Welcome
Digital library of construction informatics
and information technology in civil engineering and construction
 

Works 

Search Results

Facilitated by the SciX project

Hits 1 to 10 of 83

A Magdic & D Rebolj

Human oriented mobile system for on-site problem solving

Abstract: Uncertainties and the dynamic nature of on-site activities require complex coordination of information, resources and tasks. Problems caused by unanticipated events must be solved concurrently and should avoid project delays and costs increasing. For effective solving of such problems, the immediate availability of information and a prompt response of project participants on various levels of project organization are crucial. A combination of both conditions facilitate the optimum decision-making in cases of unanticipated events. Based on experiences from a series of experimental projects called E-site, it is our strong belief that a large amount of potentials for on-site problem solving lies in the knowledge, experience and capability of the site staff themself. Therefore, there is also a need to effectively link together the rich knowledge and experience of site staff and include site staff into problem solving processes. This paper describes a human oriented on-site problem solving system supported with context-aware communication to help dealing with unanticipated events on construction sites.

Keywords:

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf (229,036 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2005 (browse)
Cluster:
Class:
Similar papers:
Sound: N/A.

Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by the Technische Universität Dresden.


A Mediavilla, A Romero, J Pérez,F J Mata

Energy efficiency assessment in urban environments using GIS

Abstract: Energy simulation tools are commonly used in building design processes. Their calculation methods are comprehensive and widely accepted. However, the increasing requirements imposed to comply with low emission urban scenarios demand a wider scope analysis, taking into account not only the building, but also the interactions between urban elements (buildings, green areas, urban lighting…). GIS technology seems suitable for this purpose, but current solutions do not include deep energy demand calculations. On the other hand, building simulation tools do not consider the city environment and terrain influence. To evaluate a district by manually adding single building simulations results is an overwhelming process, prone to errors and very time-consuming.In this scenario, urban planners demand Decision Support Systems that go beyond traditional building-scope simulation engines and consider both building and urban-level variables in order to assess the energy efficiency of the urban design.Aware of this issue, the platform presented in this paper fills this gap between building and city approaches. It consists of an ArcGIS customisation, implementing energy simulation models for radiation, energy demands, consumption, energy costs and CO2 emissions. The results are simulated and visualized at different levels (façades, buildings and city). Thus, it is possible to benchmark the district against a reference scenario and certify the sustainability of a district. It has been validated with a new urban development scenario in northern Spain.The platform seamlessly integrates CAD cartography, GIS geoprocessing and the calculation strength of excel sheets, enhanced with 3D energy mapping outputs which can be seen in Google Earth. It does not require deep technical knowledge, being suited for multicriteria analysis. Its modularity allows extending it with future extensions.

Keywords: GIS, energy efficiency, low carbon cities, urban planning, simulation

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf (228,375 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2011 (browse)
Cluster:
Class:
Similar papers:
Sound: N/A.


A. Ahmed, J. Ploennigs, Y. Gao & K. Menzel

Analyse building performance data for energy-efficient building operation

Abstract: Modern buildings will contain an increasing number of wireless sensors and meters to monitor the building performance. This data allows improved analysis of building performance to increase the energyefficiency along with user comfort. This paper presents two approaches to analyse building performance data. One solution uses data warehouse techniques to create sophisticated energy consumption aggregations. A second approach implements data mining techniques to estimate the thermal comfort of occupants with a reduced number of sensors. This paper interprets the knowledge gained using, as an example, University College Cork’s building of the Environmental Research Institute to demonstrate the feasibility of this approach.

Keywords:

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf (1,507,477 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2009 (browse)
Cluster:
Class:
Similar papers:
Sound: N/A.


Ahmed V, Mahdjoubi L, Feng X, Leach M

The learning of CAD for construction: technical abilities or visual?

Abstract: The increasing demands of the construction industry for individuals with good IT skills add continuous pressures on higher education to improve their methods of teaching. CAD training, as an important part of IT training for construction students, is becoming an essential part of the curriculum in most built environment schools. However, general CAD training is mostly concerned with providing students with technical skills rather than the initial ability of spatial visualisation. Indeed, existing training methods of CAD applications, do not take into consideration students? learning styles, and the differences in their spatial visualisation abilities. Considering that CAD students need to perform various activities within CAD applications to develop an understanding of building concepts and components, their spatial visualisation abilities and their learning style, remain the main barriers. This paper identifies the learning strategies required to assist with the learning of 3D modelling and describes a new approach adopted to examine students' Special Visualisation Skills. The paper also describes innovative e-learning approaches developed to reinforce students' learning of 3D CAD, tracking their progress and highlighting qualitative measures of their effectiveness.

Keywords: 3D modelling, e-learning in construction, CAL, CAA

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf (595,899 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: itaec:2004 (browse)
Cluster:
Class:
Similar papers:
Sound: N/A.


Al-Hajj A, Aouad G

The development of an integrated life cycle costing model using object oriented and vr technologies

Abstract: There is an increasing realisation of the importance of operation and maintenance as opposed to capital costs throughout the life of an asset. In addition, new styles of contracts such as PFI (Private Finance Initiative) are becoming more popular. This will require that the building product is addressed within its holistic picture including the design, construction and maintenance. It is therefore vital to embed the life cycle costing element of a facility within its design and construction. Whole Life Costing is a technique used to facilitate effective choice between alternatives in the search of economic solutions. Information technology, particularly integrated databases and VR (Virtual Reality), can provide the mechanism to facilitate the integration of the whole life cost information. The research project described in this paper aims to add a life cycle costing element to the design phase of the OSCON integrated database developed at Salford University in the UK. The current integrated database within OSCON supports the functions of design, estimating and planning. The proposed system will allow the user within a VR environment to navigate inside the building retrieving information about building components that need replacement or repair. A colouring mechanism will be developed to show various elements in different colours according to cost criteria. This would allow the user to easily inspect the building and get rough ideas of repair and maintenance programmes, running costs and cash flows. The system will allow data to be updated continuously so that it will enable the comparison with initial plans and estimates and provides a fresh view of future action and feedback.

Keywords:

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf (77,170 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:1999 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.economic (0.029049) class.processing (0.019301) class.software development (0.013495)
Similar papers:
Sound: read aloud.

Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by the Research Press of the National Research Council of Canada. The support of the editors, particularly Dr. Dana Vanier, is gratefully appreciated.


Allweyer T, Babin-Ebell T, Leinenbach S, Scheer A W

Model-based re-engineering in the European construction industry

Abstract: Due to increasing competition, the European construction industry is forced to improve their business processes and support them with integrated information systems. Approaches for Business Process Re-engineering (BPR) from stationary industries need to be adapted to the specific requirements of the construction industry. For being successful, BPR requires the use of powerful methods, tools and procedures. The Architecture of Integrated Information Systems (ARIS) is presented as a framework for BPR, integrating business aspects with IT development. BPR projects can be improved by the use of pre-defined industry-specific reference models. The application of the ARIS framework to the construction industry is currently demonstrated in the European research project CORE (Construction Companies Processes Re-engineering). The CORE approach and its results are demonstrated with examples from project planning and management.

Keywords:

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf (85,237 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:1996 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.commerce (0.030342) class.strategies (0.022992) class.impact (0.015474)
Similar papers:
Sound: read aloud.

Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by the University of Ljubljana. The assistance of the editor, Prof. Ziga Turk, is gratefully appreciated.


Alvise Simondetti

Designer’s toolkit 2020: a vision for the practice

Abstract: Designer’s toolkit is rapidly changing and design practices need a shared vision of what the short, me-dium and long term might be. With this in mind we interviewed twenty-four thought leaders in the design community worldwide. Four big ideas emerged from the interviews: transferring technologies from other industries has provided great bene-fits, but it has also generated the need to transfer processes; changes in the way we build drives changes in the de-signer’s desktop, including the representations that designers use to communicate; greater gains are achieved by focus-sing on the interplay of specialised algorithms; “just on time” design data improves design. Four possible contexts for the designer’s toolkit are described: the proprietor aimed at increasing productivity, the open-source aimed at increasing IT driven creativity, either more or less engaged with fabrication. Finally, the paper concludes by proposing what designers ought to be doing today. Actions include educating specialist toolmakers, custodian and math modellers; integrating computer controlled machine workshops into designers’ project spaces; the automation of repetitive design tasks; supporting communities around software tools and store project data according to geospatial co-ordinates.

Keywords: Design community, technology transfer, process transfer, designer's desktop, representation, communication

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf (451,568 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2007 (browse)
Cluster:
Class:
Similar papers:
Sound: N/A.


Appelqvist I, Keijer U

Building integrity a prototype for an it support system

Abstract: The industrialization of the building industry requires a profound understanding of the interactions between building parts, elements, spaces and systems. The industrialization also causes an increasing number of actors and suppliers to be involved in the building process. The problems concerning interactions are not limited to technical issues. The organization of the process, as well as responsibilities and liabilities of consultants, subcontractors and other actors of the process contribute to the growing implications that constitute the problem in its whole. Neglecting the interaction problems could affect what has been called the Building Integrity problem, BI. The first part of the research has been concentrated to formulate the problem and the key questions to be answered. A conceptual schema describing the BI problem tentatively has been outlined. The schema includes some interesting classifying attributes, e.g. the functions of a building, building parts, spaces, actors and the causes of building defects. A so called "defect model" has been chosen as a base for an IT Support System. The system aims at supporting certain actors to detect BI problems in the building process. A prototype system is currently developed and is described.

Keywords:

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf (1,206,229 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:1995 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.man-software (0.029112) class.social (0.016984) class.represent (0.013808)
Similar papers:
Sound: read aloud.

Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by the Stanford University, USA. The support of the editors, particularly Prof. Fischer is gratefully appreciated.


Appelqvist I, Keiljer U

Building integrity - interactions between building parts, systems and the actors of the building process

Abstract: Many of the problems concerning poor effectivity, low quality and increased cost in the building process pertain to the area of interaction between building parts, elements, spaces and systems. The industrialisation of the building industry requires a more profound understanding of these interactions. An increasing number of actors and suppliers are involved in the building process which implies interactions related to the organisation of the process. Thus, the interaction problems do not confine themselves to physical parts and technical issues. The organisation of the process, responsibilities and liabilities of consultants, subcontractors and other actors contribute to the growing implications of the variety of interactions that constitute the problem in its whole. An analysis of the general problem, which has been addressed as Building Integrity, BI, has commenced From a systems design point of view, BI is related to the ongoing research on building modelling, which is discussed briefly.

Keywords:

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf (1,870,258 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:1994 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.man-software (0.041949) class.social (0.017435) class.analysis (0.010768)
Similar papers:
Sound: read aloud.

Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by VTT, Espoo, Finland.


Avani Goyal, Ahmet Kilinc, Minkyung Kang and Burcu Akinci

Energy Efficient Improvements to the Envelope of Low-Income Housing: A Case Study of Habitat for Humanity Homes

Abstract: Low-income families pay substantial portions of their total expenditure on household energy bills, making them vulnerable to rising energy costs. Habitat for Humanity houses are built for low-income families and made affordable with volunteer work and construction material donations. Hence, the trade-off between the homesÕ initial construction costs and their life-time energy costs must be evaluated carefully. This paper targets to support better-informed decisions that balance the affordability of certain construction materials with their potential for energy efficiency. In collaboration with Habitat for Humanity of Westchester, we created an energy simulation model of an existing low-income house and calculated the homeÕs annual energy usage with different design alternatives for windows and walls. The resulting estimated annual energy savings are then evaluated alongside their initial investment costs, which were retrieved from RS Means standard construction cost data and quotations from industry. The results show that it is possible to reduce the energy cost of these houses without significantly increasing the construction costs through exploration of different wall and window options. While specific enclosure suggestions apply to this case-study, the utilized approach on exploring different options to identify opportunities to save energy can be used to understand impact on the lives of low-income families.

Keywords: Low-Income Housing, Energy Efficiency, Cost Analysis, Residential Housing, Habitat for Humanity

DOI: https://doi.org/10.24928/JC3-2017/0067

Full text: content.pdf (994,077 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: jc3:2017 (browse)
Cluster:
Class:
Similar papers:
Sound: N/A.


For more results click below:

 

hosted by University of Ljubljana



includes

W78




© itc.scix.net 2003
this is page 1 show page 2 show page 3 show page 4 show page 5 show page 6 ... show page 9 Home page of this database login Powered by SciX Open Publishing Services 1.002 February 16, 2003