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A decision support system for building refurbishment design

Abstract: "Refurbishment work in the EC currently accounts for more than one-third of the total construction output. This market is expected to grow stronger with the progressive ageing of buildings and the environment impetus to retain buildings. A further dimension is the need to adapt buildings for a greying population. There are important differences between refurbishment and new construction works. The existing building constraints the design solutions, construction technologies and work methods. Mechanisation, planning, and efficient organisation of refurbishment work is difficult, due to the small, labour intensive, and ad hoc, dynamic nature of the work. Also due to the relatively small scale of refurbishment projects, there have been no opportunities for standardisation and the applications of prefabrication and industrialisation are limited. Today, larger sized contractors are rapidly moving into the refurbishment market, in response to the shrinking new-build market and the higher technological demands of large scale refurbishment projects. The EC funded Brite Euram project 4670 is titled ‘Decision Support Systems for Building Refurbishment.’ This project has started in August 1998 and will finish in July 2001. Its objective is to develop a socio-technological-commercial framework and corresponding Decision Support Systems (DSSs) for housing refurbishment, to achieve: ? refurbishments which are more focused on user requirements; ? refurbishment designs which take into account the constraints of the existing building structure; ? increased incorporation of industrialised systems and components; ? organisational procedures and production technologies that recognise the unique nature of refurbishment work. The project is divided into three tasks. Task one aims at developing a DSS for the determination of the refurbishment demand and ballpark costs. Task two involves the development of a DSS for refurbishment design. Task three will result in a DSS for refurbishment process planning and control. This paper describes the approach followed for the ongoing development in task two, the DSS for refurbishment design. The main objectives of this task are to provide decision support at the project level. It will develop a database of layouts of representative existing housing estates and a database of preferred refurbishment layouts for these representative existing housing estates. Another database will be developed containing information on building systems and components that are relevant for the refurbishment process. Task two will establish a protocol for refurbishment design support. This protocol, which is implemented in a decision support information system, involves a number of steps that aid the user in selecting an appropriate housing layout and building systems and components that meet the user’s requirements. These steps involve the evaluation of a the user’s refurbishment demands and selection of a matching representative existing housing layout. Based on further dialog with the system, a preferred refurbishment layout is selected, which in turn is used as the basis for the selection of building systems and components that meet the performance requirements as stated by the user. The paper describes the methodology that is implemented in the system for retrieving performance requirements from the user, and the approaches for matching these to the stock of existing and preferred housing layouts available in the system’s database. The system is characterised by a flexible architecture of both the databases and the user interface, which results in a scalable system that allows the expansion of the databases with new graphical layouts and building systems and components, as well as the addition of new kinds of performance requirements. The system is implemented as an Internet application, which allows the database to be maintained centrally and facilitates world wide access to the system. The system’s implementation involves the combination of graphical and non-graphical data that can be queried and matched with only typical Internet browsing software installed at the client-side."

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Series: w78:2000 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.man-software (0.029035) class.environment (0.012122) class.impact (0.010657)
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Permission to reproduce these documents have been graciously provided by Icelandic Building Research Institute. The assistance of the editor, Mr. Gudni Gudnason, is gratefully appreciated


, Jagbeck A, Karstila K

Concurrent engineering in the tendering process of building and construction

Abstract: CONCUR (Concurrent Design and Engineering in Building and Civil Engineering) is a four year initiative in the European Union Brite-EuRam workprogramme involving industry partners Skanska (Se), IVO Power Engineering (Fi) and Taylor Woodrow (UK), the specification body STABU (Nl), R and D institutions VTT (Fi) and TNO (Nl), and universities DUT (Nl) and KTH (Se). The project will develop, implement and industrially deploy an integrated CAx environment for concurrent construction tendering. CONCUR is addressing the integration of information in the stages which lead to submission of tenders. The goal is to reduce tendering cost by 30 - 50% using integrated information systems and applications. The tendering process is a complex process involving many disciplines each of which uses different types of information. . In essence it is an information refinement process, in each refinement cycle addressing the high risk aspects of the moment. In CONCUR we are addressing the integrated use of information and applications, using Project (Product and Process) Data Technology Using the major informational items the refinement process will come to information specifications. The specifications being derived are not re-invented but use is made of existing and emerging standards such as STEP and IAI. Results of the CONCUR efforts can be fed back to STEP and IAI.

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Full text: content.pdf (84,538 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:1998 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.represent (0.023671) class.environment (0.015688) class.impact (0.011018)
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Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden. The assistance of the editors, Prof. Bo-Christer Björk and Dr. Adina Jägbeck, is gratefully appreciated.


A Cemesova, Y Rezgui, C J. Hopfe

Possibilities and challenges created by a smart material in building performance simulation

Abstract: Smart materials are predicted to ‘revolutionise’ the A/E/C industry. They are supposed to enable a building to change colour, shape, size and opacity. However, past research shows that smart materials are still not used very often in engineering applications to their full potential. In this publication we advocate that materials should not be only chosen for simple properties such as visual, physical and insulating characteristics, but for capabilities such as being able to save/generate energy, store information, and to react to stimuli from their local environment. Therefore, this paper will research into the addition of SolaVeil to a window, its physical configuration and the possibility to model and analyse it through Building Performance simulation (BPS). This material is primarily designed to eliminate glare and redirect light. As a result it can reduce energy use caused by air conditioning and artificial lighting systems. This paper researches into the behaviour of SolaVeil in a computer simulation using two different case studies. The first will compare how changing the width but maintaining the reflective area affects illuminance distribution, and the second will determine which physical properties of SolaVeil are most effective. Finally, conclusions are drawn based on the case studies and it is shown that smaller width light shelves are the most suitable for an anti glare product. It is also determined that for SolaVeil to minimise glare in a room without compromising illuminance levels, it should have a light shelf angle of 40 degrees, cover between 40-60% of a window and its strips should be spaced 5mm.

Keywords: SolaVeil, smart materials, building system design, illumination.

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Series: w78:2011 (browse)
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A Grilo, R Jardim-Gonçalves & A Steiger-Garcao

Shifting the construction interoperability paradigm, in the advent of Service Oriented and Model Driven Architectures

Abstract: A major difficulty construction companies are currently facing is the lack of interoperability of software applications to manage and progress in their business. Organizations are being pressured up by new business relationships, driven for instance by new contractual challenges, which the exchange of information and documents with new partners are often incapable of being executed automatically and in electronic format. This is principally due to problems of incompatibility with the information representation adopted by the software applications they are working with. This problem arises not only during the project phase but also across the whole life cycle that includes operation and maintenance stages. In order to create the enabling conditions for the deployment of the electronic collaborative and commerce platforms it is fundamental to understand the variables that may influence its development, and how they determine the configuration of the e-platform. This paper, after present technology driven standards for the construction industry data management, it proposes the adoption of the emerging Service Oriented and Model Driven Architectures to shift forward the interoperability paradigm in this industrial sector. The paper illustrates some scenarios where significant impact is expected when adopting the proposed methodology.

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Full text: content.pdf (374,582 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2005 (browse)
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Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by the Technische Universität Dresden.


A Guerriero, S Kubicki, L Schwartz

Design and assessment of prospective mobile services for construction

Abstract: Mobile applications become more and more used in both private and professional activities.Innovation through mobile services specification and prototyping becomes a major trend inconstruction sector research. The project presented in this paper aims both at demonstrating theinterest of mobile technologies for assisting building construction coordination and to elicitate themost interesting and common requirements of construction practitioners for this type of application.Then the paper focuses on the method used for specifying basic requirements and the experimentalprotocol setup for assessing the developed prototype. The main outputs are a set of specifications and aprototype of mobile application as well as a method for defining experimental protocols in a context ofservice-based innovation. The prospects envisage considering context-aware mechanisms for therecommendation of mobile services to construction practitioners.

Keywords: Construction management, Mobile computing, Mobile service prototyping, Experiment protocol.

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Series: w78:2011 (browse)
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A Kiviniemi & J Haymaker

Integration of Multiple Product Models

Abstract: The development of the Industry Foundation Classes (IFC) started from the vision that an integrated building product model would cover all necessary information for a buildings’ entire lifecycle: from requirements management, through different design processes to construction and maintenance processes. Although the IFC model specification covers a substantial part of the required information, AEC projects still have encountered many problems putting this model into practice. AEC professionals still find it difficult to have dynamic, lossless, truly effective data flow amongst the different participants and applications. It is obvious that file based data exchange alone is not a feasible solution - some other solution for integrating project information is necessary. This workshop discusses some viewpoints and potential solutions to the above issues and problems.

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Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by the Technische Universität Dresden.


A Kiviniemi, M Fischer & V Bazjanac

Multi-model Environment: Links between Objects in Different Building Models

Abstract: The current IFC specifications include relations between objects and enable representation of complex structures in a building product model. However, several research projects have addressed the problem of one integrated model by pointing out the different content and structure of different design domains. The existing software products cannot support all features of the IFC specifications, and because of the structure of AEC industry there are no potential customers for applications which would cover all different information needs. We believe that there will be several instantiated models representing a building project, and these models share some parts of the information which must be linked between the models. However, IFC specifications do not enable links between objects in separate instantiated models. This paper will (1) discuss the reasons for the separation of instantiated models, (2) present the necessary extensions of the IFC specifications, (3) include examples of the links between the requirements model and architectural design model, and (4) discuss some possibilities how to implement this link in a model server environment.

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Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by the Technische Universität Dresden.


A Kiviniemi, M Fischer & V Bazjanac

Integration of Multiple Product Models: IFC Model Servers as a Potential Solution

Abstract: The development of the Industry Foundation Classes (IFC) started from the vision of an integrated building product model which would cover all necessary information for buildings' whole lifecycle: requirements management, different design activities and construction and maintenance processes. Although the IFC model specification covers a substantial part of the required information its implementations into practical applications have shown several serious problems. One of the main problems is that the internal structures of the different software products do not support the information needs for the whole process. Thus, the idea of lossless, incremental data flow through the different applications used by the project participants has not come true. It is obvious that file based data exchange is not feasible solution, and some other solution for integrated project data model is necessary for the AEC industry. This paper discusses some viewpoints and potential solutions to the above problem.

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Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by the Technische Universität Dresden.


A Löfgren

Socio-technical management of collaborative mobile computing in construction

Abstract: The constant changes of plan and unanticipated events in the production process at construction sites result in communication patterns that are dynamic, spontaneous and informal. Most of the existing ICT tools do not sufficiently support informal communication for powerful collaborative problem-solving, management of site resources, handling of parallel process activities and do not correspond to the basic needs and work patterns at the construction sites. Mobile computing technologies have the potential to provide an inclusive wireless mobile ICT platform (voice and data) that can enable improved support for informal communication and on-demand data at construction sites, which can result in improved project collaboration leading to increased efficiency and productivity in the construction process. Still, an implementation strategy for collaborative mobile computing at construction sites is complex and must consider numerous issues regarding system capabilities, mobility, applications, services, integration of existing ICT systems, user interface and user devices to meet the requirements and behaviors of site workers in the mobile distributed heterogeneous construction environment. A mobile computing platform needs to be designed, implemented and managed with a socio-technical bottom-up approach realizing end user and group needs, understanding the separate issues of adoption on different organizational levels, and recognizing mobile computing as a process integrated enabling technology for improving collaboration and project communication throughout the whole construction process.

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Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by the Technische Universität Dresden.


A Redmond, A Hore, R West, J Underwood, M Alshawi

Developing a Horizontal Integrated Life Cycle Costing Analysis Model through BIM

Abstract: Advancing interoperability between design team applications has been a major challenge for advocates of open standards. The buildingSmart alliance and Open Geospatial Consortium Inc in the U.S. have developed and implemented an Architecture, Engineering, Construction, Owner Operator, Phase 1 Testbed that streamlines communications between parties at the conceptual design phase to establish an early understanding of the tradeoffs between construction cost and energy efficiency. The results of this Testbed combined with an on-going collaborative R&D project ‘Inpro’ co-funded by the European Commission to identify business and legal issues of Building Information Modeling in construction were used as theoretical propositions underlying a 2010 Delphi survey. This paper presents the results of one questionnaire of that overall study. It is anticipated that these results will contribute to (i) identifying the most appropriate applications for advancing interoperability at the early design stage, (ii) detecting the most severe barriers of BIM implementation from a business and legal viewpoint, (iii) examining the need for standards to address information exchange between design team, (iv) exploring the use of the most common interfaces for exchanging information, and (v) investigating the industry’s perception on whether the development of a Cloud based BIM Life Cycle Costing would be of significant use to the Irish and UK construction industry. The rationale for this research is to refine the results of the initial questionnaire, AECOO-1, and Inpro R&D projects in order to determine if a prototype based on developing a cloud integrated LCC model through BIM could be generated in the UK and, Ireland and if so, what would be the legalities of implementing such a project.

Keywords: Cloud, BIM, Information Exchange, Interoperability, LCC

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Series: w78:2011 (browse)
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