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Bento J, Azevedo J, Oliveira C S

Predicting ground otion descriptions through artificial neural networks

Abstract: "The present paper addresses the problem of predicting the description of an expected earthquake through the associated ground motion record that would be recorded at a given site. For that purpose, a number of previous ground motion records referring to 100 different earthquakes occurring within a reasonably small geographic area (Northern California) have been acquired and processed in order to extract some of the features that could describe them more synthetically than the full records. The attributes thus generated were used to train a feedforward network in order to map them into what can be called higher level descriptors of each earthquake, such as the magnitude or the peak accelerations, for example. Once such mapping is obtained, one may infer a number of attributes that would allow the artificial generation of the accelerograms corresponding to ""expected earthquakes"" described resorting to those higher level descriptors"

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Full text: content.pdf (408,837 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2000 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.analysis (0.031791)
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Permission to reproduce these documents have been graciously provided by Icelandic Building Research Institute. The assistance of the editor, Mr. Gudni Gudnason, is gratefully appreciated


Chaisomphob T, Thitinant H, Puthikanon T, Kittakueng T, Viseshsin T

Geographical information system application to building maintenance:case study on maintenance of 13th asian games athlete village, thailand

Abstract: This paper is concerned with application of Geographic Information System (GIS) to buildingmaintenance of the 13th Asian Games Athlete Village at Thammasat University, Rangsit campus inThailand. The Athlete Village, which can accommodate 9,800 persons, is comprised of 23buildings. The application was done by using the abilities of graphic attachment and capability forstoring data of GIS. In addition, the Network Analyst Extension, which is one of the functions ofthe currently adopted program (ArcView GIS), was used to deal with the complex buildingnetworks such as pipeline system. Furthermore, some maintenance data were stored to provide asdatabase according to building maintenance management.

Keywords: Geographic Information System (GIS), Building Maintenance, NetworkAnalyst, Computer Aided Design (CAD) Drawing, Databases

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Series: ecce:2001 (browse)
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Cheng J,Deng Y,Du Q

Mapping between BIM models and 3d GIS city models of different levels of detail

Abstract: Modeling the built environment of a city digitally in three dimensions can support navigation, urban planning, disaster management, and energy consumption analysis. City Geography Markup Language (CityGML) was developed in recent years as a Geographic Information System (GIS) data standard to represent the geometry and geographical information of buildings in digital 3D city models. CityGML supports modeling on various Levels of Detail (LoDs) from simple box models to models with interior partitions. This paper presents the theoretical framework that we have developed for mapping between Building Information Modeling (BIM) models in the Industry Foundation Classes (IFC) format and CityGML models of different LoDs. The framework consists of two major parts – (1) transformation between BIM models and high level CityGML LoD4 models, and (2) harmonization among the four LoDs of CityGML. For the first part, a reference ontology was developed to transfer semantic information between BIM models in the IFC format and CityGML models. To reduce the file size of the generated CityGML models, a new geometric transformation algorithm was developed for the mapping from Swept Solid or Constructive Solid Geometry (CSG) representations, which are commonly used in BIM models, to Boundary Representation (BRep) which is used in CityGML models. For the second part, schema mediation techniques are used to convert CityGML models from one LoD to another LoD. Based on the reference ontology, an application domain extension (ADE) called “Semantic City Model (SCM)” was developed for CityGML. The SCM ADE enriches CityGML models by providing more semantic information such as the linkage relationship between walls and building stories. This paper presents the developed mapping framework with an illustrative example of a residential building.

Keywords: 3D city models,Building Information Modeling (BIM),Geographic Information System (GIS),Industry Foundation Classes (IFC),Schema mapping

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Series: convr:2013 (browse)
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Guss C

Virtual teams, project management processes and the construction industry

Abstract: Process is the "action of going through, a progressive forward movement from one point to another, with the goal of reaching an end point" 1. Project managers in the construction industry tend to regard process as the completion of separate technical tasks to reach an end. What project managers do not ask is, what happens in the process of communicating that contributes to a successful or poor project. The answer remains elusive because project managers expend energy finding better management tools and techniques, not communication processes to help expose and overcome limitations and inefficiencies of projects. Some tools provide a means to examine overall project success, but typically discrete time phases are examined in projects. Deming’s teachings are clear in that improvement in the quality of projects demand improvements in processes. One of the key process improvements that the construction industry needs to make is the area of communication to facilitate the transfer of knowledge between teams and projects. In the future, the industry will find it more difficult to rely on tacit knowledge (on the job know-how) of organizations or individuals in virtual environments.movement from one point to another, with the goal of reaching an end point” 1. Project managers in the construction industry tend to regard process as the completion of separate technical tasks to reach an end. What project managers do not ask is, what happens in the process of communicating that contributes to a successful or poor project. The answer remains elusive because project managers expend energy finding better management tools and techniques, not communication processes to help expose and overcome limitations and inefficiencies of projects. Some tools provide a means to examine overall project success, but typically discrete time phases are examined in projects. Deming’s teachings are clear in that improvement in the quality of projects demand improvements in processes. One of the key process improvements that the construction industry needs to make is the area of communication to facilitate the transfer of knowledge between teams and projects. In the future, the industry will find it more difficult to rely on tacit knowledge (on the job know-how) of organizations or individuals in virtual environments. Global trends to outsource work and downsize employee pools combined with the widespread availability of telecommunications devices continue to push organizations into considering ‘virtual employment’. Despite knowing that additional full-time employees often cause greater negative utility, the construction business continues to lag behind in use of communication technology and in the development of virtual teams. In the future, a shift to virtual teams will be a consequence of the need for high speed communication of new ideas among experts world-wide, for a competitive edge. Challenges are in using telecommunications tools to overcome geographic and psychological distance in managerial and technical communication. This paper discusses the future need for virtual teams in the construction industry. Some useful communication processes and technologies that facilitate a transition to virtual teams are introduced. These include: desktop videoconferencing, public video networks, Group Decision Support Systems, and the Internet. Advances in procurement capability is discussed to show impacts on the construction industry.

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Full text: content.pdf (60,477 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:1996 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.education (0.033332) class.communication (0.027279) class.social (0.025990)
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Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by the University of Ljubljana. The assistance of the editor, Prof. Ziga Turk, is gratefully appreciated.


Jiwen Zhang, Tim Taylor, Roy Sturgill, Gabe Dadi and Nikiforos Stamatiadis

Predictive Risk Modeling of Differential Bridge Settlement

Abstract: Differential settlement between the roadway pavement resting on embankment fill and the bridge abutment built on more rigid foundation often creates a bump when driving from roadway to bridge, and vice versa. This paper studies the problem at a macroscopic level by determining a method to predict the levels of approach settlement to assist designers in developing remediation plans during project development to minimize the lifecycle costs of bridge bump repairs. A macro method considering a combination of maintenance times, maintenance measures, and observed settlement was used to classify the differential settlement scale as minimal, moderate, and severe. A set of project characteristics including approach, abutment type, embankment, foundation, and traffic volume that may influence the formation of differential settlement were identified and used as parameters to develop a model to predict the settlement severity for a given approach. Logistic regression analyses were implemented to identify the relationships between the levels of differential settlement and the input variables for a sample of 600 randomly selected bridges in Kentucky. Geographic region, approach age, average daily traffic, and the use of approach slabs are identified as the four most predominant factors that can significantly affect the formation of differential settlement. Based on the performance of bridge approaches in Kentucky, how those parameters interacted in the prediction model is illustrated in the logistic regressions.

Keywords: Differential Settlement, Logistic Regression, Prediction Model

DOI: https://doi.org/10.24928/JC3-2017/0060

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Series: jc3:2017 (browse)
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Kang T-W,Hong C-H

The architecture development for the interoperability between BIM and GIS

Abstract: The purpose of this study is to propose a scalable architecture that can be supported via the BIM (Building Information Modeling) on a GIS (Geographic Information System) platform for information interoperability between various heterogeneous systems such as BIM, GIS, and FM (Facility Management). This platform requires the acquisition of information from various data sources such as IFC (Industry Foundation Classes) and DBMS (Database Management System) if a use case for facility management, energy management, and design evaluation needs to be implemented, followed by a transformation of the information into appropriate information that can represent the perspective suitable for the use case. IFC may be considered a method for information interoperability, but it has a limitation in representing information in the perspectives of the use cases. Unlike the support of information interoperability based on the existing IFC, we would like to approach the problem of GIS- and BIM-based information interoperability by separating the problem in terms of geometry and property information. The geometry information is transformed into a simplified surface model from the IFC geometry information for that visualization of a number of objects represented in the GIS. The information required for the use case perspective is extracted and transformed from the property information by utilizing ETL (Extraction, Transform, and Load). ETL is a technology that extracts, transforms, and loads information from a variety of data sources and has been used for OLAP (Online Analytical Processing) function implementation via data mining in the management engineering arena to represent perspective-oriented information. In this study, we have applied ETL from the perspective of BIM. For this purpose, we have reviewed the related study trends and derived a general use case of BIM on a GIS platform. Further, component architecture is designed to implement the use case as well as a Star Schema to represent information according to the perspective for the development of a data warehouse. On the basis of these, BGP architecture is proposed for implementing the ETL concept using BIM on a GIS platform. Furthermore, a use case for the facility management of Korea Institute of Construction Technology is implemented as a prototype to show the usefulness of the proposed architecture. Thus, in this study, we demonstrate that information required from the perspective of project stakeholders can be interoperated effectively.

Keywords: BIM,GIS,integration,interoperability,perspective representation,ETL

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Series: convr:2013 (browse)
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Nicola Moretti, Sebastiano Maltese, Mario Claudio Dejaco and Fulvio Re Cecconi

GIS Supporting Surveys for Urban Sustainability Assessment

Abstract: Urban Facility Management (UFM) is an effective framework to support management of the complexity of the city environment, to optimise resources, enhance quality and guarantee citizenÕs safety. Nevertheless, it can be observed a lack of standardised objective tools for urban quality assessment of existing neighbourhoods. In this paper, a procedure for urban sustainability assessment exploiting Geographic Information Systems (GIS), Database Management Systems (DBMS) and mobile devices is presented. A system called District Information Model (DIM) is employed for this purpose, in order to detect the anomalies and enable evaluation of urban componentsÕ average conservation status. The results of the survey supported the implementation of an UFM service in an Italian Neighbourhood, near Milan. UFM can be intended as a framework to pursuit urban sustainability objectives, in the wider context of Europe 2020 strategy. Thus, the process leading to urban sustainability reporting through the DIM has been investigated, through a case study research. In conclusion, the system can be seen as a risk prevention tool both for citizens and professionals working for management of built environment; and as a sustainability assessment tool compliant with most recognised Neighbourhood Sustainability Assessment (NSA) protocols.

Keywords: Urban Facility Management, Information Modelling, Neighbourhood Sustainability Assessment, District Survey and Management

DOI: https://doi.org/10.24928/JC3-2017/0116

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R Fosu, K Suprabhas, Z Rathore, C Cory

Integration of Building Information Modeling (BIM) and Geographic Information Systems (GIS) – a literature review and future needs

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Full text: content.pdf (152,749 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2015 (browse)
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Rodrigues A

Emergency warning and management in dam rupture using online mapping

Abstract: The work presented in this paper was developed in the context of a NATO Science for Stabilityproject (NATO PO FLOODRISK- Dam Break Flood Risk Management in Portugal) that aimed todevelop tools to improve the management of flood hazards in downstream valleys of dams. Theresults of the project were applied to the Arade Valley, in the south of Portugal.The tools developed by the project involved the following: the Daminfo system, which incorporateda database holding relevant information on Portuguese dams associated with geographic data; a setof dam break models, developed in the context of the case-study in order to identify and display arange of critical inundation areas; and DamAid, an emergency warning and management system fordam ruptures.This paper describes the design and development of DamAid. Its main purpose is to provideauthorities with enough information to produce decisions in real time, with a step-by-step reminderof the emergency plans' procedures, and with sufficiently robust tools to enable the gathering ofdecision-makers that are geographically apart. The system is based on existing plans' definitions andprocedures for emergencies that may occur in the Arade valley and includes the necessary (preemergency)information to aid decision-makers during the emergency period. It also includes anonline mapping application integrating the information developed to evaluate the situation duringthe several steps of the emergency plan.

Keywords: Emergency warning and flood management, Online mapping, Internet, geographicinformation system, land use management, inundation maps.

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Series: ecce:2001 (browse)
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Ru_diger SCHU_TZ, Thomas Bernoulli, Thomas Wießflecker, Ulrich Walder

A CONTEXT-ADAPTIVE BUILDING INFORMATION MODEL FOR REAL-TIME STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS IN A DISASTER MANAGEMENT SYSTEM

Abstract: In case of disasters in urban areas it is important to immediately gain precise information about the constructional environment in order to react appropriately. Information can be gathered from Computer Aided Facility Management (CAFM)-, Computer Aided Design (CAD)- and Geographic Information Systems (GIS)-Applications but their effectiveness depends on the preparation of the data for the special needs in extraordinary situations. A major challenge is the integration of real-time data from sensors in the building and from the equipment used by the rescue forces on site. At the Institute of Building Informatics a Computer Aided Disaster Management System (CADMS) is under development which is based on an enlarged ifcXML model. The system allows for the interaction of building data with static and mobile sensors, and can be used for indoor positioning of the rescue forces. A simplified, real-time adaptive static model will be used to estimate the danger of structural collapse. The rescue forces will be equipped with head-mounted displays (HMDs) and be able to interact with the application by voice. The tracking of the rescue forces is performed by inertial and magnetic sensors. These sensors are constantly calibrated according to the surrounding “intelligent” building data.

Keywords: building model, sensors, real-time structural analysis, indoor positioning, speech enabled user interface

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Full text: content.pdf (282,107 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2008 (browse)
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