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Futcher K, Rowlinson S

A new model for the management of portfolios of projects

Abstract: This paper addresses the issue of implementing a MIS which is able to identify significant projects and provide feedback for their control. These significant projects are those which have most impact on the overall performance of the portfolio of projects. The key issues which are addressed are the performance of a MIS based on traditional principles and the subsequent search for heuristics which would make this system effective and efficient.

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Full text: content.pdf (68,172 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:1996 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.environment (0.049606) class.impact (0.048306) class.economic (0.034925)
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Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by the University of Ljubljana. The assistance of the editor, Prof. Ziga Turk, is gratefully appreciated.


G J Brewer, T Gajendran & S E Chen

The use of ICT in the construction industry: critical success factors and strategic relationships in temporary project organisations

Abstract: This paper describes the application of a previously developed model of critical success factors for ICT-mediated chains to three construction project supply chains. These cases drew on the experiences of key stakeholder organisations within each in order to firstly, identify the extent to which features of a previously developed, generalised model of ICT success factors were present in each case, and secondly to extend the model in respect of those aspects relating to pre-existing relationships, strategic relationship formation, and the expectation of a continuing business relationship into the future. The paper is structured to describe the protocols and analysis used, and to report a summary of the findings across the three cases.

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Full text: content.pdf (205,231 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2005 (browse)
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Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by the Technische Universität Dresden.


G. Brewer, T. Gajendran & C. Beard

Influences on the adoption of BPM/BIM: an Australian perspective

Abstract: BPM/BIM offer the possibility of faster, more accurate collaborative working thereby offering a solution to many current construction industry challenges, yet their usage remains frustratingly limited. It follows that there are likely be a number of influences and the aim of this research was therefore to identify those that could be considered relevant to the Australian construction industry. It first modeled candidate inhibitors identified from the literature, applying this to a single ‘critical case’ study project. Interviews undertaken with six key stakeholders were triangulated with two industry experts. Coding and abstraction of the data largely confirmed the efficacy of the model, which was subsequently found to be congruent with Brewer’s model of Innovation & Attitude (Brewer 2008) after qualitative meta-analysis was conducted.

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Full text: content.pdf (234,106 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2009 (browse)
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Georgios Hadjidemetriou and Symeon E. Christodoulou

Pavement Anomalies Detection and Classification Using Entropic Texture Segmentation and Support Vector Machines

Abstract: Presented herein is a vision-based method for the detection of anomalies on roadway pavements, utilizing low-cost video acquisition and image processing of road surface frames collected by a smartphone (or camera) located on a vehicle moving in a real-life urban network, along with entropy-based texture segmentation filters, and support vector machine (SVM) classification. The proposed system, which has been developed in MATLAB, pre-processes video streams for the identification of video frames of changes in image-entropy values, isolates these frames and performs texture segmentation to identify pixel areas of significant changes in entropy values, and then classifies and quantifies these areas using SVMs. The developed SVM is trained and tested by feature vectors generated from the histogram and two texture descriptors of non-overlapped square blocks, which constitute images that includes ÔÔpatchÕÕ and ÔÔno-patchÕÕ areas. The outcome is composed of block-based and image-based classification, as well as measurement of the patch area.

Keywords: Pavement Condition Evaluation, Road Anomaly Detection, Vision-Based, Entropy, Texture Segmentation

DOI: https://doi.org/10.24928/JC3-2017/0191

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Series: jc3:2017 (browse)
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Goh Bee Hua, Chu Yee Leen

Developing national standards for the classification of construction information in Singapore

Abstract: Despite lagging far behind countries which have started developing construction information classification systems over the last 30 to 50 years, Singapore is fast catching up in this area of development via the formation of the Construction Industry IT Standards Technical Committee (CITC) in 1998. The Government's intention is to create Singapore into a business and IT hub, and the National IT Standards Committee (NITSC) was formed in 1990 to spearhead the development of national IT standards in all sectors of the economy. To date, the CITC has initiated and established standards in the areas of CAD, cost and resources information, and specification. The paper discusses the developmental process for one published standard, the Singapore Standard Code of Practice for Classification of Construction Cost Information (SS CP 80: 1999), and one standard which is in preparation, the Proposed Singapore Standard Code of Practice for Classification of Construction Resources Information. The intention is to share the Singapore experience with countries which are embarking on a similar programme. The next challenge for CITC is to manage change and promote widespread adoption of these standards by the industry. Results from the questionnaire survey and interviews indicate a positive attitude towards standards development but less positive towards full adoption. Lack of incentives, little immediate benefits, cost to be incurred from re-classifying historical data and cross-disciplinary differences are some of the findings. The key pointers for intended standard developers are: make a conscious effort of involving industry players in the development of the standards in order to help bring down barriers to change; adopt a two-pronged approach so as to achieve a win-win-win result; identify leaders in the industry who can drive the developed standard/technology in order to convince other players to follow suit; and develop assistance schemes to help small firms embrace standardisation and IT.

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Full text: content.pdf (75,350 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2002 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.economic (0.030731) class.synthesis (0.018880) class.impact (0.014794)
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Permission to reproduce these documents have been graciously provided by the Aarhus School of Architecture, Denmark. The assistnace of the editor, Prof. Kristian Agger, is gratefully aprecciated.


Gokcen Yilmaz, Asli Akcamete-Gungor and Onur Demirors

A Review on Capability and Maturity Models of Building Information Modelling

Abstract: Process assessment and maturity models in software engineering are widely used for process improvement. Likewise, assessing BIM capability and maturity have important effects on increasing BIM performance and enhancing benefits of BIM usage. Thus, there are various BIM capability and maturity models in the literature which are important for users to be able to select appropriate model for their BIM assessment purposes. This study aims to identify and analyse BIM capability and maturity models in the construction industry by doing a systematic literature review. As a result of this review, a total of 189 articles are investigated and 84 of them are found to be relevant. The identified methods are compared based on their purposes and components and the findings are presented in a comparison table. Additionally, widely used capability and maturity models in software engineering are identified and these models are compared with BIM capability and maturity models in terms of their structures. This comparison will be utilized for development of a process based BIM capability assessment model.

Keywords: Capability Maturity Model, Building Information Modelling, Process Assessment, Construction

DOI: https://doi.org/10.24928/JC3-2017/0309

Full text: content.pdf (537,040 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: jc3:2017 (browse)
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Grazina J,Cachadinha N

Towards a systematic production progress assessment based on AR on BIM – prerequisites and functional requirements

Abstract: Many studies on augmented reality (AR) have showed that its usage in Architecture, Engineering and Construction (AEC) sector is beneficial. Nowadays AR technology is growing rapidly, and the AEC sector can only benefit from it. Implementing AR upon Building Information Models (BIM) opens perspectives for new techniques and systems to manage onsite production. Measuring activities progress on a worksite is a time consuming process, and sometimes subject to inaccuracy. This may cause delays and cost overrun. Inaccuracy is mainly due to the lack of a standardized method to measure progress, which is usually done by each stakeholder according to his own customary method. Aiming at expediting and improving the reliability of the onsite production progress measurement, this study presents a conceptual model to measure activities progress and perform schedule updating using AR applied to BIM. For this purpose, the systems structure and design methodology (SSADM) was used to gather all the basic operations from similar systems, identify and eliminate the existing gaps, and add new operations. The concept proposed is based on a 5D (3D + schedule + cost) BIM model, which includes the activities planning, linked to the line items from the bill of quantities (BOQ). By superimposing the 5D model with reality onsite, it is possible to measure the activities progress and the cost up-to-date, through a physical comparison of as-built with as-planned. Deviations from the as-planned (both positive and negative) are detected by the system, which then automatically adjusts the planning according to the real worksite situation. This system reduces measurement errors and keeps the activities plan and costs updated. Measuring all kind of operations using AR onsite is seen as future perspectives.

Keywords: Building Information Modelling,Augmented Reality,Progress Measurement,Planning Production

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Full text: content.pdf (675,690 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: convr:2013 (browse)
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Guillermo Aranda-Mena, John Crawford, Agustin Chevez, Thomas Froese

BUILDING INFORMATION MODELLING DEMYSTIFIED: DOES IT MAKE BUSINESS SENSE TO ADOPT BIM?

Abstract: Building Information Modeling (BIM) offers a revolutionising way to design, document and procure buildings. BIM promises to become a new international benchmark for building design and documentation across industry on the basis of improved efficiencies and collaboration capabilities. However, BIM requires rethinking current practices and process thus it calls for a paradigm shift in the way we procure, design and operate buildings. There seems no question that BIM methodologies are to become the norm in the long term but more factual evidence is required today to provide guidance to industry. This paper investigates current business drivers for BIM adoption by architecture and building engineering consultants.BIM needs to compete against well-ingrained methods to deliver projects in a fragmented and rather traditional industry. This paper investigates 47 value propositions for the adoption of BIM under a multiple case study investigation carried out in Australia and Hong Kong (Aranda-Mena et. al 2008). The selected case study projects included a range of public (1) and private (4) sector building developments of small and large scale. Findings were coded, interpreted and synthesised in order to identify the challenges and business drivers, and the paper focuses mainly on challenges and benefits for architectural and engineering consultants, contractors and steel fabricators. As a condition for the selection criteria all case studies had to be collaborating by sharing BIM data between two or more consultants / stakeholders. As practices cannot afford to ignore BIM this paper aims to identify those immediate business drivers as to provoke debate amongst the professional and academic community.

Keywords: BIM

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Full text: content.pdf (175,163 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2008 (browse)
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Gul, Leman; Gu, Ning; and Williams, Anthony

A New Approach to Design Education: Evaluations of 3D Virtual Worlds on Design Teaching and Learning

Abstract: With the recent developments in information and communication technologies, 3D virtual worlds have the potential to make a major contribution to design education as constructivist learning environments. Considering the changing trend in design education, we have been employing cutting-edge technologies in our design teaching, allowing students to collaborate within the 3D virtual environments such as Second Life (www.secondlife.com) and Active Worlds (www.activeworlds.com), which support synchronized design communication and real-time 3D modeling. This paper reports our teaching experience and the students’ learning experience, based on team-based design and communication skills-building in 3D virtual environments and presents the challenges faced by design education. In this paper, we will firstly provide a critical analysis of various design learning and teaching features in 3D virtual environments as constructivist learning environments, and secondly identify issues which address the core skills and cognitive processes involved when designing in 3D virtual environments.

Keywords: 3D virtual worlds, design teaching and learning, affordances and constraints

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Full text: content.pdf (260,145 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: convr:2007 (browse)
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Haksever A M

A model to predict the occurrence of information overload of project managers

Abstract: "This paper investigates information overload of construction project managers. The aim is to identify its occurrence pattern and predict the occurrence probabilities in a given circumstance, as a project manager’s information load is inconstant in nature, fluctuating over time, changing character and source. First, a conceptual definition of information overload is developed, using time as the criterion to describe information load. Information overload for a project manager is taken as occurring when the demands on information processing time exceed the supply of time. Second, the variation of information load throughout the project is structured using the interaction of a project manager with project members through the stages of a project. These two elements are combined in a matrix format where values for information overload are ascribed to cells representing the interaction with each member during each stage of the project. Six key project members, and four project stages are defined. To allow the subjective quantification of information overload, five practical situations of real life information overload are described, of which one must be chosen for each of the twenty four stage-member cells. To test the model and calculate the probabilities of information overload, data were collected using a questionnaire survey of 140 project managers in the UK. Respondents were asked to select the relevant situation for each cell in the matrix. The resulting matrices had a weighting system applied and a mean calculated for each circumstance to create an Information Load Point (ILP), presented in an Information Load Matrix (ILM). The application of ‘Ordinal Logistic Regression’ into the ILP scores provides a predictive outcome, which gives the probabilities of a project manager being in any of the predetermined five information overload situations at any stage with any member. The detailed account of the calculations and the outcome of the analysis are presented. The results revealed that the extent and sources of information overload of construction project managers vary throughout the stages of a project. The construction stage has the highest probability of information overload, followed by the design stage. The main sources of information overload are the project participants contributing the key expertise in each stage. In the design stage, the key contributors are architects and consultants, and in the construction stage, contractors and sub-contractors. Architects’ and consultants’ contributions to information overload show a similar pattern through the project duration, as do those of contractors and sub-contractors. This is the first of its kind in construction project management and provides an invaluable source of reference and guidance on the probabilities of the occurrence of information overload in a construction project. The model predicts the situations where information overload is high, moderate, low or non-existent. It is then possible to concentrate on those overloaded areas by using the appropriate means or strategies."

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Full text: content.pdf (393,534 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2000 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.strategies (0.016354) class.man-software (0.013484) class.impact (0.012353)
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Permission to reproduce these documents have been graciously provided by Icelandic Building Research Institute. The assistance of the editor, Mr. Gudni Gudnason, is gratefully appreciated


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