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T Cerovšek

IMREC: A long-term reference collection for the advancement of ‘Information Management and Retrieval in Engineering’ (IMRE)

Abstract: An open-access edited repository providing a long-term scientific reference collection for research and development (R&D) in Information Management and Retrieval in Engineering (IMRE) is presented. IMRE goes beyond textual information retrieval (IR), as it addresses vast volumes of project-specific, task-centred, non-/semi-/well-structured engineering alphanumeric, graphical, 3D geometry and model data (e.g., analytical models, time-history series, analysis results and BIM). To facilitate the R&D in IMRE and to avoid redundant preparation of test data for large-scale test-beds IMRE Reference Collection (IMREC) is proposed. IMREC will provide a set of relevant queries, reference collections and procedures that will make IR benchmarks repeatable, comparable and interoperable. The purpose of this paper is to present the approach and to invite peers to make use of and to contribute to IMREC. IMREC uses an R3-M6 approach, where R3 stands for Relevant, Reachable and Representative and M6 stands for Measurable, Multi-standpoint, Multi-application, Multi-phase, Multi-level-of-detail and Multi-lingual. Initially, we reviewed more than 70 existing test collections, developed a Dublin-Core repository and primed sample data. IMREC will serve for the R&D in IMRE to better address engineering information needs, improve communication in R&D and allow for technology transfer.

Keywords: information management, information retrieval, reference collections, aec workflows, bim

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Series: w78:2011 (browse)
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U Gökçe, H U Gökçe, R J Scherer

The Construction Management Phases for Software Interoperability

Abstract: Interoperability of the heterogeneous applications used in the domain of construction management can be best achieved by using generalized and standardized representations of the required data, thereby enabling faster and better management and decision-making in the construction process. This can be achieved by merging the organizational context and the information involved. The developed Construction Management Phases namely (1) Design, (2) Bidding Preparation, (3) Planning & Construction, (4) Projects Payments, (5) Evaluation of the Outcome and Feedback in this paper represents software integration with regard to design, resource planning and scheduling in the Construction General Life Cycle Model Phases, and is dedicated to the Construction Company view. This new approach composed of five integrated phases is named as “Construction Management Phases for Software Interoperability” (CMPSI). The phase representations are provided in IDEFØ modelling method. This representation facilitates the revelation of Construction Management Resources that are used for the implementation of IFC Views. The CMPSI is developed as a framework model that is capable of representing diverse targets of different software involved in the integration process. Therefore, a mechanism, by which the systematic and consistent interfacing of the envisaged systems supported, is obtained. The generalisation within the structure allows flexible application. This is achieved at a variety of strategic levels across a variety of projects using combinations of software in an interoperable structure.

Keywords: Construction Management Phases, Construction Management Processes, Software Interoperability, Concurrent Engineering, Industry Foundation Classes (IFC)

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Series: w78:2011 (browse)
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V Bazjanac

Model based cost and energy performance estimation during schematic design

Abstract: The U.S. General Services Administration (GSA) may require the submission of an IFC based Building Information Model (BIM) at the end of schematic design in the foreseeable future. The driving force behind this possible requirement is GSA need to obtain much more frequent and reliable cost and energy performance estimates from building design projects they fund. This, and similar initiatives that may be forthcoming in the U.S. and elsewhere, will force architectural and engineering firms to use model based CAD software in their work. Cost estimating and building energy performance simulation and analysis, done with interoperable software tools, will draw some of the data needed for its work directly from a BIM. Direct import and reuse of building data will inevitably cause process change in practice. Some design decisions will have to be made (much) earlier in the design process: greater emphasis will have to be given to multi-disciplinary work earlier in a project. A need for new skills will arise in practice. A ""new generation"" of software tools will be deployed and project staffs will have to learn how to use them competently and effectively.""

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Full text: content.pdf (725,928 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2005 (browse)
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Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by the Technische Universität Dresden.


Vladimir Bazjanac, Arto Kiviniemi

Reduction, simplification, translation and interpretation in the exchange of model data

Abstract: A major purpose of Building Information Models (BIM) is to serve as a comprehensive repository of data that are retrievable by multiple software applications which participate in the same AECO industry project. Data placed in a BIM by one software application are retrieved and used by other applications. Retrieved data are at times not useable by the recipient application in exactly the same form as received; in such cases the received data are ma-nipulated and/or transformed before they can be used. This paper provides an overview of issues that arise when data transformation is necessary for “downstream” applica-tions that use data authored by model based CAD and/or other interoperable software. These include manual and semi-manual data transformation, as well as rules for data set reduction and simplification, and rules for data translation and interpretation. The rules can be imbedded in data model views and middleware to become part of a seamless proc-ess of data exchange and sharing.

Keywords: buildings, data modeling, BIM, data transformation, data reduction, data, simplification, data transla-tion, data interpretation, rules of transformation

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Full text: content.pdf (204,384 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2007 (browse)
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Vladimir Bazjanac

IFC BIM-BASED METHODOLOGY FOR SEMI-AUTOMATED BUILDING ENERGY PERFORMANCE SIMULATION

Abstract: Building energy performance (BEP) simulation is still rarely used in building design, commissioning and operations. The process is too costly and too labor intensive, and it takes too long to deliver results. Its quantitative results are not reproducible due to arbitrary decisions and assumptions made in simulation model definition, and can be trusted only under special circumstances.A methodology to semi-automate BEP simulation preparation and execution makes this process much more effective. It incorporates principles of information science and aims to eliminate inappropriate human intervention that results in subjective and arbitrary decisions. This is achieved by automating every part of the BEP modeling and simulation process that can be automated, by relying on data from original sources, and by making any necessary data transformation rule-based and automated.This paper describes the new methodology and its relationship to IFC-based BIM and software interoperability. It identifies five steps that are critical to its implementation, and shows what part of the methodology can be applied today. The paper concludes with a discussion of application to simulation with EnergyPlus, and describes data transformation rules embedded in the new Geometry Simplification Tool (GST).

Keywords: Simulation, simulation input, IFC-based BIM, interoperable software, data transformation, rules, methodology, semi-automated process

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Series: w78:2008 (browse)
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Yongcheol Lee, Eunhwa Yang, Charles Eastman and Kathy Roper

Modularized Validation of a Building Information Model According to the Specifications of the Facility Management Handover and Cobie

Abstract: With increasing requirements and complexity in building projects, diverse domain experts employ a neutral file format, which is exchangeable and interoperable among heterogeneous BIM authoring tools and applications in diverse disciplines. The Construction-Operations Building Information Exchange (COBie) is a set of the specifications of building data exchange pertaining to building asset information. For interoperability, COBie is defined as a model view, which is the subset of the Industry Foundation Classes (IFC) schema. For ensured interoperability of BIM data, using COBie model view, domain professionals and software developers need to identify 1) whether their IFC instance files include required information on building asset management and 2) whether their IFC interfaces accurately import/export IFC files according to the COBie specifications. However, since no approach currently supports this validation testing, professionals manually evaluate an IFC instance file and their IFC binding processes in order to identify semantic errors, technical problems, and translation mapping issues. To enhance the efficiency of this time-consuming and labor-intensive evaluation process, this study proposes a validation framework for evaluating IFC instance files pertaining to the conformity to the COBie specifications. In addition, this study formalizes the requirements of the COBie model view using identified rule logic. For validation, rules are implemented on a modularized validation platform developed on top of the IfcDoc tool, which is a model view documentation and validation tool.

Keywords: BIM, IFC, Facility Management, Cobie, Interoperability Checking

DOI: https://doi.org/10.24928/JC3-2017/0080

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Series: jc3:2017 (browse)
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Yum K-K, Drogemuller R

Managing dynamic life-cycle-dependent buildingobjects in a distributed computing environment

Abstract: Building and construction business processes involve various stakeholders located indifferent locations over the life cycle stages of buildings. In order to develop anyautomated solutions for improving these processes, there is a need to develop a flexibleframework that can deal with two important issues:(a) common data for sharing and access across networked computers over time;(b) management of data for the protection of rightful access and for the reduction ofinformation overloading.While there had been many attempts in the past to provide "logical" industry informationframeworks for integration, they proved to be difficult for a "fragmented" industry like theconstruction industry to adopt. For any integration framework to be useful for collectiveimplementation, this paper argues that the AEC (Architecture, Engineering andConstruction) business/enterprise views should be captured in an open interoperablearchitecture. The gist of the business/enterprise view point is that users can play variousroles (owner/operator, architects, etc.) at various life cycle stages (briefing, conceptualdesign, detail design, construction, operation, etc.); and through these roles, users canconnect to various building model servers and various software tools. Embedded in thisbusiness model is a simple and yet powerful threaded relationship "users - business rolesand life cycle stages - tools and data". It is powerful because it supports a generic datamanagement regime: users can select various permissible roles in various life cycle stagesto access legitimate tools and data within various building model servers. It is simplebecause it is compatible with today's network operating system login procedures and thepassword protection mechanism of files and folders. As people, end users and developersalike are familiar with the basic paradigm of "data manipulation through software tools".The above two features of the business view reinforce each other for gradual acceptance bythe AEC industry. What is needed is a critical mass from an industry alliance to initiate afeasibility study of the interoperable architecture, its business views and other supportingview points (information views, engineering views and technical views) for a quickdemonstration.This paper also presents some usage scenarios demonstrating how a user logs on as adesigner and connects to a design tool accessing data objects in a building model server.

Keywords: Modeling methodologies and technologies; discipline/phase specific models; interoperablearchitectures, business models, information models.

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Full text: content.pdf (84,310 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:1997 (browse)
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