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Li H-X,Liu H,Zhou X,Sun C,Ngan K-H,Al-Hussein M

Cash flow optimization and visualization of residence housing for builders

Abstract: Cash flow management is widely considered to be a key issue within the construction industry, especially for residential homebuilders. Cash flow in the residential housing industry involves multiple stakeholders, such as lot developers, banks, clients, trades, and builders - usually the builder initiates a complex plan involving lot procurement, construction investment, and housing sales, which has the potential to lead to more profitable solutions for the builder. This research develops a decision support system subject to variable developer and bank payment schedules, and is based on a twofold objective: (1) Maximize cumulative (negative) cash flows, subject to the guaranteed net present value (NPV) for developers and bank. The optimum solutions help builders to stay within the bank overdraft limit and reduce the pressure of cash demands for builders. (2) Maximize builder’s NPV and increase the NPVs of developers and banks as much as possible. With the multi-objective optimization, the win-win optimal solutions serve as negotiation strategies between these stakeholders. The proposed decision making system is highlighted by the application of visualization techniques - two types of visualization techniques, i.e., a combined Excel and add-in and a preliminary Augmented Reality (AR), are utilized to illustrate the optimizing process and the optimal solutions, with the cash inflows, outflows, and the net cash flows for different time periods displayed dynamically. A case study based on a project in Edmonton, Canada is utilized to demonstrate the proposed methodology.

Keywords: Cash Flow Management,Cash Flow Optimization,Residential Housing,Builder,Visualization,Decision Support System

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Full text: content.pdf (1,025,928 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: convr:2013 (browse)
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Léon van Berlo, Mathijs Natrop and Gerwin Korpershoek

Collaborative Engineering with IFC and BCF: Managing Openings and Recesses

Abstract: In a BIM data flow, an essential part of the coordination between disciplines is the agreement on recesses and openings in building elements. Different disciplines will request recesses and openings in elements that are managed and maintained by others. Using the full dataset of the elements has proven to be inoperable because of the information overload, interoperability problems and contradictions in the commonly used downstream dataflow. A group of companies has been experimenting with the exchange of data that only consists of the requested openings and recesses in IFC. Coordination is being done using BCF. This approach has been fine-tuned and adjusted during several projects. This paper describes the current status of that initiative and discusses the challenges that are still open.

Keywords: BIM, Coordination, Interoperability, Exchange

DOI: https://doi.org/10.24928/JC3-2017/0194

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Series: jc3:2017 (browse)
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M Hooper, A Ekholm

A Definition of Model Information Content for Strategic BIM Implementation

Abstract: In response to the increased early workflow implied by BIM processes it is important for design consultants to focus on creating and communicating information that is critical for its purpose (Jernigan 2008) - be it model content for 3d Design Coordination at scheme design stage, or Cost Estimation at Design Development stage, or generation of a suitable Record Model for Facilities Management. Today, with many of the technological matters of integrated information management dealt with (perhaps excluding the matter of interoperability), defining the content and status of BIM information deliveries remains both a practical and theoretical problem. A development of a participant-friendly method of articulating BIM content is required to clarify what information is needed when and conversely what information is indeed not needed to implement a BIM process at a particular stage in a construction project. Priority must be placed on the information that is vital for current tasks without getting distracted by desires to populate models with additional or other information or objects masking the absence of key information. Here there is a lack of existing knowledge to solve this practical problem.New BIM tools and new design processes and procedures have led to a certain confusion of what information is needed when for particular BIM uses. This report seeks to explore and enable a method of defining the content of model information deliverables through a review of 2 key primary specific BIM uses: 3d Design Coordination and Early Energy Appraisal through an analysis of practical application.The scope of this study is limited to a review of information flow within residential projects in a Swedish context and looks at two case projects with a view to identifying and establishing a common definition of the key BIM objects and properties necessary for particular tasks. The study follows a case construction project together with an experimental pilot design project with the purpose of extracting and recording what data is needed to carry out parallel and sequential BIM uses with optimised efficiency. By mapping both processes and the precise information needed to successfully carry out tasks, improved productivity can be realised and a greater quality of design output produced.The key deliverable from this study is the BIM-Info Delivery Protocol (IDP) which attempts to align consultant BIM-Info delivery expectations and represents a tangible solution to assist consultant disciplines manage BIM-Info.

Keywords: BIM, Building Information Modelling, information exchange, model information content

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Series: w78:2011 (browse)
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Magdic A, Rebolj D, Cus Babic N, Radosavljevic M

Mobile computing in construction

Abstract: This paper initially presents the potential use of mobile computing in the construction industry. However, it is further assumed that the use of mobile computing can significantly improve the flow of relevant information among the project participants only if the present organisational culture is subject to changes. That is further supported with the results from the experimental study of the potential use of various mobile computing devices in the project information exchange procedures. In this respect only cost effective, commonly available and standardised solutions would prove a project-wide applicability. The final objective of the paper is to show why should be further research on mobile computing more focused on identifying the weaknesses of the present project information exchange procedures and their optimisation according to the applied IT in order to employ all of its advantages.

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Full text: content.pdf (432,819 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2002 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.man-man (0.055239) class.impact (0.015917) class.economic (0.011324)
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Permission to reproduce these documents have been graciously provided by the Aarhus School of Architecture, Denmark. The assistnace of the editor, Prof. Kristian Agger, is gratefully aprecciated.


Mahmoud O. Abou-Beih, Tamer E. El-Diraby, Baher A. Abdulhai

Coordinating Urban Incident Management & Reconstruction Using Social Web

Abstract: The enormous widespread and relative maturity of collaborative and social applications in Web 2.0 has encouraged metropolitans worldwide to incorporate them into their emergency management systems. This paper describes SWIMS (Semantic Web Based Incident Management System), a middleware system that integrates Web 2.0 collaborative/social applications with software agent technologies on GIS-based platform in an aim to enhance emergency management practices in urban transportation networks. The paper then compares the IT needs of this domain (incident management domain) with those of construction IT. A set of lessons and similarities are explored to guide the development of a collaborative, process-oriented system for urban incident management. Three of the main goals behind developing SWIMS are: (i) efficient information dissemination to increase public awareness of current emergency conditions in order to influence their commuting decisions, (ii) increase public participation in emergencies reporting and description to enhance the efficiency of emergency response processes, (iii) and provide a GIS-based middleware for optimized response resources allocation and management.When it comes to emergency reporting, finding equilibrium between public participation and information credibility is crucial for the system success. In this context, the authors propose a model to validate the integrity of received information; helping to provide a good balance between public participation and information reliability. In addition the paper illustrates the role of software agents in handling the enormous continuous flow of data resulting from massive anticipated public participation and due to the nature of emergency management process in general. Agents communicate using asynchronous message passing, acting as an interface between various Web 2.0 collaboration systems and SWIMS. This also helps to overcome any syntax and/or schematic heterogeneity between SWIMS and collaborative applications data structures. The roles of software agents in response resources allocation and management as well as coordination of relief efforts and decision updates are also discussed. The experiences in developing and implementing this project are thoroughly discussed and analyzed in this paper.

Keywords: multi-agent system, GIS, incident management, social web

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Full text: content.pdf (912,710 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2010 (browse)
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Maydl P, Nausner A, Rysavy E

Organizing the information flow within a planning team: experiences, problems and solutions from a practically-oriented R&D-project

Abstract: Within the scope of the research project "Virtual Technology Park - Resource Saving inConstruction" a new approach was developed to reduce resource consumption (materials, energy,money) over the lifetime of a building. Furthermore, flexibility in planning should increase byimplementing combined organizational and technical measures to improve information flow duringthe planning process.To reach this goal, appropriate tools are needed: content-related, on the organizational level, andsupported by an "enabling infrastructure". The respective project results are a computational modelto assess the resource consumption for a building over its lifetime, an Information DependencyMatrix to improve project manageability, and employment of a document management system tofacilitate data exchange and co-ordination between project members.

Keywords: Virtual Technology Park, Virtual Enterprise, information requirements, informationdependency, document management, data management, resources, communication

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Full text: content.pdf (187,402 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: ecce:2001 (browse)
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Mecca S, Marco M

An IT oriented approach supporting the integration of technical risk, quality, environment and safety management in construction

Abstract: "I.T Context I.T. plays a key role to connect risk management with an integrated three dimension management system integrating quality, environment and safety management. Planning Techniques in construction aims to support the decision integration in the on/off site interfaces of construction processes. Starting just from the design phase the quality management strategies integrated with the performance theory allow to formulate a full list of requirements for project activities which can effectively stored in product models of construction elements. The technical risk analysis aims to operate a large performances analysis in on/off site processes. The risk analysis supports quality management in construction planning for determining a graduation of levels of performance required to the management system, which means identifying the specific project criticality in time, cost and quality fields and combining the most appropriate measures of prevention. Objective The objective for the developing research has been focussed on a planning technique integrating the information flow from the design phase to the construction process, oriented to allow the main contractor and the subcontractors to utilize quality plans schemas and risk analysis deriving from design phases as input in the risk analysis detailing and quality plans refinement. Methodology By a widespread collaborative analysis, dealt with an AI planning methodology applied in the construction domain, it might be possible to identify all actions aiming at reducing and preventing failure risk, intended as specific non conformance risk of elements and activities characteristics, and develop the right organizing strategies to increase the contractor's reactivity toward failure and defects. The Failure Mode and Effect Analysis (FMEA) methodology and the quality management applied to the construction planning are developed by means an intensive data exchange involving the project operators – e.g. designer, owner, contractor and subcontractor – in identifying the failure risk and in planning the prevention and control measures. Results An experimental FMEA system for analyzing risk factors in construction planning is advanced. Based on a schema of integrated tools, the techniques aims to provide a cooperative planning system toward a systematic approach representing a non conformance technical risk analysis in construction management."

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Full text: content.pdf (255,308 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2000 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.communication (0.020367) class.strategies (0.019228) class.environment (0.016653)
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Permission to reproduce these documents have been graciously provided by Icelandic Building Research Institute. The assistance of the editor, Mr. Gudni Gudnason, is gratefully appreciated


Mittrup I, Smarsly K, Hartmann D, Bettzieche V

An agent-based approach to dam monitoring

Abstract: Software agents - autonomous, mobile and intelligent software programs - provide all the necessary characteristics to innovate and accelerate the development of distributed applications. They represent powerful and robust software technology for implementing distributed collaborative work flows and complex interaction. Applying software agents, the Institute of Computational Engineering, in cooperation with the Ruhrverband (Ruhr River Association) is taking an innovative approach to develop a modern dam monitoring system, which is capable of supporting the collaborative work of experts involved in monitoring. While the conventional computer-based monitoring systems consider the remote monitoring, the presentation and the electronic transfer of measured data, the present agent-based approach is focusing the distributed work flow of data analysis and safety assessment. Consequently, the complete work flow of dam monitoring is mapped onto a multi-agent system: regularly performed tasks (e.g. measuring at the dam) are carried out by task-oriented agents. In addition, the involved human experts are assisted by personal agents, which allow a direct communication with the multiagent system and provide access to specific tasks. Associated with the known advantages of the agent technology, such as robustness and mobility, the introduced concept is a significant enhancement compared to conventional monitoring applications. The present paper gives a short introduction to dam monitoring, outlines the selected design of the agent-based dam monitoring system and provides an insight into the current implementation. It is to be pointed out that the realization is still incomplete and a matter of research.

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Series: w78:2003 (browse)
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Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by the University of Auckland. The assistance of the editor who provided the full texts and the structured metadata, Dr. Robert Amor, is gratefully appreciated.


Nobuyuki Suzuki, Aketo Suzuki, and Masanori Hamada

Anti-Disaster Planning Based On The Information Flow Characteristic On Sociometric Network

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Full text: content.pdf (944,120 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2006 (browse)
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Oostra M

Stimulating innovation by making project-related information available on internet

Abstract: Nonaka and Takeuchi state in their book 'The knowledge-creating company' that product development is the very process in an organisation to generate new knowledge. This makes product development an important motor for acquiring new knowledge in a line of business like the building industry. Product innovations in our industry are due to initiatives by a range of parties. These parties start from an assumption of what should be technically feasible when initiating innovation. Of these parties, manufacturers are generally regarded as the ultimate product developers. Innovation in the form of new products contributes much to safeguard the continuity of the firm. Since their interest is survival and they focus on certain production techniques, most manufacturers are well aware of technical developments within their field. Manufacturers have a great interest in making the new product known to the world. They therefore diffuse selected information of their products to the industry. Manufacturers are, however, not the only actors initiating development of building products, architects play an important role as well: they can initiate project-related product development. Since architects operate as generalists within the industry, combining different products and techniques to realise their buildings, they can not be completely informed on the latest technological developments. In order to realise products, which are tailor made to the project, they therefore need the expertise of others; manufacturers, contractors and/or different advisors. It is here where the availability of information on expertise and interest becomes important to the architects. On the other hand, nobody really has a specific interest in promoting project-related products. This means that this type of information is only passed along accidentally and not intentionally. As a result, knowledge related to these specially developed products diffuses very slow compared to knowledge related to standard products, or in the worst case the information disappears altogether. Dissemination of information or technology transfer is an important condition for achieving innovation, as shown by Rogers in his book 'Diffusion of innovations'. To stimulate project-related innovation that is initiated by architects, the information flow within the industry needs to be smoothened. Architects do not want to be disturbed with all this technical and product information when they do not need it. However, a database containing this information that would be accessible via the Internet when it is needed by the architects would be the most optimal solution.

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Full text: content.pdf (218,762 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2000 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.bestPractise (0.021362) class.education (0.014322) class.collaboration (0.009822)
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Permission to reproduce these documents have been graciously provided by Icelandic Building Research Institute. The assistance of the editor, Mr. Gudni Gudnason, is gratefully appreciated


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