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A Hore, F Cullen, R Montague, K Thomas

ADVANCING THE USE OF BIM THROUGH A GOVERNMENT FUNDED CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY COMPETENCY CENTRE IN IRELAND

Abstract: The main aim of this paper is to develop the early case for a new Competence Centre dedicated to industry led research in the Irish construction industry. It incorporates the results of a survey carried out by the Construction IT Aliance (CITA) and also identifies similiar centres carrying out industry led research around the world. Results from the survey show a clear support for the establishment of such a centre in Ireland and, in particular, a strong interest in Building Information Modelling (BIM) as a immediate priority research area. BIM is having a profound effect worldwide on the construction industry. The development and adoption of BIM technologies is in parallel with other major changes relating to project procurement approaches, such as Integrated Project Delivery (IPD), and the general sustainability agenda. Although slow to take off in Ireland to-date, BIM is becoming extremely relevant in other countries, with over 50% adoption in the United States and an average of 36% in Europe. The authors argue that a government funded Competence Centre will facilitate the Irish construction industry in re-establishing itself, domestically and internationally as a competitive entity.

Keywords: Building Information Modelling, Industry, Competence Centre, Collaboration, Integrated Project Delivery, Sustainable Construction

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Series: w78:2011 (browse)
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Alekhin V,Khanina A

The conception of making decision support system introduction into building structures design practice

Abstract: The paper discusses introduction of artificial intelligence into structural engineering practice. The necessity of this paper is accelerated by the information base (IB) and decision support systems exigency, as some standards are not completely designed and there is no statistical information on faults, defects and damage to various buildings. The article suggests creating a decision support system for the optimal structural design of buildings that takes into account a risk of a propagating rupture. The article describes possibilities of a decision support system, the stages of its development and structure. Conceptual solution of the proposed decision support system for the analysis of structures is illustrated by designing trade and business centre high-rise building. The system is based on a knowledge base, which is created during its development and can be updated and expanded with the advent of new codes of practice and new structural design recommendations. Expert system will be built on the basis of clear rules and recommendations from foreign and Russian codes of practice, as well as European standards, and international occurrences of buildings accidents. Optimization of structural elements is performed on the basis of a genetic algorithm. The effect of various genetic operators on the performance of the algorithm is investigated. A model of a genetic algorithm for optimization of steel structural elements is developed. The work is the attempt to create a complex approach to the structural design: the user can not only study the normative documentation, get advice, study the examples of calculation, but also take advantage of the proposed programs for the optimization of the design decisions. It is expected that expertís knowledge on the analysis of buildings incorporated in expert system will improve the quality of the design, and as a consequence, the reliability of structures.

Keywords: decision support systems,expert systems,optimum design,propagating rupture,genetic algorithm

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Series: convr:2013 (browse)
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Amin Kamal Akhnoukh, Asad Esmaeily

Feasibility Of Using Clear-Span Arches For Short-Span Bridges

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Full text: content.pdf (783,339 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2006 (browse)
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Amor R, Faraj I

Misconceptions About Integrated Project Databases

Abstract: The notion of an integrated project database (IPDB) has existed for decades. Over that time many projects have been undertaken to develop the technologies and frameworks required to implement an IPDB. Also over that time, there has been promotion of the benefits and impacts that IPDB systems will have on the industry. As there are still no industrially stable IPDB systems in existence, the industry's perception of what they are and what they can do has diverged from many of the original presentations. It is also clear that researchers and de-velopers involved in IPDB development have many different ideas about what constitutes an IPDB and what is, or is not, possible to create. This paper aims to describe misconceptions which are growing up around IPDB systems, and presents the authors' view of reality (informed by the opinions of the UK network of experts in ob-jects and integration (URL-1 1999) which was run by the DETR).

Keywords: integrated project database, misconception

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Full text: http://www.itcon.org/2001/5 (available to registered users only)

Series: itcon:2001 (browse)
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Andersson N

Re-engineering of the project planning processstrategic implementation of project management software

Abstract: This paper presents a model for re-engineering of the project planning process frombeing manually performed to be computer supported. The primary objective of thisstudy is to facilitate the implementation of project management software packages inorder to make use of the full potential of the software. Earlier studies show that thecurrent use of computer supported planning among project managers of buildingprojects is focused on print-out of schedules and the use of more advanced planningfunctions is limited. This study shows that only education and support is notsufficiently for project managers to adopt computer supported planning. Successfulimplementation of project management software also requires clear objectives of thecomputer supported planning and specified requirements and requisite level ofplanning details. This paper presents an approach on a strategic implementation ofcomputer supported project planning on basis of the surplus values related to the useof project management software. The results are based upon a case study at one ofSweden's largest construction companies.

Keywords: Computer support, project management, project managers, project planning,scheduling, software implementation, software support, surplus value.

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Full text: content.pdf (61,829 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:1997 (browse)
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B.H. Goh

Progression in IT adoption and stage of IT maturity in the construction sector of Singapore

Abstract: The IT maturity model, based on Nolanís Stages of Growth Model, is applied to analyse the characteristics of IT users, IT facilitators and IT providers in relation to their respective degrees of awareness, degrees of application and degrees of integration. The objective is to assess and draw useful conclusions about the progression in IT adoption by the construction sector in Singapore. At the same time, it can help to determine the stage of IT development for this sector. The data used for the analysis includes information obtained from an industry-wide questionnaire survey followed by informal discussions with industry players, as well as a review of the relevant publications. Evidence shows that there is an increasing trend of companies improving their efficiency and productivity through using IT. There is also an increasing trend of education institutions promoting IT usage through providing training. And, catering to this, there is an emergence of software development by IT vendors. Going beyond, it is clear that stakeholders need to focus their attention on achieving integration of technology, process and people as the next stage of development. It is recommended that appropriate strategies be put in place.

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Full text: content.pdf (28,476 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2009 (browse)
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Bedard C

The validation of integrated CAD in building engineering design

Abstract: The need and the urgency to develop integrated CAD software for building design are well established in industry and academia alike. The means and the approach to achieve this objective are however not soclear and do not meet with general agreement. Even the final product itself - integrated CAD - has different meanings for different people.Like other research groups in building studies, we have developed a number of integrated building design systems in the last few years thateffectively combine different activities and types of expertise in a unified approach. For these successful research initiatives, the fundamental issue of validation remains a very difficult one to answer properly. On the one hand, reference cases do not exist to benchmark the operation of an integrated system, as in the case of experimental or empirical processes. On the other hand, no clear guidelines have emergedyet from commercial software developers in the construction industry that claim to have achieved 'integrated CAD' as soon as some form of file transfer exists between an application software and a CAD package.From the study of some integrated CAD systems for building design recently developed in industry and at the CBS, this paper will attempt tocircumscribe the main aspects of the validation issue, e.g. what are the characteristics of integrated CAD ? what kind of performance is expected from such systems ? are current systems delivering what building design practitioners need ?

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Full text: content.pdf (426,635 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:1992 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.bestPractise (0.020523) class.education (0.013759) class.synthesis (0.011254)
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Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by Research Press of the National Research Council of Canada. The support of the editor, Dr. Dana Vanier, is gratefully appreciated.


Bingunath Ingirige, Ghassan Aouad

Awareness and usage of information standards in the uk construction industry: a survey by the SIENE network

Abstract: Developments in information standards and interoperability in the construction industry are becoming increasingly popular. Much of this development is centred on the Internet for sharing of information and generic data exchange. However many industry participants are unaware of the benefits of information standards and reluctant to make long-term investment on them unless there is clear evidence of business benefits. The Network on Information Standardisation, Exchanges and Management in Construction (SIENE) was launched in March 2000 to streamline information standardisation and interoperability in the construction industry. It is an international network consisting of academics and industry practitioners in the UK and elsewhere whose work on the subject is of international reputation. The project is funded by The Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) under The Innovative manufacturing Initiative (IMI). The main source of knowledge gathering is through workshops conducted in the UK. The website of SIENE also provides opportunity for the members and other participants to enhance the knowledge base of the network. SIENEís main objective is to explore current research being undertaken in the area of information standardisation and to benchmark UK performance with the rest of the world. It has also conducted workshops to investigate sources and types of barriers that prevent the adoption of information standards and to identify business benefits for construction firms. The findings of the project will be disseminated amongst industry and academia. The paper deals with the results of a questionnaire survey conducted by SIENE in the UK on awareness and usage of information standards among contractors, consultants, suppliers and clients in the construction industry. Forty members of the Construct IT, Centre of excellence in UK were selected as the initial target audience for the questionnaire survey. It is expected to broaden the scope of the survey to a wider audience in its second stage. The paper will discuss the information standards, which are widely being used in the UK construction industry and will highlight any organisational problems, which hinder the adoption of standards. It will also propose areas, which need to be improved for the firms in the industry to gain business benefits.

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Full text: content.pdf (385,336 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2001 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.strategies (0.031105) class.roadmaps (0.019768) class.commerce (0.017889)
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Permission to reproduce these documents have been graciously provided by CSIR Building and Construction Technology. The assistance of the editors, Mr. Gustav Coetzee and Mr. Frances Boshoff, is gratefully appreciated.


C Argiolas, F Melis, E Quaquero

Knowledge management in building process

Abstract: Over the last few years, the management and organizational aspects of the construction process have undergone a profound reflection that is closely linked to the development and the clear changes in the market. Such market is characterized by a rapid change, a strong growth in technology, and by a widespread and transparent information. International character, knowledge and innovation are key elements to win an increasingly exasperated competition. Moreover, the growing complexity of the construction sector - due both to the rapid proliferation of products and innovative technical solutions, and to the need to take into consideration side, but not secondary, aspects of the object (environmental impact, energy efficiency, durability, safety, etc.) - points out that present management patterns of the construction process are no longer appropriate to the context in which one operates. Therefore, the construction sector faces an inevitable process of growth in which knowledge is an indispensable resource. The present article aims at showing how Knowledge Management techniques (KM) might represent a possible tool to assist in achieving such goals through a rational organization of large amounts of data and through a corporate use of the knowledge that characterizes the various stages of a building process.

Keywords: knowledge management, building process, interoperability, collaborative design

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Series: w78:2011 (browse)
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Chen Y, Amor R

Identification and classification of A/E/C web sites and pages

Abstract: Current search engines are not well suited to serving the needs of A/E/C professionals. The general ones do not know about the vocabulary of the domain (e.g., so 'window' is a meaningless word) or rely on human classification (which severely limits the percentage of sites which are indexed). Domain specific databases and hot lists tend to be the only other option. While these have very good information they reflect a very small proportion of what is on the web. This paper looks at a system for automated classification of web sites and pages in the A/E/C domain. In particular, we concentrate on web sites and pages in New Zealand, and use the common classification system for the New Zealand construction industry (CBI). For this particular problem it is clear that no single approach to classifying web information gives a perfect answer. We therefore combine several approaches for automated classification, including: ∑ Identifying web sites that are already classified by other Internet portals and mapping these classifications to the CBI classification system. ∑ Extracting keywords from web pages and sites and then finding the relationships between the extracted keywords and topics in the CBI classification system. ∑ Using link analysis to find related web pages on a certain topic in the CBI classification system. When an A/E/C professional searches with our system we determine metrics for each approach above, and find the best combination of approaches to determine a classification and hence the resultant web sites and pages. This paper describes the components of the search engine which has been created and provides an analysis of the classification approaches.

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Full text: content.pdf (171,531 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2002 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.collaboration (0.067651) class.retrieve (0.043347) class.man-software (0.025151)
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Permission to reproduce these documents have been graciously provided by the Aarhus School of Architecture, Denmark. The assistnace of the editor, Prof. Kristian Agger, is gratefully aprecciated.


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