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Ahmad I, Nunoo C

Data warehousing in the construction industry: organizing and processing data for decision-making

Abstract: Construction organizations are critically dependent on data. But data must be available in suitable forms for use. Timely access to useful and meaningful information can enable construction companies gain competitive edge, increase client satisfaction, expand market share and enhance profitability. Vast amounts of construction operational data are scattered across multiple, dispersed and fragmented departments, units or project sites. In this paper, we present data warehousing as an emerging database management technology that can provide the resource for decisionmaking. We point out the difference between an operational database - used for transaction processing; and a data warehouse - intended to be used for analytic processing in management decision-making in the context of construction organizations.

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Full text: content.pdf (87,784 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:1999 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.store (0.010961) class.retrieve (0.002378)
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Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by the Research Press of the National Research Council of Canada. The support of the editors, particularly Dr. Dana Vanier, is gratefully appreciated.


Bloomfield D, Amor R

I-SEEC: an internet gateway to european construction resources

Abstract: For the construction industries to move into the knowledge society and knowledge economy they need to be able to build upon their existing information base. This information base is unique within individual countries (though often with significant overlap between countries, for example, with Eurocodes utilised across Europe) and usually widely dispersed. Drawing together the information resources within nations, and then connecting them with each other to form trans-national resources enables a more effective, informed and intelligent industry. I-SEEC is a collaborative project funded by the European Union with the overall goal of creating an infrastructure to enable and link high quality commercial electronic information services throughout its member countries. This project started in March 2000 and finishes in April 2001. It builds upon a previous EU project - CONNET (CONstruction information service NETwork). This paper provides a description of the final state of the infrastructure, services and business models available through I-SEEC. The countries participating in I-SEEC are Finland, Iceland, Italy, the Netherlands, Slovenia, Spain and the United Kingdom. CONNET provides access to a range of high quality Internet-based services for the construction industry in Europe. It provides both a European entry point to identify resources and national entry points for localised service delivery. The European CONNET entry point provides a range of technology park services as well as industry-specific services. These services include: · Management of security services, including installation and monitoring of security systems · Help desk, providing a point of contact for potential service providers and for problem resolution · Information broker role, enabling transparent access to information in the CONNET services · Technology observatory service, including leading edge, current and best-practice technologies · Provision of user profiles, allowing personalised delivery of updates in areas of interest · Multi-classification support, permitting handling of national systems used across the EC. · Inter-service communication services, allowing all comparable services to be identified and a query to be passed from one service to another service to answer. · Multi-language support, enabling EC languages to be handled correctly and to provide basic translations between them. The services offered by I-SEEC include a Technical Information Centre, Waste Exchange Centre, Electronic News Service, Calculation and Software Centre, Who's Who in Construction, Specialist Equipment Directory and a Best Practice Information service. The CONNET infrastructure and the I-SEEC information services provide the means to promote effective use of information by construction industry professionals in an efficient and cost-effective way. The ability to pass queries from one high quality service to another in a different country is a substantial contribution to the CIB goal of providing information to achieve performance. This paper draws out lessons learned - both technological and practical - in the course of this multi-country initiative to develop a portal for the construction industry. It also invites participation in this open initiative and describes how existing and developing services across the world can be made interoperable within a CONNET (and any Internet portal) environment.

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Full text: content.pdf (416,345 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2001 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.economic (0.056731) class.deployment (0.046867) class.collaboration (0.041581)
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Permission to reproduce these documents have been graciously provided by CSIR Building and Construction Technology. The assistance of the editors, Mr. Gustav Coetzee and Mr. Frances Boshoff, is gratefully appreciated.


Dan H,Yasumuro Y,Ishigaki T,Nishigata T

3d scan planning of outdoor constructions based on photogrammetric model and mathematical optimization

Abstract: A 3D scanner is capable of capturing surface shapes of the objects as a set of point cloud and is extending its applicability toward examining, re-designing and preserving the existing constructions as well as on-site information for BIM. One of the most difficult problems to collect complete surface data of outdoor constructions is to avoid self and mutual occlusions. If we want to collect complete data for covering whole surfaces of the constructions, then we have to measure them from multiple points usually. Moreover, multiple measurements require plenty of time and labor, and each measurement gives a data set consisting of hundreds of millions of 3D points to be processed for further computations. So it is very important to make an effective measurement plan a priori for avoiding redundancy for both labor and computational costs. In this research, therefore, we propose a method for 3D-scan planning of outdoor constructions based on photogrammetric models and mathematical optimization methods. In our proposed method, we first use photogrammetric techniques and make a rough 3D model of measurement scenery: we take photographs of the targets by a calibrated digital camera, and find corresponding characteristic points over the photographs, for example corners and intersection points of edge lines. Next, we triangulate the corresponding points by using 3D photo-modeling software. Finally, we obtain the rough 3D mesh model. After that, we make the optimal scan plan based on the rough 3D mesh model by using some mathematical methods: we examine the visibility and self/mutual occlusion property of each polygon of the 3D mesh, and calculate the minimum number of measurement points and their layout to scan all the surfaces of the targets. Moreover, our proposed method can calculate the optimal layout of the designated number of measurement points to maximize the obtainable data.

Keywords: 3D-Scan Planning,Photogrammetric Model,Mathematical Optimization

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Series: convr:2013 (browse)
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Gul, Leman; Gu, Ning; and Williams, Anthony

A New Approach to Design Education: Evaluations of 3D Virtual Worlds on Design Teaching and Learning

Abstract: With the recent developments in information and communication technologies, 3D virtual worlds have the potential to make a major contribution to design education as constructivist learning environments. Considering the changing trend in design education, we have been employing cutting-edge technologies in our design teaching, allowing students to collaborate within the 3D virtual environments such as Second Life (www.secondlife.com) and Active Worlds (www.activeworlds.com), which support synchronized design communication and real-time 3D modeling. This paper reports our teaching experience and the students’ learning experience, based on team-based design and communication skills-building in 3D virtual environments and presents the challenges faced by design education. In this paper, we will firstly provide a critical analysis of various design learning and teaching features in 3D virtual environments as constructivist learning environments, and secondly identify issues which address the core skills and cognitive processes involved when designing in 3D virtual environments.

Keywords: 3D virtual worlds, design teaching and learning, affordances and constraints

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Series: convr:2007 (browse)
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Guss C

Virtual teams, project management processes and the construction industry

Abstract: Process is the "action of going through, a progressive forward movement from one point to another, with the goal of reaching an end point" 1. Project managers in the construction industry tend to regard process as the completion of separate technical tasks to reach an end. What project managers do not ask is, what happens in the process of communicating that contributes to a successful or poor project. The answer remains elusive because project managers expend energy finding better management tools and techniques, not communication processes to help expose and overcome limitations and inefficiencies of projects. Some tools provide a means to examine overall project success, but typically discrete time phases are examined in projects. Deming’s teachings are clear in that improvement in the quality of projects demand improvements in processes. One of the key process improvements that the construction industry needs to make is the area of communication to facilitate the transfer of knowledge between teams and projects. In the future, the industry will find it more difficult to rely on tacit knowledge (on the job know-how) of organizations or individuals in virtual environments.movement from one point to another, with the goal of reaching an end point” 1. Project managers in the construction industry tend to regard process as the completion of separate technical tasks to reach an end. What project managers do not ask is, what happens in the process of communicating that contributes to a successful or poor project. The answer remains elusive because project managers expend energy finding better management tools and techniques, not communication processes to help expose and overcome limitations and inefficiencies of projects. Some tools provide a means to examine overall project success, but typically discrete time phases are examined in projects. Deming’s teachings are clear in that improvement in the quality of projects demand improvements in processes. One of the key process improvements that the construction industry needs to make is the area of communication to facilitate the transfer of knowledge between teams and projects. In the future, the industry will find it more difficult to rely on tacit knowledge (on the job know-how) of organizations or individuals in virtual environments. Global trends to outsource work and downsize employee pools combined with the widespread availability of telecommunications devices continue to push organizations into considering ‘virtual employment’. Despite knowing that additional full-time employees often cause greater negative utility, the construction business continues to lag behind in use of communication technology and in the development of virtual teams. In the future, a shift to virtual teams will be a consequence of the need for high speed communication of new ideas among experts world-wide, for a competitive edge. Challenges are in using telecommunications tools to overcome geographic and psychological distance in managerial and technical communication. This paper discusses the future need for virtual teams in the construction industry. Some useful communication processes and technologies that facilitate a transition to virtual teams are introduced. These include: desktop videoconferencing, public video networks, Group Decision Support Systems, and the Internet. Advances in procurement capability is discussed to show impacts on the construction industry.

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Full text: content.pdf (60,477 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:1996 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.education (0.033332) class.communication (0.027279) class.social (0.025990)
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Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by the University of Ljubljana. The assistance of the editor, Prof. Ziga Turk, is gratefully appreciated.


J Du, R Liu

On the Edge of Human Computation: Interactive Parametric Estimating Paradigm

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Full text: content.pdf (115,751 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2014 (browse)
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J. Ye, T.M. Hassan, C.D. Carter & A. Zarli

ICT for Energy Efficiency: The Case for Smart Buildings

Abstract: Economic growth is increasing the demand for energy. Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) have been identified to play an important role in reducing the energy intensity and increasing the energy efficiency of the European Union (EU) economy. ICT will not only improve energy efficiency and help combat climate change, they will also stimulate the development of a large leading-edge market for ICT enabled energy-efficiency technologies that will foster the competitiveness of European industry and create new business opportunities. As ICT are today pervasive to all industrial and business domains, they are expected to generate deep impacts in energy efficiency of buildings of tomorrow. Although versatile statistical information is available on energy consumption in different buildings, there is still limited understanding about the potential of ICT to reduce energy consumption. In order to put ICT at the core of the energy efficiency effort and to enable reaching its full potential, it is necessary to foster research and development (R&D) into novel ICT-based solutions and strengthen their take-up — so that the energy intensity of the economy can be further reduced by adding intelligence to components, equipment and services. In this paper, ICT based support tools to energy efficiency in the so-called smart buildings are investigated. The state-of-the-art in ICT for smart buildings is discussed with focuses on the role of ICT and key fundamental fields in which R&D efforts are needed to enable the energy efficiency in future smart buildings. Five key areas including design and simulation tools, interoperability/standards, building automation, smart metering and user-awareness tools have been identified where there is potential to improve energy efficiency through the use of ICT, and they are considered as the next generation ICT for future smart buildings. As an energy efficient housing example, the Lighthouse built in the UK is discussed in detail along with its ICT integrated building services and demonstration data of energy use. This gives a better understanding of the impacts of ICT on the energy efficiency in buildings. The paper concludes that in order to achieve the energy efficiency in buildings, further support of multidisciplinary R&D and innovation demonstrating the potential of ICT based solutions are needed to foster and accelerate the deployment of energy efficient solutions in buildings.

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Series: w78:2009 (browse)
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Lok M

San Francisco international airport: eye on progress

Abstract: With an eye on airport safety and future expansion, San Francisco International Airport has been investing in state-of-the-art computer technology to improve facilities maintenance, speed construction projects, and reduce operation costs. Since the San Francisco Chamber of Commerce purchased the 100 acres off Old Bayshore Highway at the edge of South San Francisco in 1927, the Airport has been continuously expanding and increasing in complexity with each decade. With every expansion and increase in passenger load, more and more tools are required to maintain the Airport and keep it functioning. Therefore, when the Airport started preparing for another expansion, the elements were already in place for the development of a geographical information system (GIS). The GIS will be the foundation for other systems, such as automated facilities management or computer aided dispatch to eventually create an overall computerized information model of the airport properties including a three-dimensional electronic model of the airfield and facilities. The decision to computerize was designed to increase the efficiency and safety of the Airport in a broad range of functions.

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Full text: content.pdf (879,966 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:1995 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.commerce (0.020800) class.synthesis (0.012902) class.economic (0.012446)
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Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by the Stanford University, USA. The support of the editors, particularly Prof. Fischer is gratefully appreciated.


Mohammed Kishk, Richard Laing, Martin Edge, and Jonathan Scott

An Integrated Framework For The Optimal Selection Of Hospital Finishes - System Proposal And Methodology

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Series: w78:2006 (browse)
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Naaranoia M

Approach for strategic decisions in cad development in design offices

Abstract: The primary goal of this paper is to present a decision-making process for managers of a design group. The aim of the process is to improve significantly the competitiveness of the company in such a way that it uses and supports: competence and development of individuals; creativity; and trends in CAD. The proposed approach for strategic decisions in CAD development (figure 1) consists of seven stages: the performance objectives for CAD development; selection of action plan; preliminary development project review; selection; managing the benefits, costs and risks during the implementation; post evaluation; and competitive edge evaluation.

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Series: ecce:1997 (browse)
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