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Atkin B L

Measuring information integration in project teams

Abstract: Integrated project information is the goal for many clients and their project teams. In theory, the aim is to use IT to support a seamless electronic process in which data are entered once and where no manual intervention interrupts the flows across the different life stages. In practice, IT has been used largely to reinforce existing work patterns that fragment the team's efforts. So far, IT has delivered limited benefits. A study of integrated project information has been completed on 11 building projects across four European countries. Degrees of integration of project information have been measured and used to derive some measure of the extent to which project teams are bound together by the use of IT. This paper summarises the 11 case studies, by revealing the extent to which IT has been successfully applied to support integration. The findings provide pointers to the future application of IT by project teams. In this regard, the active interest of the client in the project and its IT infrastructure is emphasised.

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Full text: content.pdf (415,468 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:1999 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.man-man (0.021680) class.processing (0.012466) class.roadmaps (0.009827)
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Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by the Research Press of the National Research Council of Canada. The support of the editors, particularly Dr. Dana Vanier, is gratefully appreciated.


Carozza L,Bosché F,Abdel-Wahab M

Image-based localization for an indoor VR/AR construction training system

Abstract: Virtual /Augmented Reality (VR/AR) technologies have been increasingly used in recent years to support different areas of the construction industry. Their simulation capabilities can enable different construction stakeholders to evaluate the impact of their choices not only on the built environment, but also with regard to the correct execution of operational procedures. Training providers, such as Further Education (FE) colleges, can also enhance their trainee’s experience through the simulation of realistic construction contexts whilst eliminating health and safety risks. Current approaches for the simulation of learning environments in Construction, such as Virtual Learning Environment (VLEs), provide limited degree of interactivity during the execution of real working tasks. Whilst immersive approaches (e.g. CAVE-based) can provide enhanced visualization of simulated environments, they require complex and expensive set-up with limited practical interaction in real construction projects context. This paper outlines a localization approach employed in the development of an Immersive Environment (IE) for Construction training, cheaper than CAVE-based approaches and which has the potential to be rolled-out to the FE sector for maximizing the benefit to the construction industry. Pose estimation of the trainee is achieved by processing images acquired by a monocular camera integral with his head while performing tasks in a virtual construction environment. Realistic perception of the working environment and its potentially hazardous conditions can thus be consistently delivered to the trainee through immersive display devices (e.g. goggles). Preliminary performance of the localization approach is reported in the context of working at heights (which has a wide applicability to a range of construction trades, such as scaffolders and roofers), whilst highlighting the potential benefits for trainees. Current limitations of the localization approach are also discussed suggesting directions for future development.

Keywords: Image-based,localization,VR/AR,construction training

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Series: convr:2013 (browse)
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Grijspeerdt K, Backx E, Rammant J P

Lclms, an advanced database environment for the development of multimedia courses

Abstract: The Live Code Learning Multimedia System (LCLMS) is an integrated development environment, available on Windows NT and Unix-platforms, that allows the creation of advanced multimedia computer based training courses, deliverable through a (remote) network. The foundation of the system consists of a robust relational database management system (RDBMS). A specially developed database management system allows rapidly and intuitively querying, retrieving and storing of multimedia data. The course can be developed with a modified version of IconAuthonB, a high-end multimedia authoring tool that uses a graphical flow chart metaphor. The course is delivered to the end-user via a web browser, or by using a dedicated viewer. The course can be delivered to the end-user via a network, either locally or world-wide.

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Series: ecce:1997 (browse)
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Ito Y,Soulier C,Pencreach Y,Hafferty B,Hafferty P

The application of cloud computing in transport planning using interactive 3D VR simulation technology

Abstract: The design and planning of urban and transport infrastructure has undergone a tremendous transformation over the past few years. Not only has the available software technology changed considerably, so have the requirements and demands of the various stakeholders. As the democratic process becomes even more open, coupled with the advent of 24/7 information and news, so the demands of the general public to have a greater say in the actions that have a direct effect on their lives have increased. Local and National Government planning professionals are under increasing pressure to not only justify what they plan to do in words and pictures, but also to show the proposed new developments in a medium that is far more easily understandable to the ordinary ‘man in the street’. In the recent past the only way to do this was by calling ‘town hall meetings’ and displaying large photographs, video clips or solid models. This paper describes a new and novel way to improve consensus building for contentious new infrastructure projects, by using Interactive 3D Visual Simulation computer models, delivered to the target stakeholder community via the Cloud.

Keywords: 3D,Visualization,VR,Cloud Computing,Urban Planning,3D City Modeling

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Full text: content.pdf (689,297 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: convr:2013 (browse)
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Kathryn Davies

IT Barometer New Zealand – A Survey of Computer Use and Attitudes in the New Zealand Construction Industry

Abstract: Building productivity in New Zealand lags other countries and industries which invest more heavily in technology. Improved productivity of the construction sector is widely touted as a significant factor in boosting the performance of the country as a whole. Application of IT has for some time been hailed as the key to implementing such productivity gains. International initiatives such as BuildSmart and Integrated Design & Delivery Solutions (IDDS) are very strongly oriented around improving construction through IT. To use their findings, and to allow informed decision making in IT investment, development and education, the New Zealand construction industry needs more information on the current state of IT use.This paper reports on a national survey undertaken in 2009/2010, based on the IT Barometer questionnaire. Elements of a 1997 New Zealand survey of construction IT use, were also incorporated to allow longitudinal analysis.The target population was the construction and facility management sector, in this case including the whole of New Zealand. A wide range of professions fall into this population, including architects (architectural designers and draughtspersons); technical consultants (engineers, quantity surveyors, project managers); contractors and sub-contractors; property owners and managers; and the materials industry (manufacturers and suppliers). The questionnaire was delivered to 388 companies, and 81 completed responses were received, a response rate of 21%.Results show that while most companies use computers, for many it is primarily a business tool for administrative functions, rather than a tool in the construction process. Use of specialist construction-focused programs has increased, however, and interest in project webs is also growing. A fundamental barrier to increased use of IT is the cost of investment, with several respondents commenting that this is due to the staff time and disruption involved and not simply the financial cost of the hardware and software required.

Keywords: survey, IT barometer, computer use, New Zealand

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Full text: content.pdf (239,646 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2010 (browse)
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Masaru Minagawa, Masahiro Kurihara, and Iku Sato

Study On Re-Use Support System For Electronically Delivered Data

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Full text: content.pdf (549,588 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2006 (browse)
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Park M, Pena-Mora F

Development of Dynamic Planning and Control Methodology (DPM): based on the user-defi ned dynamic modeling approach

Abstract: CPM-based scheduling methods have been most widely used in the planning and control of construction projects. However, their usefulness has been often questioned, particularly when a project is heavily constrained by either time or resources. This is mainly because those CPM-based methods lack the mechanism to effectively formulate construction plans and evaluate feedback effects on the construction performance. As an effort to address this issue, the Dynamic Planning and Control Methodology (DPM) has been developed by integrating the CPM-based network scheduling concept and the simulation approach. To be used as a standalone planning and control tool, DPM adopts the user-defi ed dynamic modeling approach, which allows construction planners to defi ne contents of pre-structured models by setting the values of model parameters. Having the ability to simulate the dynamic state of construction with the required fl exibility, DPM aims to help prepare a robust construction plan against uncertainties. Particularly, DPM focuses on construction feedbacks in dealing with indirect and unanticipated events that might occur during construction. As examined in a case study with bridge construction projects, the use of DPM would help ensure that construction projects could be delivered in time without driving up costs by enhancing planning and control capabilities.

Keywords: user-defined dynamic modeling, simulation, project management, dynamic modeling, system dynamics

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Series: itaec:2003 (browse)
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Plokker W, Augenbroe G

PDI tools in the combine project

Abstract: Results from the COMBINE project (Computer Models for the Building Industry in Europe) are presented. This EU-funded project, now in it‘s second phase, deals with the development of integrated building design systems. COMBINE has concentrated on providing efficient data exchange between a number of “design nodes” in a network, each node being identified as an actor at a workstation in a LAN connected design team. The paper deals with the way data exchange facilities are delivered to the project in the form of a customizable interface kit.

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Full text: content.pdf (1,218,906 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:1994 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.software-software (0.026272) class.man-software (0.019113) class.impact (0.018557)
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Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by VTT, Espoo, Finland.


Tiwari S, Howard H C, Levit R E

A design notification scheme for distributed AEC framework

Abstract: The Architecture, Engineering and Construction design process (AEC) involves participation of many inter-dependent specialists, who nevertheless make autonomous design decisions in their specialized domains. This fragmented and multidisciplinary design process often suffers from inadequate communication among specialists and a lack of coordination of design information. In this paper, we present a design-change notification scheme for a distributed engineering environment. The notification scheme facilitates conflict resolution by providing the relevant information about the design objects involved in a conflict. It operates on a global design repository, which uniformly captures the design data and cross-functional design dependencies. Upon detection of a design conflict, notification messages are automatically generated and delivered to concerned project participants in a particular sequence that is based on the nature of the conflict and the roles of the parties involved. We assert that this type of notification system in a design environment will facilitate identification of design conflicts early in the design process, and should decrease the number of change orders and rework during the construction phase. Fewer change orders and reduced project meetings can result in enhanced trust, improved cooperation, and lower project costs.

Keywords: design conflict; architecture, engineering and construction; engineering databases; constraint management; distributed systems

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Full text: content.pdf (563,662 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:1993 (browse)
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Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by the National University of Singapore. The assistance of the editors, particularly Prof. Martin Betts, is gratefully appreciated.


Tracey Crosbie, John Broderick, Muneeb Dawood, Richard Charlesworth, Vladimir Vukovic, Michael Short and Nashwan Dawood

Integrating Technologies for Demand Response in Blocks of Buildings - A UK Case Study

Abstract: Flexibility in contemporary energy systems is predominantly delivered by fossil fuels. Low carbon energy services are required to avoid dangerous climate change, however, in the electricity sector, energy flows must be balanced instantaneously, and many renewable resources are either variable, uncertain or both. Demand Response (DR) enables consumers to play a significant role in the delivery of flexibility on the electric grid by reducing or shifting their electricity usage during periods of stress or constraint. The value of DR to blocks of buildings depends on the telemetry and control technologies in existing building management systems and the potential revenue sources. To encourage the growth of DR servicesÕ and reap the potential benefits, it is necessary to characterise the economic and environmental benefits of DR. The EU Horizon 2020 co-funded project ÒDemand Response in Blocks of BuildingsÓ (DR-BOB: www.dr-bob.eu) aims to do just that. This paper describes the technical approach taken by the DR-BOB project at its Teesside University site, focussing on the challenges encountered and the solutions proposed for this city centre campus. It updates previous work (Crosbie et al, 2016) that has described the broader principles and technologies being evaluated at four sites across Europe.

Keywords: Demand Response (DR), Flexibility, Smart Grid, Electricity Networks, Blocks of Buildings

DOI: https://doi.org/10.24928/JC3-2017/0225

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