Welcome
Digital library of construction informatics
and information technology in civil engineering and construction
 

Works 

Search Results

Facilitated by the SciX project

Hits 11 to 20 of 37

Faraj I, Alshwai M

A Modularised Integrated Computer Environment for the Construction Industry: SPACE

Abstract: This paper outlines an overview of the SPACE project. SPACE (Simultaneous Prototyping for an Integrated Construction Environment) is a rapid prototyping environment which supports a subset of a construction project life cycle. Its main objective is to develop a future intelligent integrated design and construction system for the civil and building domain through which a number of solutions can be generated and analyzed. This is accomplished through the use of a comprehensive project data model capable of supporting a range of applications. The data model consists of an independent data model and application specific data models. The research concentrates on establishing a project data infrastructure and tools for managing the information exchange that occurs during a project life cycle, with emphasis on the design, site layout and construction planning, cost estimating and maintenance applications. This will enable better, more efficient and more cost effective buildings to be designed. The output generated by the prototype are very detailed which can improve the decision making process, different constraints can be applied and their consequences can be simulated. The prototype was tested with a number of case studies, some of which can be viewed by downloading the demo file attached with this paper.

Keywords: Computer Integrated Construction, Project Model, Integration

DOI:

Full text: http://www.itcon.org/1999/3 (available to registered users only)

Series: itcon:1999 (browse)
Cluster:
Class:
Similar papers:
Sound: read aloud.


Gurevich U,Sacks R

Integrated virtual reality and discrete event simulation methods for production system research in construction

Abstract: Researching the behavior of production systems in construction is challenging because outcomes depend not only on production system design and on control strategies, but also on the decision-making behavior of works managers, crew leaders and suppliers. People make decisions within their context, and with limited and often uncertain information. This is especially true in the case of construction projects, where production is dependent on close coordination between multiple independent subcontractors. Theoretical models of the systems are limited if they ignore the human element, or if they assume rationality in decision-making. Thus experimental setups designed to test proposed production control systems or strategies should incorporate live experiments with human subjects. Virtual reality (VR) environments linked with discrete-event simulations (DES) provide an excellent platform for this kind of experimental setup. They enable, for example, experiments to compare performance with and without proposed information systems or other tools. We review the state-of-the-art in research of production control systems in construction management, with emphasis on VR and DES. We describe the experience gained in using a hybrid 'Virtual Construction Site' (VCS) system in which construction crew leaders were immersed in a virtual reality (VR) CAVE where they worked in a DES controlled site. The VCS proved its efficacy by allowing the researchers to observe, record and analyze the decision-making behavior of human subjects in a controlled environment, with high accuracy and in relatively very short times.

Keywords: Computer aided simulation,Construction management,Discrete-event simulation,Experimentation,Production system design,Virtual Reality

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf (545,193 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: convr:2013 (browse)
Cluster:
Class:
Similar papers:
Sound: N/A.


Hartvig S, Ersen T

Teaching computing in civil engineering: knowledge systems.

Abstract: "After decades of research and development in ""advanced"" IT, the picture of IT usage in construction remains the same - industry in general is not taking proper advantage of commercially available IT-technologies, as for example knowledge systems. We and others [Raphael 99] think this is caused by the fact that technical universities do not include teaching in advanced computing for civil and building engineers, despite the outspoken need for it. At Department of Planning at the Technical University of Denmark, we have acknowledged this need, and we offer an intensive class in knowledge engineering. Experiences from that course have been presented in [Andersen98]. It is clear to us that this class is valuable, because it enables a fraction of the new generation of professional engineers to cope with 1) knowledge and problem solving and 2) more advanced use of IT. However, it is equally clear that we need to do more - that is: offer teaching in a broader field than just narrow scoped expert systems. We [Andersen98] have pointed out that the relatively narrow scope of the intensive class present a risk of giving the student a too narrow minded attitude to knowledge systems. We are in the process of renewing and possibly expanding our teaching in knowledge systems. To be able to move in the right direction a survey is about to be performed: we are in the process of tracking ""old"" students, now working in industry, in order to learn how our teaching have impacted their professional life and workplace. We seek empirical support for our idea that handling of ""knowledge"", ""problem solving"" and ""concepts"" are key skills for engineers rather than abilities in specific computer applications. The paper will present the results of our survey and considerations, and will include an outline of an improved teaching programme for knowledge systems in civil and building engineering. [Raphael99] Raphael B, Shea K, Smith I, A task and software independent CAE course, in proceedings AICIVIL-COMP99, civil-comp press 99. [Andersen98] Andersen T, Hartvig S, Teaching Knowledge Engineering: Experinces in: Artificial Intelligence in Structural Enginneering, Springer 99"

Keywords:

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf (315,577 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2000 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.education (0.056740) class.impact (0.029838) class.environment (0.027163)
Similar papers:
Sound: read aloud.

Permission to reproduce these documents have been graciously provided by Icelandic Building Research Institute. The assistance of the editor, Mr. Gudni Gudnason, is gratefully appreciated


Hinz O

Using mechanical models as services within object-oriented distributed systems

Abstract: Components are stand-alone software modules which can be used by other components, independent of their programming language and process borders. Components offer their functions through a public interface, called service. The communication between components is controlled by an object request broker (ORB). One of the most common ORBs is ActiveX from Microsoft Co. For software in civil and structural engineering there are no really components available yet. The problem with components is that they should be designed for a big number of reusing cases. This paper shows how mechanical models can be used to define engineering components and they can be used in several concepts of distributed software environments (intra- and internet).

Keywords:

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf ( bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: ecce:1997 (browse)
Cluster:
Class:
Similar papers:
Sound: N/A.


Huhnt W, Kluge M, Laufer H

Mapping technical processes into standard software for business support

Abstract: "Integrated software systems have been implemented in the last years to support business activities in companies including enterprise resource planing. These systems are characterized by the possibility to be customized with respect to the specific processes which already take place in companies. The use of these systems is not restricted to a specific industrial sector. It is of common use to support business activities of construction companies by these systems. Construction companies are characterized by extensive and complex processes which take place in technical divisions. These technical processes are executed for specific projects. To support the technical processes by an information system, two major problems have to be solved. The first problem is concerned with the interaction of the processes which take place in the projects and the processes which are independent of project work. The second problem is concerned with the interaction of technical processes and processes for the business activity. Existing software systems support project work. Therefore, these systems have to be expanded with respect to the technical processes. The paper presents a concept to expand existing software systems in such a way that technical processes are supported as a part of the project work in the context of a company. The technical processes are specified on the base of the set theory. The processes which are supported by the existing system are specified in the same manner. Both specifications are unified. On the basis of this unification, the interaction of the different processes is illustrated. In addition, the specifications are used for the implementation. The specifications of information are used to generate a schema for a data base and to expand the existing schema. The specifications of the tasks are used to identify algorithms which have to be implemented. Results are presented. Technical processes are shown which take place as a part of facility management. The interaction between these technical processes and existing processes is illustrated. On the basis of the existing system Navision financials, the support of technical processes is shown."

Keywords:

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf (289,195 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2000 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.man-software (0.025819) class.commerce (0.023190) class.strategies (0.014065)
Similar papers:
Sound: read aloud.

Permission to reproduce these documents have been graciously provided by Icelandic Building Research Institute. The assistance of the editor, Mr. Gudni Gudnason, is gratefully appreciated


J van Leeuwen, Hendricx A, Fridqvist S

Towards dynamic information modelling in architectural design

Abstract: Product modelling has received a lot of attention in the last decennium and is now growing into a successful means to support design and production processes, also in the area of building and construction. Collaboration through data exchange and model integration are coming within reach for all participants in the building process. However, the applicability of the current approaches in product modelling for architectural design is still very limited. It is the nature of architectural design to give much importance to issues such as uniqueness and diversity in relation with architectural style. Particularly in the earlier stages of the design process, not just technical but also cultural issues play an important role. Standardisation and predefined methodologies of design are not generally appreciated during early design, when ambiguity and a dynamic way of handling design information is often considered very important. The success of computer support for architectural design therefore depends on how well it supports ambiguity and a dynamic handling of design information. This criterion for successful design support systems seems to oppose the need for standardisation and classification that is felt so strongly in the later stages of the building process. The paper describes and discusses three long-term, independent research projects that are being carried out in three European universities: the BAS·CAAD project [1], the IDEA+ project [2], and the VR-DIS project [3]*. While their initiatives were independent and the developments are not formally related, these three projects show strong similarities in terms of objectives, conceptual approach, and methodology. The paper demonstrates that these parallel research projects are paving a new way for the development of design support systems, allowing architects to profit from the benefits of product modelling technologies and enabling integration of early design stages in the complex process of building design and construction. The common objectives of the projects are identified in detail. One of the major issues is schema evolution, or the necessity for a design model to be conceptually adaptable as design proceeds and more information is becoming available or design decisions are reversed. It is also recognised that no assumptions can be made about design methods, and that design information models must support, for instance, both spatial design and design that starts from building elements. Design concepts such as space and user activity play an important role in early design stages and must take a central role in design models as well. Approaches to achieve these objectives can be positioned in the force-field of two pairs of opposite characteristics of design information models. The first pair is (1a) maximum consistency and optimal data exchange through rigidly predefined typologies, versus (1b) maximum flexibility and extensibility of typologies in the conceptual schema. The second pair distinguishes approaches based on (2a) domain independent concepts from those based on (2b) specific domain concepts. The paper discusses the position in these force-fields of each of the three projects, which also clarifies their individual theoretic bases for information modelling. Although these theoretic bases are different in the three projects, common for all three is the object orientation of their approach and, more importantly, the effort to disconnect the identification of objects from the properties of objects. This appears to be an effective means to facilitate flexibility. Also common to the three projects, but elaborated very differently in each of them, is the capability of user-defined extensions to the conceptual schema. Both these issues of flexibility and extensibility are discussed in detail in the paper. Finally, the paper summarises the individual conclusions drawn in three PhD theses reporting intermediary and final results from the projects. This leads to the final discussion of the potentials of schema evolution for the integration of early design stages in the product modelling process. As a basis for the next generation of architectural design support tools, dynamic information models can be expected to deliver an important contribution to the rationalisation of architectural design and are an important next step in solving the conflict between computer tools and designers’ creativity.

Keywords:

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf (251,036 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2001 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.synthesis (0.026635) class.communication (0.026053) class.represent (0.024858)
Similar papers:
Sound: read aloud.

Permission to reproduce these documents have been graciously provided by CSIR Building and Construction Technology. The assistance of the editors, Mr. Gustav Coetzee and Mr. Frances Boshoff, is gratefully appreciated.


Jesus M. de la Garza, Ignaci Roca, Jennifer Sparrow

Visualization of Failed Highway Assets Through Geo-Coded Pictures in Google Earth and Google Maps

Abstract: The Virginia Department of Transportation (VDOT) has adopted an innovative highway asset management program known as Performance-Based Road Maintenance. Under the Virginia Tech-VDOT Partnership for Highway Maintenance Monitoring Programs, Virginia Tech’s Center for Highway Asset Management Programs provides independent assessment and technical leadership to support innovations in highway maintenance contracting and asset management practices. In the past, VDOT’s only way of checking a failed asset item was to go out to the field. This was very time consuming, especially if the assets were numerous or far apart. Moreover, it was often difficult to locate a specific asset item failure in a given segment. In other cases, finding the failure was impossible, since the condition of some asset items can change in a short span of time. This paper presents the development of a comprehensive system to display pictures of failed asset items. The major contribution of this system is to provide VDOT a tool to check any failed asset item from any computer with an Internet connection, eliminating the need to go out to the field and visit each individual site. The proposed technologies and processes were implemented as a pilot project in the Staunton South 2009 Maintenance Rating Program Evaluation. Results from the pilot project were used to evaluate how the system can enhance current highway asset management practices.

Keywords: Quality management, building information modeling, civil information modeling, facility management, IFC

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf (2,070,676 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2010 (browse)
Cluster:
Class:
Similar papers:
Sound: N/A.


K Duddy, S Beazley, R Drogemuller, J Kiegeland

A Platform-independent Product Library for BIM

Abstract:

Keywords:

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf (963,133 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2013 (browse)
Cluster:
Class:
Similar papers:
Sound: N/A.


Kaitanen K

Java based solution for generic product data browsing

Abstract: In its' earlier and on-going research projects VTT has developed generic meta-level productdata models considering especially the needs of the construction industry. In this particularapproach a new application, generic product data browser, has been developed ontop of this fundamental modelling work by using the new Java technology.Java is a fully object-oriented platform independent programming language, which enablesyou to make easily robust, multi-threaded implementations fully integrated to Internet. Thenew technology supports also component based programming (JavaBeans, CORBA) andderived objects. The browser application, called "Starlet", is fully implemented with Javaand can be run anywhere through any Java-supported web-browser like Netscape or MSInternet Explorer. The applicavpvption can be run also locally as a stand-alone program.The product data model used by "Starlet" is based on a generic meta-model. This highlevelschema, defined by EXPRESS-G, supports generic product data management andgives the application a lot of flexibility and scalability in describing your product data classstructures and for example object grouping. The schema supports easier mapping to andfrom e.g. already available and yet to come IFC-schemata without any loss of product datainformation.

Keywords:

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf (123,471 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:1997 (browse)
Cluster:
Class:
Similar papers:
Sound: N/A.


Karumo Jari, Majahalme Tapio

Database approach to cost effective design of a frame system

Abstract: In structural design, there are plenty of analysis software which handle individual building components, but there are only few programs that view the individual components as comprising a system needing a conceptual solution. The general trend in software development has been to concentrate on case dependent solutions incapable of general use or data transportation to other applications. This study has attempted to address these short comings. The goal of the research was familiarization with modeling of computer application for structural design. The focus was the choice structure to be used during project planning phase of the frame systems in an ofice building. Part of the research project was to create new application software, which was used to test the presented models. In this research the modeling of the frame systems was carried out using activity and conceptual models. The activity model was used to describe the actions and decisions made in the process of choosing of the frame system. The emphasis was in the search for the situations where choices are guided by economical factors. The conceptual modeling was realized using the ER model. In it, the frame system was presented in three segments. Each segment formed its own independent part. The main idea was that frame systems are constructed of building components attached together; and each of those has it' own manufacturing, transportation and assembly costs, depending on the type of the component. The application created in the research project was used in testing the models. The basic requirement for the demonstration of the software was the need for a graphical representation of the modeling of the frame systems. The interface of the application was a CAD system. A relational database system was used to store the information. Both graphical and alphanumeric libraries of the main building component types of the frame were made. The design of the frame systems was carried out by choosing the types of the component instances from the library. The equivalent instances in the graphical and the relation database were linked together: Thus the databases of the systems could be used as a whole, even though the information was located in different databases.

Keywords:

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf (1,341,714 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:1994 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.analysis (0.021390) class.economic (0.017714) class.store (0.010036)
Similar papers:
Sound: read aloud.

Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by VTT, Espoo, Finland.


For more results click below:

 

hosted by University of Ljubljana



includes

W78




© itc.scix.net 2003
show page 1 this is page 2 show page 3 show page 4 Home page of this database login Powered by SciX Open Publishing Services 1.002 February 16, 2003