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Bjork B C

The impact of electronic document management on construction information management

Abstract: This paper deals with the introduction of electronic document management (EDM) technology in the construction industry, and our current research knowledge about this topic. EDM has the potential to enhance the information management in construction projects considerably, without radical changes to current practice. Over the past fifteen years this topic has been overshadowed by building product modelling in the construction IT research world, but at present EDM is quickly being introduced in practice, in particular in bigger projects. Often this is done in the form of third party ASP services available over the World Wide Web. In the paper a typology of research questions and methods is presented, which can be used to position the individual research efforts which are surveyed in the paper. Questions dealt with include: What features should EMD systems have? How much are they used? Are there benefits from use and how should these be measured? What are the barriers to wide-spread adoption? Which technical questions need to be solved? Is there scope for standardisation? How will the market for such systems evolve?

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Full text: content.pdf (84,211 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2002 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.store (0.036219) class.environment (0.033025) class.impact (0.032159)
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Permission to reproduce these documents have been graciously provided by the Aarhus School of Architecture, Denmark. The assistnace of the editor, Prof. Kristian Agger, is gratefully aprecciated.


Björk B-C, Turk Z

A Survey on the Impact of the Internet on Scientific Publishing in Construction IT and Construction Management

Abstract: The World Wide Web provides the opportunity for a radically changed and much more efficient communication process for scientific results. A survey in the closely related domains of construction information technology and construction management was conducted in February 2000, aimed at measuring to what extent these opportunities are already changing the scientific information exchange and how researchers feel about the changes. The paper presents the results based on 236 replies to an extensive Web based questionnaire. 65% of the respondents stated their primary research interest as IT in A/E/C and 20% as construction management and economics. The questions dealt with how researchers find, access and read different sources; how much and what publications they read; how often and to which conferences they travel; how much they publish, and what are the criteria for where they eventually decide to publish. Some of the questions confronted traditional and electronic publishing with one final section dedicated to opinions about electronic publishing. According to the survey researchers already download half of the material that they read digitally from the Web. The most popular method for retrieving an interesting publication is downloading it for free from the author's or publisher's website. Researchers are not particularly willing to pay for electronic scientific publications. There is much support for a scenario of electronic journals available totally freely on the Web, where the costs could be covered by for instance professional societies or the publishing university. The shift that the Web is causing seems to be towards the "just in time" reading of literature. Also, frequent users of the Web rely less on scientific publications and tend to read fewer articles. If available with little effort, papers published in traditional journals are preferred; if not, the papers should be on the Web. In these circumstances, the role of paper-based journals published by established publishers is shifting from the core "information exchange" to the building of authors' prestige. The respondents feel they should build up their reputations by publishing in journals and relevant conferences, but then make their work freely available on the Web.

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Full text: http://www.itcon.org/2000/5 (available to registered users only)

Series: itcon:2000 (browse)
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Boshoff N, Coetzee G

The use of electronic commerce in the materials procurement in SA construction industry

Abstract: South Africa is facing the challenge of providing housing and infrastructure to millions of its residents. The improvement of the construction process to enable and improve delivery of such scale, is of paramount importance to the industry. The paper focuses on the use of Internet enabled electronic commerce in the procurement of building materials. The CSIR in South Africa is developing a product "Eze-build" in collaboration with the construction industry, IT companies and the major banks. Eze-build consists of a core building product library, tender management and bill of materials systems integrated with an Internet enabled ordering and payment gateway. Eze-build gives contracting companies access to building materials suppliers via the Internet for the ordering and payment of building materials from a pre-compiled bill of materials.Eze-build provides materials suppliers, contractors and construction managers an easy to use tool that improves the overall management of materials procurement significantly. It also improve site processes since the procurement of materials can now be pre-scheduled and delivery of materials can occur on a just in time basis reducing materials storage and wastage significantly. Specific items addressed in the paper includes: A process analysis of Eze-build and the related changes in the construction management process. 1. The technologies used to implement Eze-build. 2. A brief description of the project including: * the merging of these diverse technologies to develop an integrated materials procurement solution for the construction industry; and * some of the difficulties that are encountered during the roll out of such a integrated system in the construction industry.

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Full text: content.pdf (51,611 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:1998 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.commerce (0.029106) class.store (0.024954) class.communication (0.023370)
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Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden. The assistance of the editors, Prof. Bo-Christer Björk and Dr. Adina Jägbeck, is gratefully appreciated.


Brandon P, Watson I

An expert system for strategic maintenance planning

Abstract: Recent changes in legislation have made housing associations (HAs) more financially responsible for all aspects of maintenance of their new housing stock. Because of the levels of funding within HAs and the need to provide accommodation at a "fair rent,"the planning of maintenance, and the consequent planning of expenditure has never before been so vital. Moreover, most literature on maintenance, including government reports and research by professional bodies or academic institutions, identifies a need for improvement in decision making regarding building maintenance. The project has provided an expert system (ES) that assists maintenance and finance officers in strategic planning of maintenance. The system (called EMMY) is not a database for HAs building stock and their tenants, or a program that itemises maintenance jobs, handles invoices, and performs various accounting tasks. It is a strategic management tool. Whilethere are many programs in existence that estimate the life-cycle costs of buildings or provide maintenance management, they all share two major problems: They require voluminous data input to describe each building; They function as "black boxes;" that is, data is put in and answers are given with little indication ofhowthe answers were generated and what variables affected the results. Storing all the relevant information in a database and selecting only that information required for the building under consideration is one method of reducing data input. In this way one can construct a modelof the building from pre-packaged components, and calculations can then be performed using spreadsheets. This approach has the advantage ofreducing data input and being relatively low cost (Tuts 89). Althoughthere is avariety of computer software available to the industry, thetechnology with potentially the greatest benefits is still the least known and most rarely used - the ES. ESs can directly address both of the problems outlined above: by reducing t

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Full text: content.pdf (930,794 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:1992 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.strategies (0.055604) class.social (0.033963) class.synthesis (0.021859)
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Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by Research Press of the National Research Council of Canada. The support of the editor, Dr. Dana Vanier, is gratefully appreciated.


C Argiolas, F Melis, E Quaquero

Knowledge management in building process

Abstract: Over the last few years, the management and organizational aspects of the construction process have undergone a profound reflection that is closely linked to the development and the clear changes in the market. Such market is characterized by a rapid change, a strong growth in technology, and by a widespread and transparent information. International character, knowledge and innovation are key elements to win an increasingly exasperated competition. Moreover, the growing complexity of the construction sector - due both to the rapid proliferation of products and innovative technical solutions, and to the need to take into consideration side, but not secondary, aspects of the object (environmental impact, energy efficiency, durability, safety, etc.) - points out that present management patterns of the construction process are no longer appropriate to the context in which one operates. Therefore, the construction sector faces an inevitable process of growth in which knowledge is an indispensable resource. The present article aims at showing how Knowledge Management techniques (KM) might represent a possible tool to assist in achieving such goals through a rational organization of large amounts of data and through a corporate use of the knowledge that characterizes the various stages of a building process.

Keywords: knowledge management, building process, interoperability, collaborative design

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Full text: content.pdf (259,667 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2011 (browse)
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Class:
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Choukry M A

Measuring building change: a method to capture building knowledge

Abstract: Buildings are subject to change of requirements didring their periods of use. In the last decades it has been mostly assumed that the rate of change is increasing. Exact description of the type of change or the aniount of change is not always investigated. Requirements change knowledge in currently used buildings is lacking. A method is required that identifies empirical building change knowledge. Identification of changes in buildings has the objective of examining if the empirical change could be useful in forecast change in newly designed buildings. The rest of the paper is organized as follows: Section 1 overviews general knowledge and buildiiig knowledge, Section 2 identifies and structures requirement change knowledge. Element change knowledge is strucbred and described in section 3. A change measurement method is introduced in section 4. Empirical analysis application to the change method is explained in section 5. A tool prototype in section 6 shows how change knowledge is captured from existing buildings and made useful to forecast change in new designs.

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Full text: content.pdf (2,057,217 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:1993 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.analysis (0.012132) class.bestPractise (0.010879) class.education (0.007293)
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Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by the National University of Singapore. The assistance of the editors, particularly Prof. Martin Betts, is gratefully appreciated.


Christensen L C, Christiansen T R, Jin Y, Kunz J, Levitt R E

Extending enterprise modeling beyond engineering - a life cycle model of hydraulic systems

Abstract: In our work on enterprise engineering we are concerned with developing a fiamework and methodology for modeling real world enterprise. Our primary concern is that the resulting enterprise models should give insight into the operation of today's enterprise, and allow systematic studies to predict likely effects of proposed changes. Last year, at the CIB W78 workshop in Helsinki, we presented an initial overview of CAESAR, an architecture for enterprise modeling in the AEC industry. CAESAR addresses the Objectives, Product, Process and Organization (OPPO) aspects of enterprise, and covers the complete life-cycle, including requirements specification, conceptual design, detailed engineering, approval, fabrication/ installation, operation, maintenance, and decommissioning. This year we apply the CAESAR framework to develop a simple model of a hydraulic system for oil production facilities. Such hydraulic systems are used for a variety of control tasks on offshore platforms, where different users have a range of different functional and operational requirements. We use the hydraulic system model to derive measures of coordination load, which may be used as input to simulate project execution as a set of information processing tasks. The Virtual Design Team OT) discrete event simulator is used to predict changes in development schedule and life-cycle cost due to changes in scheduling and execution of design and development.

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Full text: content.pdf (1,091,173 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:1995 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.processing (0.017132) class.impact (0.011087) class.economic (0.007888)
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Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by the Stanford University, USA. The support of the editors, particularly Prof. Fischer is gratefully appreciated.


Christiansson P

Dynamic knowledge nets in a changing building process

Abstract: Hypotheses and explanation models are put forward about the future global structure manipulation and transfer of knowledge. The so called Dynamic knowledge Nets, DKN, are defined and used to explain changes for the next generation of computerized communication and knowledgehandling systems. More and more powerful tools become available to model and visualize different parts of our reality. These tools will influence our possibilities to create useful models and will also have a great impact on how these models are integrated and accessed. Behind the interfaces dwell more and more capable integrated knowledge representations which are closely related to pertinent search strategies. It is now possible in a changing building process to create models which bring about a clearer and more obvious connection between the applications, our intentions and the computer stored models. The systems we are formulating today may thus provide us with dramatically better communication tools as communication rooms, personal "telescreens", and virtual realities. We must formulate and try out new concepts. New tools for building, using and maintaining the next generation systems have been and are continuously created and tested at the KBS- MEDIA LAB (knowledge based systems - media) at Lund University. Examples are given outgoing from ongoing research mainly the Material and Vendor Information and Building Maintenance Systems as well as Decision Support at theBuilding Site. These systems can shortly be described as multi agent environments with multimedia context dependent user interfaces to underlying facts bases.

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Full text: content.pdf (2,277,177 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:1992 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.man-software (0.046718) class.environment (0.034346) class.bestPractise (0.026216)
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Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by Research Press of the National Research Council of Canada. The support of the editor, Dr. Dana Vanier, is gratefully appreciated.


Christiansson P

IT in distributed open learning environments

Abstract: "The paper describes, accounts experiences, and analyses ongoing open IT supported education's at Aalborg University. The requirements and properties of distributed learning systems are explained as well as available IT-tools support and requirements on underlying application and user models. Pedagogical models are developed to support project organized problem based learning environments. Students are situated at different places in Denmark and meet in person once a month during a weekend seminar. New learning IT tools are introduced to support self study, project work, self tests, project delivery, and course administration. The open Master of IT education and IT courses in the Civil Engineering and Architecture and Design curricula are used as examples for discussions on course information content and structure, and personalized IT tools and their properties. Our conclusions are that we are only in the beginning of development of cross-disciplinary university courses in a global setting with highly communicative IT tools in contrast to traditionally open environments. It is also concluded that IT supported distributed learning provides us with excellent possibilities to advance the learning methodologies suitable for life long learning and to render existing courses more effective. There is a great need to raise the IT competence of the teachers to meet the needs for and carrying through of the changes in education on all levels. We will in the future see a closer natural collaboration between universities in course development and experience exchange."

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Full text: content.pdf (290,092 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2000 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.deployment (0.064533) class.education (0.052856) class.communication (0.041303)
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Permission to reproduce these documents have been graciously provided by Icelandic Building Research Institute. The assistance of the editor, Mr. Gudni Gudnason, is gratefully appreciated


Dawson A D

The virtual building - the implications of its preparation during the design process

Abstract: This paper examines the impact of the preparation of the virtual building as an outcome of the design process. The implications for the design practitioner working in an environment in which a virtual building model is prepared and tested prior to commencement of construction are discussed. Changes to the current organisational structure of the design process are suggested if a move is to be made toward an integrated virtual building construction and performance modelling environment.

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Full text: content.pdf (78,531 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:1999 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.environment (0.083308) class.impact (0.048539) class.analysis (0.024846)
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Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by the Research Press of the National Research Council of Canada. The support of the editors, particularly Dr. Dana Vanier, is gratefully appreciated.


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