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A Mohammadpour, I Alanqar, C Anumba, J Messner

Cross-Case Energy Simulation Modeling Analysis in Healthcare Facilities Retrofit

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Series: w78:2014 (browse)
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Atul Khanzode, Martin Fischer, Dean Reed

Challenges and benefits of implementing virtual design and construction technologies for coordination of mechanical, electrical, and plumbing systems on a large healthcare project

Abstract: This case study presents the challenges that the project team faced and the benefits they realized in imple-menting virtual design and construction technologies to coordinate the Mechanical, Electrical and Plumbing (MEP) systems on a $95M healthcare project in Northern California, USA. These challenges include creating a work structure for the MEP coordination process, organizing the project team consisting of designers, engineers, contractors, and subcontractors, determining the handoff of information between the team members, creating guidelines for the most efficient use of virtual design and construction technologies, creating the process of conflict identification and resolu-tion between the MEP subcontractors, and aligning the contractual interests of the coordination team to meet the over-all project schedule. We also discuss the benefits that the project team achieved by using the virtual design and construction tools for the coordination of the MEP systems. These benefits include labor savings ranging from 20 to 30 % for all the subcontrac-tors, 100% pre-fabrication for the plumbing contractor, only one recorded injury throughout the installation of MEP systems over a 250,000 square feet project area, less than 0.2% rework for the whole project for the mechanical sub-contractor, zero conflicts in the field installation of the systems and only a handful of requests for information for the coordination of the MEP systems. The overall benefits to the owner include about 6 months’ savings on the schedule and about $9M in cost for the overall project.

Keywords: virtual design and construction, conflict identification, menoMMechan eal, Electricalpand Plu systemsmbing

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Full text: content.pdf (1,574,195 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2007 (browse)
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Dunston, Phllip; McGlothlin, James; and Arns, Laura

An Immersive Virtual Reality Mock-Up For Design Review Of Hospital Patient Rooms

Abstract: Having identified a scarcity of evidence-based design principles and practices for patient-centered healthcare environments, researchers at the Purdue University Regenstrief Center for Healthcare Engineering have developed a Virtual reality (VR) mock-up of a hospital patient room to explore its efficacy for identifying how physical environment and design elements impact behavior, processes and safety. The VR patient room mock-up is designed to have a high degree of interactivity to facilitate evaluation of the designed space as a “healing environment.” Positive feedback from healthcare practitioners regarding the mockup has motivated the Investigators to leverage their experience to create VR mock-ups for other hospital units and venues.

Keywords: CAVE, mock-up, design review, patient room, patient-centered design

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Full text: content.pdf (328,040 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: convr:2007 (browse)
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Hazlehurst G, Pitt T, Buxton R

Implementation of single building modelling technologies into themanagement phase of the property cycle

Abstract: This paper brings together work carried out by Guy Hazlehurst, Stephen Drewer and RodenBuxton at the University of the West of England on the concept of the Single Building Model andresearch by Terry Pitt and George Griffith on the management of complex healthcare facilities,'Healthcare FM'. The central aim of the research has been to utilise advanced 3D, object modelsof complex buildings not only as repositories for 3D, 2D graphics, data and intelligence, but to actas 'information brokers'. The concept of the single building model has effectively evolved toprovide a spatial database that has the inherent potential to act as the spine of a 'heterogeneous'system. This spine links the sub-systems that enable complex processes throughout the life of thebuilding to be modelled.This paper will seek to address the issues of systems integration, through the creation andapplication of Single Building Modelling technologies, during the post occupancy stage of thebuilding process. Modelling complex buildings and estates at a time long after the facilities wereoriginally conceived, designed and built posits a set of unique issues that do not arguably arisewhen such models evolve through the incremental processes of inception, design and construction.It will be argued that the principal issues are those of data compatibility and the level of detailrequired within the 'ex-post' single building model to deliver optimum benefit to the owners andmanagers of complex buildings. The research issues identified by the production andimplementation of such a model within a Hospital's existing building management will bediscussed. Although the example cited in this paper is a healthcare building the points raisedwithin it arguably apply to any significant property or estate.

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Full text: content.pdf (155,600 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:1997 (browse)
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J Lucas, T Bulbul, W Thabet

A LIFECYCLE FRAMEWORK FOR USING BIM IN HEALTHCARE FACILITY MANAGEMENT

Abstract: Facility Management (FM) is important for healthcare environments to provide adequate and safe treatment to patients by maintaining the physical environment. FM activities are challenged by being disconnected from other processes within a facility’s lifecycle. Within healthcare, this disconnect is compounded by insufficient communication with clinical personnel about concurrent clinical operations. Insufficient communication can lead to added risk to patient safety and additional cost to healthcare procedures. This paper describes research on identifying the information across the facility lifecycle and within the facility management and operation stage that are needed to support FM activities in healthcare environments. This information will be used to develop an ontology of integrated FM and clinical information for improving the quality of care in a healthcare setting. The ontology will be linked to a BIM. The ontology will ensure that needed information for facility operations is recorded throughout the lifecycle of the facility and allow facility managers quick access to better organized information. Focus will be on giving an overview of the methods used for determining information needs for FM activities through case study analysis. Case studies are identified through interviews with FM and clinical personnel as well as through literature review. Select cases are documented with Business Process Model Notation (BPMN) allowing for separation of steps and actors within each case. Information needs for each of the steps is determined and overlaid onto the BPMN diagrams. Lastly, the source of each information types is determined. Future work will take the information types, and their origins, determined through this analysis and apply it to an ontology. The ontology will support a BIM-based system for capturing information throughout the lifecycle of the facility in support of the operation and maintenance of the facility.

Keywords: Facility Management, Healthcare, Building Information Modelling, Ontology

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Full text: content.pdf (857,932 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2011 (browse)
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Masi Mohammadi, Peter Erkelens

Old and at Home in an Intelligent Environment

Abstract: Due to the rapid aging of the Dutch population and aging-in-place policies, an increasing demand for suitable dwellings is to be expected. A significant contribution can be provided by domotics defined as: the advanced technological equipments and services in the domestic environment to sustain and to enhance the quality of aging in place as well as empowerment of the senior citizen (in daily life). This paper, based on literature review and qualitative and quantitative studies, (i) seeks to inform the development of domotics technology in the living environment of the older adults; (ii) provides an overview of the multiplicity of needs and attitudes of the older citizens regarding smart technology in the domestic environment; and (iii) develops recommendations to incorporate domotics in the architectural structure of the dwelling. Study to senior citizens’ needs and attitudes toward domotics is based on triangulation of cohort-group discussions, enabling techniques and in-depth interviews followed by a postal questionnaire survey. Hence, based on the identified needs, two houses, occupied by the elderly, have been upgraded by domotics. The findings indicate that needs, perceptions, environmental and personal attributes of the senior determine the attitudes towards automation. This attitude can best be described as ‘critical/positive’. Too much automation is undesirable. Ethical considerations are particularly related to professional stakeholders, especially caregivers, whereas seniors are mainly interested in the functionality of domotics. In the elderly housing, the stage of stand-alone devices is outdated. It should be focused on the networked home and the integration of domotics in the house. Innovation by addition in a traditional construction environment often results in sub-optimal solutions. The results confirm that the integration of intelligent technology in a house needs to be a synthesis of the user’s needs, technology, the living environment and healthcare.

Keywords: aging in place, domotics, attitude, residential needs, senior citizens, case study

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Full text: content.pdf (251,289 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2010 (browse)
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R Decorme, E Leang, E Nykanen, J Hakala, Pedro Martin, B Tellado, S Erice Oronoz, O Leyun Perez, H Timmerman, H Schepers

Greening the healthcare sector: 4 hospitals demonstrating advanced controls for lighting and HVAC

Abstract: In the complex environment of a hospital, Heating, Ventilating, Air-Conditioning (HVAC) and Lighting account for nearly 80% of all energy use. The potential savings achievable with investments with a payback time less than seven years can reach up 40% depending on the current condition of the hospital, where HVAC and lighting are the major contributors. Half of it, being 20%, can be attributed to the impact of ICT.The HosPilot project aims to support the decision makers with an integrated approach which helps drastically reduce the energy consumption of newly built hospitals and existing hospitals being refurbished, increasing well being and comfort. The main objective of the project is to develop a methodology that will be able to provide a hardware description for an energy efficient system for any hospital, based on specific requirements of that hospital. This methodology will be proven by creating pilot sites in the partner hospitals, and by monitoring those pilots during one year. In addition, it will be ensured that this HosPilot methodology is applicable everywhere in Europe. This paper elaborates on the developed methodology and the advanced ICTs demonstrated in the pilot buildings in The Netherlands, Spain, Finland, and France.HosPilot is a project focused on energy efficiency in hospitals. It is co-funded by the EC (contract no. 238933) and involves 11 partners in 5 European countries. The project belongs to the ICT Policy Support Programme. It has started in March 2009 and will end in February 2012.

Keywords: energy efficient hospitals, smart lighting, HVAC automation, monitoring

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Full text: content.pdf (261,826 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2011 (browse)
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Robert Amor

A BETTER BIM: IDEAS FROM OTHER INDUSTRIES

Abstract: The architecture, engineering, construction and facility management (A/E/C-FM) industries have the opportunity to interoperate with software tools which utilise the IFC standard building information model (BIM). However, within the companies and projects which are currently using this standard there have been a number of issues raised with an impact on achievable interoperability. At the time that the IFC specifiers look at approaches to address these interoperability issues it is worth looking at other industries, who also have complex models and high reliability requirements, to see how whether there are lessons which can be learnt. In this paper the healthcare and manufacturing domains are surveyed in regards to their interoperability, conformance and certification approaches and novel ideas from these industries are presented for consideration of the A/E/C-FM industries and the developers of the IFC. A number of these approaches would argue for a restructuring of responsibilities between standards setting and certification, and others propose further development of freely available resources for all in the industry.

Keywords: BIM; Interoperability; Survey

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Full text: content.pdf (174,117 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2008 (browse)
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Vasiliki Kondyli, Mehul Bhatt and Timo Hartmann

Towards People-Centred Precedents for Parametric Design: The Case of Wayfinding in Large-Scale Public Buildings

Abstract: Large-scale public buildings need to ensure an effective wayfinding performance for different user groups. Recent precedent based design approaches take spatial cognition into account by analysing the visuo-locomotive experience of users with the aim to interpret their behaviour and integrate it into a people-centred design. The paper focuses on the process from the analysis of precedents and the visuo-locomotive experience to the definition of design constraints that can be embedded into a parametric design for wayfinding. Primarily, we pursue a qualitative analysis of the visuo-locomotive experience of wayfinders in a healthcare built environment, with the use of cognitive-assistive and immersive/ virtual reality technologies. The outcome, presented through immersive reality, is correlated with the morphological analysis of the space and leads to precedents evaluation about design for wayfinding and the definition of new design constraints. The process is approached through an example, the environmental aspect of visual range. We conclude that this practice can overcome some of the experience based design practices of today but is not yet ingrained in the architectural and engineering design processes of public buildings.

Keywords: Precedent Based Design, Immersive Reality, Spatial Cognition, Wayfinding, People-Centred Parametric Design

DOI: https://doi.org/10.24928/JC3-2017/0205

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