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Shen Q

A knowledge-based model for coordinating design through value management

Abstract: The design and construction of building projects is an extremely complex undertaking, which involves people from many different professional backgrounds having different commeraal interests. This complexity has led to greater interdependency between specialisations, which produces a consequent. need for strong integration of the independent professions and skills. It is clear that the success of the design process, to a large extent, depends upon the way in which the architects, engineers, quantity surveyors and others work together. It depends upon them perceiving the same objectives for the project and recognising that what each of them achieves depends upon what the others do. This paper explores how design can be co-ordinated through the uses of knowledge-based systems and value management. A knowledge-based model for co-ordinating building design through value management is given to demonstrate the viability. The model enables a number of people to work together on a project, or in large chunks than is possible with the more solo methods it replaces. The limitations of the model are also discussed

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Full text: content.pdf (1,147,696 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:1995 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.social (0.024131) class.communication (0.013231) class.bestPractise (0.008040)
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Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by the Stanford University, USA. The support of the editors, particularly Prof. Fischer is gratefully appreciated.


Stouffs R, Tunçer B, Sariyildiz S

Empowering individuals to design and build collaborative information spaces

Abstract: Web-based project management applications serve project teams and virtual enterprises to manage project information anywhere, anytime. Central to these applications is an EDMS that enables team members to store and organize all project documents, independent of type and format. We consider two problems regarding the adoption and effective utilization of such systems. Firstly, the advantages of using an EDMS become apparent only after a relatively large collection of documents has been stored and organized in the system. Secondly, EDMS's currently offer little support for searching and retrieving information that straddles various documents. In order to address both problems, we propose a number of user abilities to add to current EDMS functionalities, offering the user increased freedom in locating and placing a document within a collaborative information space. We explore these abilities at the hand of two information environments: one developed for the Swiss AEC industry, the other currently under development as a common and extensible library for design precedents' analyses.

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Full text: content.pdf (358,232 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2002 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.communication (0.048240) class.collaboration (0.015013) class.retrieve (0.015007)
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Permission to reproduce these documents have been graciously provided by the Aarhus School of Architecture, Denmark. The assistnace of the editor, Prof. Kristian Agger, is gratefully aprecciated.


Tarandi V

Object oriented communication with NICC (neutral intelligent CAD communication)

Abstract: NICC is a recommendation of the Swedish construction industry for Neutral Intelligent CAD Communication. It will make it possible for different participants in the industry to exchange information in a standardized way, independent of which CAD-system they have chosen. As NICC describes building objects (walls, windows, doors, etc) it makes it possible to transfer uniform and structured information during the whole process. The description of the building objects in NICC is based upon a simplified geometry. NICC can manage GEOMETRY OBJECTS (building objects and spaces), SYSTEMS (logical groupings of geometry objects), CONNECTIONS (between geometry objects) and LOCATIONS. The idea behind NICC is to transfer information about Ilintelligent " building objects classified after a standard, in Sweden the BSAB-system. Each CAD-system, drawing or model oriented, has to map its own structured data to the minimal meta model of NICC.

Keywords: CAD; communication; building objects; conceptual model; step

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Full text: content.pdf (390,770 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:1993 (browse)
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Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by the National University of Singapore. The assistance of the editors, particularly Prof. Martin Betts, is gratefully appreciated.


Turk Z, Bjork B C, Johansson C, Svensson K

Document management systems as an essential step towards CIC

Abstract: Within the context of the construction industry Electronic Document Management (EDM) systems offer the means for rapidly achieving a shallow level of integration by providing process integration and information management on a coarse, document sized level of detail. A question which so far has received little attention is how construction document management (CDM) can provide a smooth transition toward computer-integrated construction, based on full-grown building product data models. An important research question for researchers developing a theoretical basis for CIC is to define hybrid conceptual models which synthesise these two levels of data management and describe accurately in an application independent way the CIC processes where a part of the information is managed by CDM systems and a part using product and project models. As a pre-stage to the definition of formal models of the information manipulated by CDM systems we elaborate the functional requirements that such systems should fulfil. Next we describe a four dimensional CDM modelling space - product dimension (relation to product model and product decomposition), time dimension (document life cycle), organisation dimension and finally presentation dimension. In the end a document classification table which includes generic document properties sorted according to the four dimensions described above is presented and directions for further research are indicated.

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Full text: content.pdf (1,577,647 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:1994 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.store (0.045133) class.represent (0.026119) class.processing (0.010703)
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Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by VTT, Espoo, Finland.


W Gielingh

Rethinking Conceptual Structures and their Expression - Part 1 An Essay about Concept Formation and Symbology

Abstract: Meaningful communication between people, organizations and information processing systems - using any form of symbolic expression - requires the unambiguous and precise definition of terms. And although symbolic arguments can be expressed with formal rigour, it is still unclear what symbols or terms mean for individual people, organisations or information processing systems. Even formal and official standards use subjective and imprecise definitions of terms. This paper detaches conceptual structures from symbols, analyses their cognitive origin, and proposes an approach that may support a more precise and view independent expression of knowledge.

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Full text: content.pdf (706,497 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2005 (browse)
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Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by the Technische Universität Dresden.


Wen M-C,Tsai M-H,Kang S-C,Chang Y-L

Flood game: an alternative approach for disaster education

Abstract: Flooding is a frequent disaster in typhoon season in Taiwan nearly every year. To prevent flooding, the decision-makers need to invest in costly constructions, such as embankments and disaster parks. They also need to carefully allocate resources, such as sand bags and pumps, to minimize the damage caused by the heavy rain during a typhoon. This paper presents an ongoing disaster education project, for disaster education for which we designed a flood game allowing high school students to play the role of the decision makers. We based the flood game on the popular “tower defense game,” in which players need to allocate limited resources before and during random attacks because the decision behaviors are very similar between the decision makers of flood prevention and the players of tower defense. The flood game has two independent goals: happiness index and money. The happiness index represents the citizens’ satisfaction. The money is a subtraction of the construction items from the total tax income. If the city is well protected, the tax income will increase and vice versa. The players need to wisely allocate the money to build the necessary facilities around the riverside in the right places and at the right time to maximize efficiency of the expenditure. We included six common construction items for flood prevention, including sand bags, pumps, dikes, disaster parks, green roofs, and green streets. We also developed six levels for the game, from the easiest (only one available construction item) to the most difficult (six available construction items) to help players progressively learn the game. If the city resists attacks from heavy rain successfully, the players can pass the level and proceed to the next one. To validate the use of the game, we tested the game with 148 high school students and found that it cannot only increase their interest in learning but also help students understand the complexity of flood prevention for the decision-makers. In the near future, we will develop follow-up teaching materials and videos to leverage the learning outcome after playing the game.

Keywords: Game-Based Learning,Interactive Game,Flood Defense,Education

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Full text: content.pdf (1,134,206 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: convr:2013 (browse)
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Willems P

A meta-topology for product modeling

Abstract: A major issue in product modeling is the integration of two essentially different modeling approaches: the top-down functional-oriented approach, and the bottom-up technical-oriented approach. The ISO-STEP General AEC Reference Model (GARM) supports this dual design principle around the kernel entities Functional Unit and Technical Solution. During the development of GARM a number of topology related issues were encountered. To mention two main issues: - How to structure a functional network to be consistent over several decomposition/aggregation levels, as well as over the branches of the hierarchical tree? - How to relate this network and the multiple coexisting representations which share this same kernel? Both issues can be addressed, in principle, using a pure topology independent network and an intermediate layer to relate the dependent representations. This intermediate layer is called: Meta-Topology.

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Full text: content.pdf (2,056,219 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:1988 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.represent (0.018966) class.software development (0.013084) class.analysis (0.011219)
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Permission to reproduce these documents has been graciously provided by the Lund University and the Swedish Building Centre. The assistance of the editors, Prof. Per Christiansson and Prof. Henry Karlsson, is gratefully appreciated.


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