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Wang W, Zhang D, Sun D

The representation of design cases in building construction

Abstract: The integrated utilisation of 'design cases with different types of generalised knowledge raises particular issues on the representation and memory organisation of design cases. The complexity of the design process in bdclmg construction and the lack of design intentions in building project documents make these issues even more important in creating integrated case-based design systems in this domain. What makes up a design case, how it is acquired and represented, how specific knowledge in design cases can be efficiently used and integrated with generalised knowledge, and how to organise case memory are addressed in this paper. Based on our previous experiences in developing case-based design systems and exploring heterogeneous knowledge memory, two schemes for design case representation and case memory organisation are presented. They are discussed in terms of content of cases, method of acquisition, framework of representation, and organisation of case memory.

Keywords: case-based reasoning; integrated design system; case representation; case acquisition; case memory organisation

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Series: w78:1993 (browse)
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Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by the National University of Singapore. The assistance of the editors, particularly Prof. Martin Betts, is gratefully appreciated.


Watson A S, Crowley A J, Boyle A D , Knowles G M

Practical problems in the development of product models

Abstract: This paper is concerned with the practical difficulties encountered when developing Product Models for information exchange within the construction industry. It is based on experiences gained since 1987 from involvement in the Pan-European Eureka CIMSTEEL Project (within which a model for constructional steelwork is being developed) and from a more recent national research project (CI-PM) concerned with Product Models and construction (within which a reinforced concrete model will be developed), The paper addresses the questions of what a Product Model is, and what its role is in the management of information at a project level. The paper then moves on to consider the practical problems faced by the developers of such models; considering such aspects as the industrial context, modelling methodologies and software tools, differing viewpoints and validation. The authors highlight areas where progress in addressing these problems is being made.

Keywords: product model; management of information; construction industry

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Full text: content.pdf (567,330 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:1993 (browse)
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Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by the National University of Singapore. The assistance of the editors, particularly Prof. Martin Betts, is gratefully appreciated.


Woksepp S, Tullberg O

VR modeling in built & environment - some experiences and directions in site operations

Abstract: In this paper, we will share our experiences of producing a Virtual Reality (VR) model of a large and complex building, and indicate some areas where this can be implemented in the normal planning and construction process. The approach will be applied in an actual project the building of a new hotel and office block in Gothenburg, Sweden. The relevance of the VR model created in this study was investigated and reported separately (Woksepp, 2002). The VR concept used in this study can briefly be described as: Firstly, a 3D model was created from traditional paper and 2D/3D CAD drawings. Then, the 3D model was imported into a rendering program where mapping coordinates, textures and additional objects were added. The complete model was then converted to a suitable VR format. Finally, the model was imported to a VR visualisation tool where additional user oriented features were added. Although the method used to produce the VR model described in this paper by no means represents the optimal course of action, we can nevertheless conclude that the investment required to create a VR model is low, while offering extensive potential. Our on-site research demonstrated widespread agreement that the VR model enhanced understanding of the building for all involved. This study relates not only the experiences gained from producing the VR model and the new directions this has opened up, but also certain new issues of interest for future studies.

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Full text: content.pdf (200,538 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2003 (browse)
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Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by the University of Auckland. The assistance of the editor who provided the full texts and the structured metadata, Dr. Robert Amor, is gratefully appreciated.


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