soft computing in CIT is an important step for processing the relevant effectively and efficiently. In this respect, the paper describes ongoing advanced research and its verifications by actual data at hand.

Keywords:

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf (204,669 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2001 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.analysis (0.064489) class.synthesis (0.025964) class.deployment (0.019220)
Similar papers:
Sound: read aloud.

Permission to reproduce these documents have been graciously provided by CSIR Building and Construction Technology. The assistance of the editors, Mr. Gustav Coetzee and Mr. Frances Boshoff, is gratefully appreciated.


Clarke P, Clarke J

Analysis of phenomenological perceptions of effectiveness of information technology in computerised maintenance management

Abstract: The general aim of this empirical research was to examine the phenomenological perceptions of both asset managers and support or ancillary staff using qualitative and quantitative analysis for the purpose of assessing efficiency of information technology in a public sector building construction maintenance management environment, particularly to develop a framework technique that will be useful to investigate such fundamental phenomenological facets as efficiency of training and information technology, the effect of information technology on human relations within the workplace, the perceived impact of information technology on the efficiency of occupational performance, and a summative evaluation of information technology in the asset management environment. Empirical investigation by structured interview with both management and support staff within a public sector asset management organisation was undertaken. The data was analysed through unpaired t-tests between asset managers and support staff, and dichotomous questions for experienced versus inexperienced employees and employees as differentiated by age. The results of the analysis revealed that both asset managers and support staff perceive information technology as beneficial in terms of both qualitative and quantitative outcomes. Further it would appear that individually at all levels within the maintenance management sphere exhibited phenomenological perceptions of information technology that were particularly favourable and overall were consistent with the conclusions of researchers who had observed information technology's benefits in terms of other quantitative and qualitative outcomes, in industry. Further research is suggested in the areas of customer satisfaction both prior to and subsequent to the implementation of more sophisticated information technology systems in addition to investigating the interaction between actual productivity levels and phenomenological perceptions of beneficial outcomes as a function of information technology.

Keywords:

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf (63,348 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:1999 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.environment (0.043979) class.impact (0.034129) class.economic (0.021698)
Similar papers:
Sound: read aloud.

Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by the Research Press of the National Research Council of Canada. The support of the editors, particularly Dr. Dana Vanier, is gratefully appreciated.


For more results click below:

 

hosted by University of Ljubljana



includes

W78




© itc.scix.net 2003
this is page 1 show page 2 show page 3 show page 4 show page 5 show page 6 show page 7 Home page of this database login Powered by SciX Open Publishing Services 1.002 February 16, 2003