Welcome
Digital library of construction informatics
and information technology in civil engineering and construction
 

Works 

Search Results

Facilitated by the SciX project

Hits 11 to 20 of 144

Anumba Chimay

Industry uptake of construction IT innovations - key elements of a proactive strategy

Abstract: There is general agreement that the construction industry's uptake of innovations in Construction IT is disappointing, particularly when considered in relation to the huge research effort and expenditure being invested in this field. This is of growing concern to research funding agencies, Construction IT researchers, and some industry practitioners, albeit for very different reasons. This paper examines some of the reasons for this low uptake of Construction IT innovations, drawing on examples of specific technologies and research projects, where appropriate. It highlights the need for partnerships and closer working arrangements between the key actors and stakeholders - researchers, funding agencies, software developers, end-users and industry managers. The paper outlines the key elements of a framework within which technology transfer from research to practice will thrive, and concludes with a review of several initiatives that seek to address the low uptake of Construction IT innovations.

Keywords:

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf (45,709 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:1998 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.bestPractise (0.022337) class.education (0.014975) class.strategies (0.009723)
Similar papers:
Sound: read aloud.

Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden. The assistance of the editors, Prof. Bo-Christer Björk and Dr. Adina Jägbeck, is gratefully appreciated.


Appelqvist I, Keiljer U

Building integrity - interactions between building parts, systems and the actors of the building process

Abstract: Many of the problems concerning poor effectivity, low quality and increased cost in the building process pertain to the area of interaction between building parts, elements, spaces and systems. The industrialisation of the building industry requires a more profound understanding of these interactions. An increasing number of actors and suppliers are involved in the building process which implies interactions related to the organisation of the process. Thus, the interaction problems do not confine themselves to physical parts and technical issues. The organisation of the process, responsibilities and liabilities of consultants, subcontractors and other actors contribute to the growing implications of the variety of interactions that constitute the problem in its whole. An analysis of the general problem, which has been addressed as Building Integrity, BI, has commenced From a systems design point of view, BI is related to the ongoing research on building modelling, which is discussed briefly.

Keywords:

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf (1,870,258 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:1994 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.man-software (0.041949) class.social (0.017435) class.analysis (0.010768)
Similar papers:
Sound: read aloud.

Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by VTT, Espoo, Finland.


Arif A A, Karam A H

A comparative study: with insight into the use of IT in local architectural practices

Abstract: This paper reports on the use of Information Technologies (IT) in the South African building industry. It offers an insight into the architecture profession, a profession that plays a major role in the construction sector. The analysis is based on the results of a survey conducted in the Western Cape Province during the year 2000. In an attempt to uncover the similarities and differences between the local context and the international one, this paper outlines a few elements of IT for comparison. After a brief introduction to the IT map of South Africa, the analysis concentrates on the following four issues: Response and Respondents, General IT usage, Use of Computer-Aided-Design (CAD) and Use of Networks. Each of these issues is framed in both the local and the international contexts. Despite the shortcomings of using different questions with different emphasis when referring to other surveys, it is still believed that reporting on local practices is not extremely meaningful in isolation. It is hoped that this type of analysis will serve to unravel the particulars of the construction industry in South Africa providing its counterparts with a new perspective.

Keywords:

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf (141,121 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2003 (browse)
Cluster:
Class:
Similar papers:
Sound: N/A.

Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by the University of Auckland. The assistance of the editor who provided the full texts and the structured metadata, Dr. Robert Amor, is gratefully appreciated.


Arif A, Karam A

Architectural Practices and Their Use of IT in the Western Cape Province, South Africa

Abstract: The application of Information Technologies (IT) is moving forward with tremendous speed affecting all industries and professions; our building profession is no exception. To identify the extent of IT application in the building construction context of South Africa, a survey was conducted in the year 2000; it included IT as one of the many topics investigated. The Western Cape Province (WCP) was selected as the first subject of the ambitious national survey. The survey provides insight into the particular patterns in IT applications within the local architectural industry of the WCP and tracks its implications in terms of human resources and technical needs. This research paper presents a focused perspective of the findings of the survey on the local practices; their general profile, their computer technology profiles, their particular applications of technology and finally the effect of computer use on the profitability and cost reduction of their practices. The data presented in this paper highlights the high numbers of small-sized offices as a general characteristic of the local profile. Although a good percentage of these small offices seem to have a high need and use for IT applications, larger-sized offices are totally computerised and are all networked as well. The use of computers is clearly concentrated in three areas: administration, communication in addition to the core activity of construction drawings production. The survey reveals a major dependency on computer-aided-design (CAD) software where its use extends, in most cases, to clients' presentations. This dependency makes high demands on staff and principals' literacy and on the high competency levels needed for their use of technology. On the financial effect of IT use, many practices are not fully convinced that there is an actual reduction in their running costs. The exception occurs in the case of practices run by principals who use computers themselves; they have a positive perception of the financial benefits of technology. This research establishes a baseline from which to scale the progress in the use and application of IT in the architectural profession, being a key player in the construction industry. It serves as a measure for future surveys of the other provinces. It is hoped that it provides a foundation for many assumptions made by practitioners, technologists, consultants and educators of this field.

Keywords: Architecture - South Africa, Architectural Practices, Building Construction, Computer-Aided-Design (CAD), Survey - Cape Town

DOI:

Full text: http://www.itcon.org/2001/2 (available to registered users only)

Series: itcon:2001 (browse)
Cluster:
Class:
Similar papers:
Sound: read aloud.


Bakens W

CIB in a period of transition

Abstract: Introductory presentation by the CIB Secretary General.

Keywords:

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf (26,316 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:1996 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class:
Similar papers:
Sound: read aloud.

Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by the University of Ljubljana. The assistance of the editor, Prof. Ziga Turk, is gratefully appreciated.


Bakkeren W, Willems P

Capturing and structuring the meaning of communication in the building and construction industry

Abstract: Integration of the computer applications used in the building industry requires information systems that support the communication between these applications. Cyrently this communication is realised via human interpretation and understanding. An important question in this context is: "what makes communication meaningful?". The meaning of communication has two aspects: (1) the intention: the general idea behind the communication, and (2) the extension: the set of things to which the communication applies. This paper describes these aspects of meaning and mechanisms used by human beings to define meaning. To enable information systems to support communication the intention and the extension must be represented in a computer interpretable form. The representations should be manageable, reusable and extendable. This requires structuring of the representations, which can be achieved by modular modelling and layering, This paper describes these stucturing mechanisms.

Keywords: meaning of communication; representation of meaning; structuring representations; modularity; layering

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf (788,765 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:1993 (browse)
Cluster:
Class:
Similar papers:
Sound: read aloud.

Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by the National University of Singapore. The assistance of the editors, particularly Prof. Martin Betts, is gratefully appreciated.


Bedard C

The validation of integrated CAD in building engineering design

Abstract: The need and the urgency to develop integrated CAD software for building design are well established in industry and academia alike. The means and the approach to achieve this objective are however not soclear and do not meet with general agreement. Even the final product itself - integrated CAD - has different meanings for different people.Like other research groups in building studies, we have developed a number of integrated building design systems in the last few years thateffectively combine different activities and types of expertise in a unified approach. For these successful research initiatives, the fundamental issue of validation remains a very difficult one to answer properly. On the one hand, reference cases do not exist to benchmark the operation of an integrated system, as in the case of experimental or empirical processes. On the other hand, no clear guidelines have emergedyet from commercial software developers in the construction industry that claim to have achieved 'integrated CAD' as soon as some form of file transfer exists between an application software and a CAD package.From the study of some integrated CAD systems for building design recently developed in industry and at the CBS, this paper will attempt tocircumscribe the main aspects of the validation issue, e.g. what are the characteristics of integrated CAD ? what kind of performance is expected from such systems ? are current systems delivering what building design practitioners need ?

Keywords:

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf (426,635 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:1992 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.bestPractise (0.020523) class.education (0.013759) class.synthesis (0.011254)
Similar papers:
Sound: read aloud.

Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by Research Press of the National Research Council of Canada. The support of the editor, Dr. Dana Vanier, is gratefully appreciated.


Bjork, Bo-Christer

Requirements and information structures for building product data models

Abstract: The term computer-integrated construction (CIC) is often used to describe a future type of construction process characterised by the extensive use of information technology. The key to successful CIC is the comprehensive integration of currently isolated computing applications in different phases of the construction process. Among the several types of data exchange standards needed to support such integration, the standards for structuring the information describing buildings (building product data models) are particularly important. No fully operational building product data models have as yet been formally standardised either on the national or international level, but the topic has been a subject of intensive research during the last few years. Building product data model proposals are usually defined using object-oriented information modelling techniques. The research which is presented in this summarising thesis was carried out primarily during the years 1988-92 at the Technical Research Centre of Finland. The report begins with a brief introduction to the general background of research concerning CIC and building product data models. Fundamental concepts of object orientation and product modelling are explained in a separate chapter. In order to position the author's research results, the "state of the art" in this research field is briefly reviewed. The research results are presented against the background of a kernel-aspect model framework, in line with current thinking among several leading researchers in this field. The results can loosely be classified into three distinctive groups: a number of requirements which building product data models should fulfil; specific information structures in building product data models; and the integration of product models with other types of information used in the construction process. The specific information structures which were studied include the abstraction hierarchies used in building product data models, the type object mechanism and information structures needed for modelling spaces and enclosing objects. The report ends with a discussion of the results, comparing them with the proposals and results of other researchers. Some directions for further research are also outlined.

Keywords: Building Product model, computer-integrated construction

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf (515,455 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: other (browse)
Cluster:
Class:
Similar papers:
Sound: N/A.


Bouchlaghem N M, Liyanage I G

Virtual reality applications in the UK's construction industry

Abstract: A survey has been conducted to investigate the use of Virtual Reality and its applications within the construction industry in the UK. It surveyed the general perception of the new technology and its potential in improving design and construction processes as seen by practitioners in the industry and reviewed the work being undertaken by researchers in the academics' field.In recent years there has been attempts to apply Virtual Reality to various sectors of the construction industry, however due to the high cost of the new technology in terms of hardware and software most of these applications, as shown by the survey, remain unknown by the construction practitioners. The survey also showed that there is a lack of understanding of the new technology that is not surprising in an environment where even some more traditional aspects of IT are still to be improved to achieve the intended purposes.The survey first traced the history of Virtual Reality applications and its developments during the last forty years and then reviewed the different systems available in terms of hardware and software. It discussed the level of sophistication offered from desk top to fully immersive comparing and contrasting them with traditional visualisation techniques. A review of current and potential applications of VR in the construction industry was also undertaken covering those sectors likely to benefit the most from it. Design applications were found to be at a more advanced stage due to the fact that computer visualisation and modelling techniques have always been an important part of building design. However attempts to use the technology as a tool to improve construction processes have been made but most of them are still at the development stage.The results of the survey are presented and discussed in this paper and the future role of VR in the construction industry is debated in the light of the current and proposed work by researchers in the field.

Keywords:

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf (37,336 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:1996 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.roadmaps (0.036580) class.strategies (0.029776) class.environment (0.015793)
Similar papers:
Sound: read aloud.

Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by the University of Ljubljana. The assistance of the editor, Prof. Ziga Turk, is gratefully appreciated.


Bourdeau L, Dubois A-M, Poyet P

A common data model for computer integrated building

Abstract: The connection of various building performance evaluation tools in a collaborative way is an essential request to develop true CAD systems. It is a basic requirement for the future of integrated information systems for building projects, where the data concerning the multiple aspects can be exchanged during the different design steps. This paper deals with the on-going research concerning the generation of a common data model in the framework of a European collaborative action, the COMBINE Project , which is supported by the CEC, General Directorate XI1 for Research Science and Development, within the JOULE programme. The first step of the research concerns the progressive construction of a conceptual model and the paper focuses on the development of this Integrated Data Model (IDM). The paper reports on the definition of the architecture of the IDM. The main issues and the methodology of the IDM development are presented.The IDM development methodology is based on successive steps dealing with the identification of the data and context which are considered by the Design Tool Prototypes (DTP) to be connected through the IDM, the conceptual integration of this knowledge, and the implementation of the model on an appropriate software environment.

Keywords:

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf (1,370,970 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:1991 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.communication (0.048499) class.environment (0.016386) class.represent (0.010886)
Similar papers:
Sound: read aloud.

Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by Eindhoven University of Technology.


For more results click below:

 

hosted by University of Ljubljana



includes

W78




© itc.scix.net 2003
show page 1 this is page 2 show page 3 show page 4 show page 5 show page 6 show page 7 ... show page 15 Home page of this database login Powered by SciX Open Publishing Services 1.002 February 16, 2003