Welcome
Digital library of construction informatics
and information technology in civil engineering and construction
 

Works 

Search Results

Facilitated by the SciX project

Hits 1 to 10 of 10

A Akcamete

An Approach to Capture Facility Maintenance and Repair Information to Store Change History

Abstract: During operations, changes happen to facilities frequently due to maintenance and repair (M&R)work, upgrades and renovations. Consequently, corresponding facility information needs to be updatedso as to provide reliable information to facility operators and managers. Moreover, the record offacility changes is necessary to understand the patterns of failures and to support proactivemaintenance decisions. Therefore, there is a need to enable storing of the information about suchchanges at the time that they occur. In current practice, facility documents are not frequently updatedand a complete history of changes is not available for supporting facility management decisions. Theauthors_ objective is to streamline the capturing of M&R information when these activities areperformed, so as to have a history of facility changes that can be used to understand how a building isdeteriorating and to support facility information updates. By observing M&R work records, weidentified the need for capturing different types of facility and change information for different typesof M&R work. Moreover, we observed the need for a spatial database to support pattern analysis byidentifying clusters that may not be found by using traditional databases. We developed a taxonomy ofM&R work that classifies various types of work on different types of facility components and listsassociated information modules that represent data required to be collected in the field. This approachenables a formal approach for capturing change information as a result of M&R work by providingcustomized templates for each type of work. The focus of this paper is to present the need forcustomization of information capture templates. The paper also gives a description of the approach offormally generating customized templates based on a taxonomy of M&R work and linking thecaptured history information with a facility information model. Enabling such a linkage will be thefirst step towards reasoning about the M&R history in order to analyze how a building deteriorates,identify problems in the building, and inform the users of facility information update needs.

Keywords: Facility maintenance, maintenance changes, change history, maintenance planning

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf (769,778 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2011 (browse)
Cluster:
Class:
Similar papers:
Sound: N/A.


Duarte J P

Introducing cam technologies in pavicentro housing production system

Abstract: Pavicentro is a Portuguese factory that mass produces prefabricated houses based on a concrete box system. Among the goals that directed the development of this system were concerns for quality and customized production. Nevertheless, while quality improved, the initial concern for customization soon faded into common mass production. The paper points out the opportunity provided by CAD/CAM technologies to develop a truly customized mass production process. Such a process would extend design diversity and enhance design quality, thus increasing customer satisfaction. The paper identifies areas of production with a greater potential for the introduction of CADICAM, which are related to the production of secondary elements, including precastconcrete and nonconcrete elements.

Keywords:

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf ( bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: ecce:1997 (browse)
Cluster:
Class:
Similar papers:
Sound: N/A.


Hamouda M J

Developing structural programs using spread sheet based software

Abstract: During last decade, computer processing has been exceedingly replacing manual calculations in performing structural analysis and design. Proprietary software gained great popularity because of their reliability and the saving they achieve and has covered a large area in designlanalysis work requirement. Yet, a number of structural tasks is still uncovered and requires customized software that should be developed to the specific requirement of users who are - in majority - structural engineers (not necessarily specialized in computer programming). For those users who need to develop customized programs to address the areas uncovered by readily available proprietary software, SPREAD SHEET BASED SOFTWARE offers a suitable base. In this paper, the term SSBS will mean a proprietary software based on spread sheet format which can be used as a media to develop customized programs to serve specific engineering requirements. As examples to that are the LOTUS 1-2-3 and the MS EXCEL.

Keywords:

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf ( bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: ecce:1997 (browse)
Cluster:
Class:
Similar papers:
Sound: N/A.


Huhnt W, Kluge M, Laufer H

Mapping technical processes into standard software for business support

Abstract: "Integrated software systems have been implemented in the last years to support business activities in companies including enterprise resource planing. These systems are characterized by the possibility to be customized with respect to the specific processes which already take place in companies. The use of these systems is not restricted to a specific industrial sector. It is of common use to support business activities of construction companies by these systems. Construction companies are characterized by extensive and complex processes which take place in technical divisions. These technical processes are executed for specific projects. To support the technical processes by an information system, two major problems have to be solved. The first problem is concerned with the interaction of the processes which take place in the projects and the processes which are independent of project work. The second problem is concerned with the interaction of technical processes and processes for the business activity. Existing software systems support project work. Therefore, these systems have to be expanded with respect to the technical processes. The paper presents a concept to expand existing software systems in such a way that technical processes are supported as a part of the project work in the context of a company. The technical processes are specified on the base of the set theory. The processes which are supported by the existing system are specified in the same manner. Both specifications are unified. On the basis of this unification, the interaction of the different processes is illustrated. In addition, the specifications are used for the implementation. The specifications of information are used to generate a schema for a data base and to expand the existing schema. The specifications of the tasks are used to identify algorithms which have to be implemented. Results are presented. Technical processes are shown which take place as a part of facility management. The interaction between these technical processes and existing processes is illustrated. On the basis of the existing system Navision financials, the support of technical processes is shown."

Keywords:

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf (289,195 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2000 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.man-software (0.025819) class.commerce (0.023190) class.strategies (0.014065)
Similar papers:
Sound: read aloud.

Permission to reproduce these documents have been graciously provided by Icelandic Building Research Institute. The assistance of the editor, Mr. Gudni Gudnason, is gratefully appreciated


Ling Ma, Rafael Sacks and Uri Kattel

Building Model Object Classification for Semantic Enrichment Using Geometric Features and Pairwise Spatial Relationships

Abstract: Semantic enrichment is a process of supplementing/correcting information in a poorly prepared BIM model. Object classifications are essential information, but are commonly missing or incorrectly represented when transferring a BIM model or creating a model using tools customized for other domains in design. Automated compilation of 'as-is' BIM models from point cloud data also requires object classification, as well as 3D reconstruction. We present a systematic approach to classifying objects in a BIM model, for use in future semantic enrichment systems. Previous work on object classification in BIM model enrichment was restricted by its limited ability to accurately interpret geometric and spatial features and by the constraints of Boolean logic rules and the rule compilation process. To address these issues, we propose a procedure for establishing a knowledge base that associates objects with their features and relationships, and a matching algorithm based on a similarity measurement between the knowledge base and facts. An implementation on a synthetic bridge model shows that whereas some objects can be classified by shape features alone, most objects require the use of spatial relations for unique classification. Spatial context is more likely uniquely identify an object than shape features are.

Keywords: Building Information Modelling, Semantic Enrichment, Geometric Feature, Spatial Relation, Object Classification

DOI: https://doi.org/10.24928/JC3-2017/0044

Full text: content.pdf (1,044,975 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: jc3:2017 (browse)
Cluster:
Class:
Similar papers:
Sound: N/A.


Markus Schorr, Andre Borrmann, Cornelia Klaubert, Yang Ji, Willibald Gunthner, Ernst Rank

A Product Lifecycle Management Approach for Civil Engineering Projects

Abstract: Product Lifecycle Management (PLM) is a strategic concept to develop, manage and keep control of industrial products over their entire lifecycle. The concept comprises IT-systems as well as methods, business processes and organizational structures (Arnold, 2005). The most essential component for a PLM implementation is product data management (PDM) systems that administrate all the data from initial ideas, drafts and drawings to information on the manufacture and maintenance on a central storage platform (Stark, 2005). Compared to document management systems, PDM systems provide part-oriented functions required for linking components, corresponding 3D models and drawings as well as any other related documents in a clearly arranged pattern. In addition, they also provide a convenient means of transferring and incorporating data from CAD-systems into the central storage platform. Combined with cleverly devised access rights management and an integrated workflow engine, PDM systems appear to be a good information management solution in civil engineering projects.Since those systems are designed to serve in-house information management procedures in the mechanical engineering industry, however, they have not been used for civil engineering projects so far (Borrmann, 2009). This is due to the fact that special requirements needed in construction projects have not been fulfilled yet. This paper describes both the concept and the implementation of a PDM system customized to manage data arising in civil engineering projects. As well as discussing specific requirements, it also introduces the implementation of necessary adjustments and several add-ons are presented. Thus the paper shows how an adapted PDM system originally developed for the mechanical engineering industry enables a company-wide component-oriented management of all relevant data over the entire lifecycle of a building. Beyond that, today’s inadequacies and missing features for using PDM systems in civil engineering projects are described.

Keywords: Building Lifecycle Management, Product Data Management, Document Management, Data Acquisition and Storage, Information and Knowledge Management

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf (332,442 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2010 (browse)
Cluster:
Class:
Similar papers:
Sound: N/A.


Muramoto, Katsuhiko; Jemtrud, Michael; Kumar, Sonali; Balakrishnan, Bimal; and Wiley, Danielle

Emerging Techologies in a Tele-Collaborative Design Studio between Pennsylvania State University And Carleton University

Abstract: The research project investigates the use of a network-enabled platform (NEP) involving a combination of technologies that include: high bandwidth network infrastructure; high-performance visualization and computer cluster solutions; standard and high definition tele-presence/communication infrastructure; co-located immersive environments; and a range of modeling and imaging applications. The NEP enabled student teams in multiple locations to collaborate via on-demand, synchronous access to project data, visualization, modeling, simulation and multimodal interpersonal communication tools through a web service based dashboard interface that hid the logistic and technical complexities to the user. As a preliminary report on a proof-of-concept design studio conducted during the spring semester of 2007 between the Carleton Immersive Media Studio (CIMS) at Carleton University in Ottawa and the Immersive Environment Laboratory (IEL) at Pennsylvania State University, the paper first describes the implementation of this networkcentric collaborative design platform. The report articulates the “staging” of the conditions of possibility for a dynamic interplay between technological mediation and the reality of making, then compares the use of high bandwidth technology with customized symmetrical toolsets in the tele-collaborative educational environment, versus commercial toolsets deployed over moderate bandwidth connections. In each setting, the collaborative environment is assessed according to issues encountered by students and design outcomes. The effectiveness of the digitally mediated collaborative studio is also gauged in terms of student reaction to the learning process via feedback surveys and questionnaires.

Keywords: design, collaboration, tele-presence, visualization, broadband

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf (197,864 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: convr:2007 (browse)
Cluster:
Class:
Similar papers:
Sound: N/A.


Patrik Jensen, Thomas Olofsson, Marcus Sandberg, Linus Malmgren

REDUCING COMPLEXITY OF CUSTOMIZED PREFABRICATED BUILDINGS THROUGH MODULARIZATION AND IT SUPPORT

Abstract: Many companies in Sweden using prefabricating strategies are currently meeting the ever increasing customer requirements with ad-hoc solutions that do not fit their production system. This is causing bottlenecks and lower profit margins as a consequence. One solution to the problem is to re-engineer their building systems according to modularization principles used in the manufacturing industries, which have adapted their production to be able to meet mass-customization.This paper describes the first part in study of modularization of building systems and if methods used in the manufacturing industry can be adapted to the building industry. The Swedish construction industries using prefabrication strategies are mainly project oriented, and needs to develop a more product oriented development process to benefit from the values that modularization can give. It is also obvious that it is impossible to introduce modularization methods used in manufacturing industries if design requirements are incomplete or changing from project to project. It is therefore essential that the product owner owns the whole process as well. Varying customers’ demands can to some extent be handled using modularization principles. However, we don’t believe that one solution fit’s all; therefore it is essential to target a specific segment of the market. The cost for the development of such modularized building system for the targeted segment of customer must be evaluated against the possible market share.

Keywords: Modularization, standardization, prefabricating, Quality Function Deployment (QFD), Modular Function Deployment (MFD)

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf (358,284 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2008 (browse)
Cluster:
Class:
Similar papers:
Sound: N/A.


V Benjaoran & N Dawood

An application of Artificial Intelligence Planner for bespoke precast concrete production planning: a case study

Abstract: Precast concrete manufacturers are highly involved in the construction industry through the supply of bespoke products. Their workload is a complex combination of different and unique designed products, which have various delivery dates. The production process from design to manufacturing is complicated and contains uncertainties due to many factors such as: multi-disciplinary design, progress on construction sites, and costly purpose-built moulds. An integrated, comprehensive planning system called Artificial Intelligence Planner (AIP) has been proposed to improve the efficiency of the process by targeting on the production planning as a significant impact to the success of the business. Artificial intelligent techniques are used in AIP to enhance data analyses and decision supports for production planning. A case study for the implementation was conducted on a real bespoke precast concrete manufacturer. The difference between AIP and this factory setting was attended. Data from the studied were reformatted and the AIP configuration was customized. Finally, the successful implementation has showed the adaptability and flexibility of AIP to the real production conditions, and it has given the improvement of the resulted production schedules. The anticipated outcomes are the shortened customer lead-time and the optimum factory's resource utilization.

Keywords:

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf (295,792 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2005 (browse)
Cluster:
Class:
Similar papers:
Sound: N/A.

Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by the Technische Universität Dresden.


Wu W,Issa R

Integrated process mapping for bim implemenation in green building project delivery

Abstract: Professionals in the architecture, engineering and construction (AEC) industry are becoming more versed with building information modeling (BIM), and start to recognize its synergy with green building. As more owners are demanding better building performance to meet regulatory requirements, business goals or to establish a positive public image, implementing BIM in green building project delivery offers project teams the ideal leverage to meet owners’ expectations. Current Green BIM practices are immature, ad-hoc and unsystematic. The lack of an integrated process is the biggest barrier to exploring the benefits of Green BIM to their full extent. The fact that most project teams are transient in nature also makes it challenging to replicate success from one project to another. Other major obstacles reside in understanding the subtleties in differentiating the roles and responsibilities of team members, determining appropriate BIM execution strategies and standardizing information exchange (IE). Hence, the purpose of this research is to conduct a comprehensive review of existing Green BIM strategies and best practices, and to develop an Integrated Green BIM Process Map (IGBPM) to provide guidance on BIM implementation in green building project delivery. The deliverables of this research include a customized worksheet for project sustainability goals and BIM use identification, Level 1 of the IGBPM and several examples of the Level 2 process maps using LEED as a use case. The IGBPM is valuable to industry practitioners since it represents a holistic and systematic approach to efficiently utilize limited BIM resources to overcome the challenges and complexities to successfully delivering the project and achieving the targeted green certification. The structural transparency of the IGBPM also encourages risk/benefit sharing that can help enhance collaboration among team members and eventually facilitate a more integrated delivery of green building projects.

Keywords: Building information modeling,green building,process mapping,project delivery

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf ( bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: convr:2013 (browse)
Cluster:
Class:
Similar papers:
Sound: N/A.


No more hits.

 

hosted by University of Ljubljana



includes

W78




© itc.scix.net 2003
Home page of this database login Powered by SciX Open Publishing Services 1.002 February 16, 2003