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D. Grau

Characterizing the Non-Value-Added Relocation of Non-Bulk Components on Storage Yards

Abstract: In order to improve the effectiveness of an uncertain process _the outcomes of which cannot be predicted, key players need to unfold the variables that hide behind it and measure their impact on the process. Currently, the process of relocating non-bulk materials on storage yards mostly falls under this uncertainty domain. While the fact that pre-fabricated items need to be repositioned for purposes other than those strictly productive is widely assumed by industry organizations, there is a lack of detailed research to understand these non-value-added relocations. This research relies on a case study to analyze and to quantify the non-value-added relocation of steel components. The analysis of their daily position coordinates coupled with the characteristics of these steel components is used to characterize their relocations on a typical yard. Preliminary results indicate that the percentage of components unnecessarily repositioned is much larger than actually perceived by industry organizations.

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Full text: content.pdf (332,645 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2009 (browse)
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Dana J Vanier

Opportunities for Integrated ICT in the Management of Sustainable Municipal Infrastructure

Abstract: This position paper will attempt to provide the audience with a high-level picture of opportunities for integrated Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) for the management of sustainable municipal infrastructure. It will provide both an overall view of the opportunities that exist, followed by a proposal for a practical and feasible implementation (one that can be implemented by a limited number of researchers). In fact, there are many opportunities available in this domain today and a wide selection of feasible implementations. This position paper and the proposed work stems from the need to develop decision support tools for municipal asset managers within the context of the Municipal Infrastructure Investment Planning Project (MIIP - www.nrc.ca/irc/uir/miip). MIIP is joint research project currently sponsored by the National Research Council of Canada and a number of Canadian municipalities.

Keywords: Infrastructure Product Models, GIS, Asset Management

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Series: w78:2004 (browse)
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De Vries B

The computer integrated future the minimal approach

Abstract: A distinction is made between dataexchange within a system and between systems. For the latter a datamodel is defined with a clear limited domain called the minimal model. Moreover a procedure is shown for exchanging data using the minimal model.

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Full text: content.pdf (525,255 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:1991 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.roadmaps (0.017332) class.software-software (0.008159) class.retrieve (0.001209)
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Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by Eindhoven University of Technology.


Debras P, Monceyron J L, Bauer F, Ballesta P, Rocca F X

From product data technology to applications: an illustrative case in the AEC domain

Abstract: Handling the fragmentation of the Building industry stands for one of the major challenge of this predominant economic sector in Europe and interoperability between a various range of dedicated applications is the main end-user requirement at a practical level. In that context Product Data Technologies are regarded as a the most promising route to meet the objective. However, the elaboration and further deployment of PDT based applications requires the availability of both suitable Product Data models that conveys the underlying semantics of these applications and software platforms allowing an easy usage of such data models at the implementation level. CSTB STEP Platform is first presented that offers an implementation of STEP Standard Data Access Interface. Focus is set on the generic aspect of the platform regarding its ability to support any EXPRESS schema, but also on its architecture that encompasses among others persistence, OLE support and WEB compliance. Attention is then brought to the semantic level and the Industry Foundation Classes are depicted as a promising product data model regarding the needs of the Architecture, Engineering and Construction domain. Building upon these two components, a illustrative application is detailed that evidences the interest of PTD in the Building sector. Elaborated under the auspices of the French chapter of the International Alliance for Interoperability, this application acts as a Building Project Server and allows the co-operation of various AEC software toolkits handling respectively the Architecture design, the HVAC design and the edition of technical documents.

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Full text: content.pdf (56,799 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:1998 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.represent (0.030255) class.software development (0.018361) class.man-software (0.015492)
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Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden. The assistance of the editors, Prof. Bo-Christer Björk and Dr. Adina Jägbeck, is gratefully appreciated.


Debras P, Monceyron J L, Buckley E, Leonard D, Carpentier G, , Seifert L

The construction pilot in GENIAL: implementing the GEN vision in the construction domain

Abstract: Among the emerging range of new working habits that appear to best preserve companies position in competitive markets, the Global Engineering Network (GEN) Initiative has recognised the reuse of internal and external engineering knowledge as one of the very promising approach to be considered by companies elaborating their business strategies. With that respect, the GENIAL project devotes its mission to the promotion of a new king of market places where actors capture and retrieve on-line a wide range of engineering products and services. The GENIAL architecture is first depicted that emphasises its main components. The GENIAL approach is then described that allows a information provider to play as a Value Added Service Provider in the GENIAL sense. This approach is then illustrated by dedicated cases in the construction domain that evidenced the benefits of the concepts from a user point of view.

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Full text: content.pdf (327,190 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:1998 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.roadmaps (0.022317) class.strategies (0.018025) class.commerce (0.013436)
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Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden. The assistance of the editors, Prof. Bo-Christer Björk and Dr. Adina Jägbeck, is gratefully appreciated.


Debras P

Construction application of a gen-network : uniform access to standards, products and company information

Abstract: "Facing an increasing competitive environment where flexibility and adaptability to change are the obliged route to success, building and construction companies have to continuously renew their working habits while keeping business processes under quality, time and cost control. In the Architecture, Engineering and Construction (AEC) domain, the wide diversity in terms of the object built, but also associated to the geographical dispersion of actors and building sites makes such an agility even more crucial. Considering the design and tendering phase of a construction operation, the architects and construction engineers have to efficiently select the manufactured products that will best suit the project while complying to its numerous constraints. Beyond the functionality, performance and cost characteristics, a suitable product has also to conform to the applying regulations and standards, be eventually accompanied with a corresponding technical agreement, offer acceptable delivery solutions on the building site. Moreover, once identified within a manufacturer catalogue, the product has to be integrated into the architect or engineer application desktop, whether it be a CAD, specification writer or quantity take-off application. Addressing these needs, the Global Engineering Networking (GEN) initiative is promoting the reuse of company internal and external engineering knowledge through the emergence of new kind of global market places where actors publish and retrieve on-line a wide range of engineering information and services. In particular, The Construction Pilot in EP 22 284 GENIAL project demonstrates over the AEC domain, the relevance of new generation of Information Technology infrastructures supporting the erection of Value-Added Service Provider (VASP) sites that materialise the GEN vision, i.e. allowing information and services to smoothly be retrieved where required whilst the succeeding company is concentrating on its core competencies. With such an infrastructure, whether it is through material, performances, manufacturer, regulation or price discrimination, the appropriate component, document or service is rapidly and cost effectively brought on the designer desk for the best value of the overall project. On the other side of the communication pipe, the supplying partner gains the opportunity of reaching an enlarged audience as IT now commonly break any geographical distance. In practice, three major information publishers and a building contractor in Europe initiate the GEN network in the AEC domain through the erection of VASP sites offering product, company or document related information. User queries are governed by various standard (EPIC, UNICLASS) or corpus specific (BATIBASE, EDIBATEC) classification systems. Relevance of the overall approach is demonstrated through the presentation of a large variety of such queries for the various information corpuses used : Techcom company and product information, BIC company, product and document, REEF regulation documentary corpus or EDIBATEC product information."

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Full text: content.pdf (748,881 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2000 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.legal (0.032376) class.retrieve (0.019963) class.roadmaps (0.012591)
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Permission to reproduce these documents have been graciously provided by Icelandic Building Research Institute. The assistance of the editor, Mr. Gudni Gudnason, is gratefully appreciated


Dikba_ A., Erco_kun K.

Implementability Of Crm In AEC/FM Domain - The San-Tez Research

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Full text: content.pdf (743,169 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2006 (browse)
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Durmisevic S, Ciftcioglu O, Sariyildiz S

Knowledge modelling of 'soft' data in architectural design

Abstract: IT Context: Information technologies are at present used in various disciplines to address issues such as information processing, data mining, knowledge-modelling etc. Its final goal is to provide necessary aid to professionals during decision-making process. This raises already few questions such as, what type of data is considered and are there some new emerging technologies that can improve knowledge modelling and therefore provide better decision support to the professionals. Design professionals are very often confronted with soft data that they somehow need to interpret and finally integrate in a design. Situations dealing with the numerical data may occur quite naturally in exact sciences like engineering sciences, life sciences etc. However, the quantities subject to consideration in soft sciences are often qualitative rather than quantitative so that we relate to that type of data as 'soft' data. As an example, in such cases, the quantities may be linguistic so that such quantities have to be somehow expressed in numerical form for treatment by conclusive numerical analysis methods. Objectives: The architectural design task is one example having linguistic qualities as priory design information. This is especially the case when qualities of certain space are discussed, like for example in post occupancy evaluation of the buildings, where the relationship between spatial characteristics and psychological aspects plays an important role. Expressions such as: bright colour, light room, large space are some of these examples and therefore a special method is needed for representation and processing of such vague expressions and concepts. Better understanding of these concepts is necessary so that the knowledge can be modelled in a proper way. Methodology: The analyses are performed by means of soft computing methods. The data subject to analysis and later to knowledge modelling belongs to an underground station that is already being used. For this purpose, the data on psychological aspects are obtained via comprehensive inquiry of the users of underground station. For the analysis, the linguistic information is firstly converted to terms in fuzzy logic domain and after appropriate treatment, the data analyses are carried out and the results are expressed in most comprehensible form for design assessments. Such conversions are referred to as fuzzification and defuzzification, where the data are expressed in numerical form and therefore become convenient for mathematical treatment. Conclusions: Referring to the complexity of task in dealing with the soft data as well as dealing with soft computing, the paper first identifies the source of these complexities referring to the architectural design tasks. Following this, a soft computing analysis method based on one case study will be presented, whereby the focus will be on knowledge modelling. Finally, the results of the analyses together with the conclusions regarding the observed effectiveness of the approach are presented.

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Full text: content.pdf (242,586 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2001 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.retrieve (0.036108) class.impact (0.013187) class.analysis (0.007731)
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Permission to reproduce these documents have been graciously provided by CSIR Building and Construction Technology. The assistance of the editors, Mr. Gustav Coetzee and Mr. Frances Boshoff, is gratefully appreciated.


Earl M

A design automation paradox

Abstract: There seems to be a 'tyranny' of predefined purpose in some highly automated CAD products. For example, a CAD product for architects may provide 'high level" commands for trimming 'walls'. However, unless the 'wall' types conform to a particular topology, they can not be trimmed. On the other hand , there are 'low level' commands which can be used to trim more general types of graphic entities. However, unless the graphic entities are tediously decomposed into primitive elements, such as line segments and arcs, they also can not be trimmed. A paradox of design automation is that adding higher level functionality to a CAD product bounds its use within a specific design modeling domain and restricts its use from other more general domains. On the other hand, more general CAD products are flexible at a primitive level, but can not be used to provide 'high level' functionality. Although design specific knowledge within a CAD product may prove to be a great utility in some instances, it is typically paid for in terms of pre-conceived constraints on modeling. Artificial Intelligence techniques may provide a way of offering high level functionality with less pre-conceived constraints; however, it may be fallacious to assume that o particular modeling domain will not be Imposed on the user. This paper illustrates how a modeling domain is typically defined with a commercial CAD product . It takes notice of how the assumptions underlying any particular modeling domain may be challenged by design theory. It then cautiously explores a scenario for how the need for a modeling domain may be reconciled in a "thousand flowers bloom" approach.

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Full text: content.pdf (3,047,902 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:1988 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.synthesis (0.021123) class.analysis (0.008794) class.man-software (0.003701)
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Permission to reproduce these documents has been graciously provided by the Lund University and the Swedish Building Centre. The assistance of the editors, Prof. Per Christiansson and Prof. Henry Karlsson, is gratefully appreciated.


Ekholm A

Co-ordination of classifications for product modelling and established building classifications

Abstract: Computer based information management introduces new possibilities and puts partly new requirements on information and classification systems. The rapid develop-ment and dissemination of information technology within the construction sector demands international co-ordination of standards and classification systems. This paper presents the preliminary results of a study of the product model classification systems IFC and POSC/Caesar in relation to the established building classification systems as defined in ISO 12006-2 and the Swedish BSAB 96. The study is part of a project with the aim to analyse the structure, scope and direction of development for these different systems, and to investigate the possibilities of co-ordination and co-operation between them. It shows a need for co-ordination of concepts in the ontological and the domain levels.

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Full text: content.pdf (72,192 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:1999 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.standards (0.026432) class.retrieve (0.020655) class.represent (0.020085)
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Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by the Research Press of the National Research Council of Canada. The support of the editors, particularly Dr. Dana Vanier, is gratefully appreciated.


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