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Chan P

The use of web-based tools to support a contractual claim in arbitration or litigation

Abstract: Most standard forms of building contracts provide for the use of arbitration as a means of dispute resolution, failing which, the parties have to settle their disputes in court. Each dispute is resolved by examining whether the party who makes a contractual claim is able to discharge his burden of proof in both the liability issue and the quantum issue. The scope of proof is usually prescribed by the building contract. Evidence of information, facts and opinions may be adduced in support of a claim. Most project information may be stored in a web-based information management system. In existence are also some IT applications which may assist in providing facts and opinions that may support a claim. 4D Modelling may be used to simulate critical paths for the evaluation of an extension of time claim. GPS may provide the tracking of the use of resources to help attribute the cost of their use to the basis of a claim. The latest technology of LADAR may assist by recording through time, the as-built status of the project at any one time thereby determining the real-time progress of work. The use of computer-generated evidence is provided for by legislation and case law. This paves the way to use web-based tools to support a contractual claim in arbitration or litigation by linking the whole system to a claims service that monitors the situations where a claim may be made and trigger off a warning so that the procedure of claim may be pursued by a party if he chooses to do so. The claims service should then extract the necessary data from the other services in the project web to build up a claim.

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Full text: content.pdf (163,938 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2003 (browse)
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Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by the University of Auckland. The assistance of the editor who provided the full texts and the structured metadata, Dr. Robert Amor, is gratefully appreciated.


Couzens A, Thorpe T, Skitmore M

Executive information system for construction contract ridding decisions

Abstract: This paper describes the development of an integrated Executive Information System (EIS) for supporting construction executives and senior managers strategic information requirements. The system focuses on the provision of organisational and external market information for contract bidding decisions. The system uses a proprietary microcomputer based EIS development environment to access ' synthetic ' data structures representing the LAN architecture of a typical construction firm. This paper explains the theory and technologies related to the development of such systems. This is followed by a general discussion of the analysis techniques adopted for development and definition of the system. The bulk of the paper relates to a description of the proposed prototype system and its application. The system itself serves as a nucleus for access to a variety of data providing strategic information for contract bidding decisions. The development methodologies and the resulting prototype serve as a template for development of similar EIS and Visual Information Access (VIA) systems in a wider executive and senior manager information support role.

Keywords: contract bidding; tender adjudication; strategic information; executive support system; information scanning

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Full text: content.pdf (971,598 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:1993 (browse)
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Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by the National University of Singapore. The assistance of the editors, particularly Prof. Martin Betts, is gratefully appreciated.


Dreger G T

Design-build procurement: a framework for integrated management information systems

Abstract: Interest in Design-Build contract methods far facility acquisition has intensified in recent years in the US construction Industry. Owners in both public and private sectors continue to seek effective methods in their building delivery process to control cost, compress time, reduce risk, and enhance quality. Some have turned to Design-Build as a viable alternative from the traditional design-bid-build process. Recent research, including a national symposium on Design- Build sponsored by Georgia Tech, has defined sund positioned the Design-Build contract process as a viable framework for the development and application oE integrated information technology support based managemeiit models, including cost and time control systems, which offer opportunities for the support and development of systems concepts leading to integrated management of information in the successful building delivery process.

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Full text: content.pdf (1,374,056 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:1993 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.economic (0.010915) class.processing (0.003787)
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Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by the National University of Singapore. The assistance of the editors, particularly Prof. Martin Betts, is gratefully appreciated.


Dunstone, P.H. and Ashworth, G.N.

25 Years' Development of Computerised Contract Documentation - and the Future

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Full text: content.pdf (975,655 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:1986 (browse)
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E Collins

Experience in CAD 1976 - 1984

Abstract: During 1976 a building modelling system (RUCAPS), developed in the UK, was used by an architectural practice to assist in preliminary design, detailed design, and contract documentation for a major Middle East University. This system was used extensively for architectural input and it was accepted that backgrounds in plot form would be issued to the other consultants concerned, none of whom operated CAD facilities and were all based in the USA.

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Full text: content.pdf (767,269 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:1984 (browse)
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Edward Jaselskis, William Rasdorf, Min Liu, Abdullah Alsharef, Frank Bowen, Majed Al-Ghandour and Larry Goode

Factors Affecting Bid Let Dates on Transportation Mega Projects

Abstract: North Carolina Department of Transportation (NCDOT) projects with construction costs of $50 million or more, known as mega projects, make up more than 50% of their total construction expenditures while representing less than 10% of the total project count. The estimated let dates and construction expenditures for these projects can vary significantly based on the type of project, work to be accomplished, and unpredicted events. This paper presents study results of various internal and external factors that relate to bid let date delays. The research methodology involved an extensive literature review and interviews with 23 NCDOT subject matter experts and construction contractors to better understand why mega project miss their planned let dates. Results revealed several factors that affect the let date including the owner's ability to acquire the right-of-way in a timely manner, the ability to coordinate with utilities and railroads, and delays in obtaining environmental permits. The study also collected and analysed data pertaining to strategic milestones and provides insights into the likelihood of meeting a particular let date.

Keywords: Transportation Mega Project, Contract Award, Let Day Delay

DOI: https://doi.org/10.24928/JC3-2017/0081

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Engy Serag, Hesham Osman, Moustafa Ghanem

Semantic Detection of Risks and Conflicts in Construction Contracts

Abstract: Various problems facing construction contract administrators can be linked back to lack of understanding, misinterpretation and conflicts among contract clauses. Lack of adequate time to analyze contracts during the biding stage results in contractors entering into contracts without sufficient analysis of contractual risks. Advances in the fields of semantic information extraction, text mining and natural language processing create opportunities for developing semi-automated systems for detection of risks and conflicts in construction contracts. This paper presents a framework for semi-automated detection of risks and conflicts in FIDIC contracts. The system is comprised of four main components: 1) A Contract Ontology acts as the core knowledge repository of the system. The ontology contains a formalized representation of FIDIC general conditions and relevant stipulations from legal code, 2) Text mining/NLP module provides semi-automatic parsing tools for supplementary conditions of construction contracts and provide concept / relationship matching in tandem with the ontology, 3) Problematic Clause Database contains examples of high-risk and ambiguous clauses from previous projects and, 4) Logic Reasoners undertake the detection of high risk and conflicting clauses will take place. The paper presents examples of potential ambiguity and conflicts in construction contracts and showcases how the system can be used to semi-automated the detection process.

Keywords: Contract Management, Semantic Systems, Ontologies, Text Mining

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Full text: content.pdf (152,567 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2010 (browse)
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Froese T

Core process models and application areas in construction

Abstract: Integrated computer systems for the construction industry require high-level, general purpose core models of construction information to support information sharing. This paper introduces core models for building and construction, in particular an effort within the IS0 STEP organization. The paper then reviews several typical areas of computer applications for construction-planning and scheduling, estimating and cost control, and contract and document management-and discusses the implications of each application area on core models of construction processes.

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Full text: content.pdf (1,229,786 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:1995 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.store (0.033698) class.processing (0.027371) class.communication (0.012054)
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Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by the Stanford University, USA. The support of the editors, particularly Prof. Fischer is gratefully appreciated.


G. Polat & Y. Buyuksaracoglu

Using discrete-event simulation for process modeling: Case of work structuring of asphalt highway construction operations

Abstract: In this study, the resource planning problem of a real-life problem, namely a 4 km long and 14 m wide asphalt highway project, was handled. According to the contract between the owner and the contractor, all construction work should have been completed within 17 days. The contractor of this project aimed to determine the minimum number of resources required to complete the project within the estimated project duration and their utilization rates. In this research, this problem was handled using computer simulation technique. For this purpose, a dynamic, stochastic and discrete event simulation model was used. The simulation model was built using the ready-made simulation software Extend+BPR. The simulation results revealed that when 3 flagmen, 1 grader, 1 road roller, 1 water truck, 17 trucks, 1 paver, 1 rubber roller, 1 steel wheel roller, and 5 laborers are used, the construction phase of the project could be completed within 17 days. Among all the resources required to complete the project, while the rubber roller had the maximum utilization rate (68%), the water truck had the minimum value (7%). The simulation results also indicated that while any increase in the number of these resources did not help to shorten the project duration, any decrease in the number of these resources brought about severe delays. Although the proposed methodology has some limitations, it has great potential to optimize resources and production rates in similar asphalt highway construction operations, especially when used during the planning phase.

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Full text: content.pdf (551,535 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2009 (browse)
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Griffith E D, Hicks D K, McGraw K D, Case M P

Towards model based design - a case study: the modular design system

Abstract: The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers has developed a tool called the Modular Design System (MDS) to assist design professionals in the processes of planning, design, and construction document preparation for repetitive facility types. The use of early versions of MDS has demonstrated a reduction in time by nearly two-thirds typically required to design and award a construction contract. Initially developed to support Army Reserve Training Centers, the USArmy Corps plans to expand its use over a wider range of repetitive facility types. The current implementation is a hybrid document/model approach consisting of electronic drawings linked by an external database. Data consistency issues associated with this architecture limit its scalability. To meet expanded requirements, the USArmy Corps is developing a model based information approach utilizing emerging commercially available object based CAD systems. This redesigned information infrastructure marks a fundamental change from an implicit to an explicit model-based representation. Three key capabilities make MDS a powerful tool. First, the ability to capture and reuse corporate design criteria at the architectural function level. Second, it provides an integration framework for engineering analysis. Third, it manages and integrates the contract document production.The underlying MDS information infrastructure will move towards a model based approach. Future work will focus on collaborative processes such as conflict resolution and design review. Additionally, MDS offers the opportunity to transfer an information rich model downstream to operations and maintenance.

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Full text: content.pdf (98,970 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:1999 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.communication (0.023318) class.bestPractise (0.016810) class.store (0.013255)
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Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by the Research Press of the National Research Council of Canada. The support of the editors, particularly Dr. Dana Vanier, is gratefully appreciated.


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