Welcome
Digital library of construction informatics
and information technology in civil engineering and construction
 

Works 

Search Results

Facilitated by the SciX project

Hits 11 to 20 of 36

G Dori, M Wild, A Borrmann, O Fischer

A System Model for Lifecycle Monitoring of Bridges

Abstract:

Keywords:

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf (342,233 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2013 (browse)
Cluster:
Class:
Similar papers:
Sound: N/A.


Hauch P

One-dimensional CAD-drawing - twentyfive years en route towards integrated modelling.

Abstract: It all started twenty years ago with the implementation of industrial and mechanical CAD-drawing systems in the Construction Industry. Even at that time we focused on the wonderful perspectives of integrating design, production processes and FM using integrated systems, based on a "digital building model" and "object oriented modelling". The vision and the goals for the use of IT in the Construction Industry have been extremely stable over the years - much more stable than the development of IT. For many practical reasons we started out by focusing on drawings and on building bridges between the "islands of automation" in the construction industry. Data exchange between CAD-systems was on the agendas for some years. But why are we still fighting the challenges of file-exchange between loosely coupled systems, and why do we still base industrial practices on the document management concept, when comparable industries have left this concept long ago? We thought, that the concept of file-exchange between loosely coupled systems would bring us closer to realising our final goals - but how far have we progressed? Are we closer to integrated modelling today? How far have we progressed when it comes to implementation in the industry? The author takes a close look at the development and the use of IT in practice in the Danish Construction Industry and in numerous development programmes. He summarises on the lessons learnt in different areas like: Industrial IT- strategy, ITand CAD-solutions, conditions for integration, workflow, collaboration and business culture in the Construction Industry. He relates to the development in other industrial areas and to the development of IT-systems and tools to support the concept of integrated modelling and points at development needs. The author elaborates on the ideas of information modelling in 1D-, 2D-, 3D-,4D-, and up to 8D (?), dealing with three dimensions, properties, relations, space, place and time, and asks the question, if we have to go through all these steps to reach our goal. The conclusion is, that the industry is facing a shift in paradigm in order to fulfil its goals on integrated modelling, and that there is no easy way. The more we focus on file-exchange between loosely coupled systems and on the document management concept the further we must travel, and the greater the risk, that we will never reach our goal.

Keywords:

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf (26,980 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2002 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.store (0.026678) class.communication (0.021686) class.deployment (0.018597)
Similar papers:
Sound: read aloud.

Permission to reproduce these documents have been graciously provided by the Aarhus School of Architecture, Denmark. The assistnace of the editor, Prof. Kristian Agger, is gratefully aprecciated.


Helmicki A, Aktan A, Barrish R, Gao Y, Hunt V, Iyer S, Levi A

Interface design for pc-based real-time tele-remote operation of an instrumented bridge condition monitoring system

Abstract: For the past 4 years a multidisciplinary team of researchers at the University of Cincinnati Infrastructure Institute (UCII) has been studying the development of instrumented monitoring based condition assessment methods by making use of two fully operational reinforced concrete deck on steel stringer bridges in the Cincinnati, OH area. The instrumentation packages allow for the measurement of ambient conditions, as well as low frequency and high frequency components of structurally related signals. In addition, each bridge is equipped with a weigh-in-motion (WIM) scale which allows the weight and speed of all vehicles crossing the bridge to be monitored. All measurements are recorded by a PC- based data acquisition system. Both bridges are tele-remotely operable from laboratories at UCll via standard telephondmodem connections and custom designed software forming a user friendly data acquisition system interface. This paper reports on the current status of the research effort behind the development of the monitor and its associated user interface.

Keywords:

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf ( bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: ecce:1997 (browse)
Cluster:
Class:
Similar papers:
Sound: N/A.


Howard R

A new Danish classification system to meet local needs and link to international and IT developments

Abstract: Denmark is a small country with few large companies in construction, but the industry is well organized, makes advanced use of IT, and is capable of designing and constructing high quality buildings and huge bridges. It was an early user of the SfB building classification system and there are many well-organized sets of data, but it does not have a complete framework for building information meeting new international standards and reflecting developments in IT. The Centre Contract Building Classification is a 3 year collaboration project funded by the Building and Industry ministry and managed by the Technological Institute. It will finish at the end of 2002 with proposals for tables of building elements, schedules of rates and building products. The research at DTU was completed at the end of 2001 and looked at international experience and the effects of future IT systems. While a Danish system must relate to the specific needs and experience of Danish industry, and allow convergence with existing sets of data, it must also relate to international developments to maintain collaboration with other countries and export of building materials. Future IT systems will allow even more sharing of data and members of a project team, wherever they are located, should have a common understanding of the structure of the data they share. Standards such as IFCs for building modeling and ISO 12006-2 for building information, are important and experience from other countries shows that it is necessary to test the Danish proposals against these and set up suitable arrangements for promoting and supporting the new classification. It will also be necessary to educate students and mid-career professionals in the use of a new system.

Keywords:

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf (538,955 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2002 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.communication (0.040741) class.standards (0.019440) class.represent (0.013401)
Similar papers:
Sound: read aloud.

Permission to reproduce these documents have been graciously provided by the Aarhus School of Architecture, Denmark. The assistnace of the editor, Prof. Kristian Agger, is gratefully aprecciated.


Ipek Gursel, Rudi Stouffs, Sevil Sariyildiz

A computational framework for integration of performance information during the building lifecycle

Abstract: Optimal indoor environments in terms of thermal comfort and indoor air quality are essential to maintain healthy and productive spaces. To address the high occupant comfort and energy efficiency requirements, advanced HVAC systems that have narrow performance boundaries are used. It is crucial to achieve the satisfactory operational level for systems and buildings by the adoption of performance based verification strategies. Performance-based approach requires the continuous verification of the actual performance against objectives during the building lifecycle. Building commissioning, building energy management systems (BEMS) and operations and main-tenance are effective tools to verify optimum building performance and have the potential to embed performance as-sessment into the building lifecycle. However, transfer of performance information from one method or building phase to another is difficult. A considerable amount of valuable information is lost due to the lack of an integrated framework that bridges different islands of information. This becomes most problematic during the operational phase, where de-sign data and performance trends are the main basis for decision making for facilities management staff. To achieve a persistent performance evaluation across phases and stakeholders, a flexible and seamless communication infrastruc-ture across disciplines and processes is necessary. The software architecture for a continuous performance verification and communication environment for indoor cli-mate and ventilation systems is introduced. The purpose of the model is to provide a framework that integrates commis-sioning, BEMS monitoring and inspection/maintenance activities, to avoid erosion of domain information during hand-overs and over time. The model retains continual information of building and makes this information available during building operations and [re]commissioning. A formal relationship structure is proposed between performance indices to support traceability of design and operations decisions. The paper will be concluded with reflections into the future work, which includes implementation and proposed strategies for validation of the model by test cases.

Keywords: building lifecycle performance assessment, building commissioning, BEMS

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf (741,211 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2007 (browse)
Cluster:
Class:
Similar papers:
Sound: N/A.


Jiwen Zhang, Tim Taylor, Roy Sturgill, Gabe Dadi and Nikiforos Stamatiadis

Predictive Risk Modeling of Differential Bridge Settlement

Abstract: Differential settlement between the roadway pavement resting on embankment fill and the bridge abutment built on more rigid foundation often creates a bump when driving from roadway to bridge, and vice versa. This paper studies the problem at a macroscopic level by determining a method to predict the levels of approach settlement to assist designers in developing remediation plans during project development to minimize the lifecycle costs of bridge bump repairs. A macro method considering a combination of maintenance times, maintenance measures, and observed settlement was used to classify the differential settlement scale as minimal, moderate, and severe. A set of project characteristics including approach, abutment type, embankment, foundation, and traffic volume that may influence the formation of differential settlement were identified and used as parameters to develop a model to predict the settlement severity for a given approach. Logistic regression analyses were implemented to identify the relationships between the levels of differential settlement and the input variables for a sample of 600 randomly selected bridges in Kentucky. Geographic region, approach age, average daily traffic, and the use of approach slabs are identified as the four most predominant factors that can significantly affect the formation of differential settlement. Based on the performance of bridge approaches in Kentucky, how those parameters interacted in the prediction model is illustrated in the logistic regressions.

Keywords: Differential Settlement, Logistic Regression, Prediction Model

DOI: https://doi.org/10.24928/JC3-2017/0060

Full text: content.pdf (338,728 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: jc3:2017 (browse)
Cluster:
Class:
Similar papers:
Sound: N/A.


Kenzo Baba, Takao Eto, Masao Hisato

Monitoring system on the honshu-shikoku bridges

Abstract: The monitoring system is to measure the weather and structural conditions of a bridge. The measured data are logged in a database, and at the same time, processed by a personal computer to obtain a primary result of analysis. The database would also be used for more precise analyses, including a statistical one to review the design method and work out more reasonable one. This paper introduces the outline of the monitoring system, highlighting on the actual application which was employed in the Honshu-Shikoku Bridges.

Keywords:

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf ( bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: ecce:1997 (browse)
Cluster:
Class:
Similar papers:
Sound: N/A.


M Zhou, X-X Ning, J-S Fan, J-G Nie, X-G Yang

4D Multi-Scale Analysis of the Hybrid Zone for Cable-Stayed Bridges with Steel-Concrete Hybrid Girders

Abstract:

Keywords:

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf (403,505 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2014 (browse)
Cluster:
Class:
Similar papers:
Sound: N/A.


Martinez J C

EarthMover - simulation tool for earthwork planning

Abstract: Earthwork projects are performed in an environment fraught with uncertainty and using expensive machines that interact in complex ways. While the planning of these projects can be improved significantly with discrete-event simulation modeling, most projects are still planned using traditional tools. Recent advances in general-purpose simulation tools for construction operations modeling, such as STROBOSCOPE, enable accurate and detailed modeling of any complex operation. These tools, however, demand a level of training that is beyond that which can be found in most current construction practitioners. Special-purpose simulators bring the benefits of simulation modeling to users with little or no training by providing a modeling environment that is very close to the problem and geared towards a narrow domain. This paper presents EarthMover, a special-purpose simulation-modeling tool for planning and estimating earth-moving operations. The paper explores the use of EarthMover as a state-of-the-art simulation-modeling tool that allows construction practitioners to model complex earthwork operations in detail. EarthMover supports model definition via an interactive graphical interface where users drag and drop elements such as road segments, bridges, and loading and hauling units. In addition, EarthMover produces static and dynamic output. The static output includes numerous graphs and tables that describe the performance of the system in detail. The dynamic output includes an animation of the simulated system where the loading and hauling units can be seen moving about the site as they perform construction. The animation serves as a verification, validation, presentation, and credibility tool. The paper also presents the tools and techniques that were used to build EarthMover. These tools and techniques can be readily used to build other special-purpose simulators for building construction as well as for other types of heavy construction. The tools include STROBOSCOPE as a simulation engine, Visio for the graphical and interactive model definition, and Proof Animation for the dynamic output. The techniques include Visual Basic programming and OLE automation.

Keywords:

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf (120,295 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:1998 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.man-software (0.033643) class.environment (0.010932) class.strategies (0.006121)
Similar papers:
Sound: read aloud.

Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden. The assistance of the editors, Prof. Bo-Christer Björk and Dr. Adina Jägbeck, is gratefully appreciated.


Miles J, Foley A, Moore L

Metaphors and cost significance in a conceptual design decision support system

Abstract: "Currently in the research community, there are a number of styles of conceptual design software being developed. This paper describes the development of a Decision Support System (DSS) which belongs to that class of systems where the search is undertaken by the user with the software providing information and answers. Industrial evaluation by the authors and others has shown that such a style of interaction is well received by practising designers provided that the algorithms and processes used are sufficiently transparent for them to understand and have confidence in the way that the system reaches derives its answers. The system which forms the subject of this paper fully conforms to the above, with all algorithms, constraints and rules being easily accessible to the user. The system is known by the acronym COSTEST. COSTEST provides facilities for the designer to undertake the conceptual design of beam / slab bridges to a far higher level of accuracy than is possible with current practice. It includes facilities for sizing the super and sub-structures as well as FE analysis, a cost estimation routine, a database of structural sizes and material properties and the ability to produce a simple general arrangement and a client report. To enable the user to navigate through the system, understand what facilities are available and what their significance is, the user interface has been structured using the metaphor of the design office. The interface is arranged as a corridor off which are facilities such as a superstructure design office, an estimator’s office, etc. These are arranged around a direct manipulation representation of the sectional general arrangement. It is postulated that such an arrangement reduces the distance between the user’s way of thinking about the design problem and the system’s representation, thus making the system easier to use. Such Visual Interactive Modelling of the domain has been shown to allow users to use the software to learn about their own subjective values while dealing with the technical issues. The cost estimation component of COSTEST is based on the concept that for any bridge 80% of the total cost is contained in the 20% of items that are most cost significant. This idea has been developed by Horner but further analysis of existing bridges was undertaken as part of this work. The result is a simple cost model which is easy to use and yet far more accurate than current conceptual design practice. In particular it allows an accurate comparison to be made between options. COSTEST has been developed in conjunction with a number of practising bridge designers and the final system has been evaluated both by these people and other independent designers. The results of the evaluation are generally positive."

Keywords:

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf (276,555 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2000 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.man-software (0.056510) class.bestPractise (0.043429) class.economic (0.015023)
Similar papers:
Sound: read aloud.

Permission to reproduce these documents have been graciously provided by Icelandic Building Research Institute. The assistance of the editor, Mr. Gudni Gudnason, is gratefully appreciated


For more results click below:

 

hosted by University of Ljubljana



includes

W78




© itc.scix.net 2003
show page 1 this is page 2 show page 3 show page 4 Home page of this database login Powered by SciX Open Publishing Services 1.002 February 16, 2003