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Andrea Buda, Tuomas Kinnunen, Bhargav Dave and Kary Främling

Developing a Campus Wide Building Information System Based on Open Standards

Abstract: University campuses can significantly benefit from IoT technologies, especially from operational efficiencies and user experience perspective. Traditionally, such systems have been limited to lab based environments, where involvement of end-users is limited and the results may not reflect reality. To build IoT systems for real-world that are reliable and relevant, it is important to build experiments in real-world conditions and involve end-users. From technological perspective, there is a need for convergence of diverse fields ranging from Building Information Systems and Building Services to Building Automation Systems, IoT devices and finally the campus services that include academic and research activities.This paper outlines the efforts to develop a campus wide web based system called Otaniemi3D that provides information about energy usage, occupancy and user comfort by integrating Building Information Models and IoT devices through open messaging standards (O-MI and O-DF) and IFC models. The paper describes the design criteria and the system architecture and the workflow to generate the information needed to develop such a system.

Keywords: Internet of Things, BIM, Smartcampus, Open Standards

DOI: https://doi.org/10.24928/JC3-2017/0338

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Series: jc3:2017 (browse)
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B. Omar, S. Abu Hassan & T. Ballal

Exploring Context-Awareness in the construction logistics services delivery

Abstract: Managing a construction project supply chain effectively and efficiently is extremely difficult due to involvement of numerous sectors that are supported by ineffective communication system. An efficient construction supply chain system ensures the delivery of materials and other services to construction site while minimising costs and rewarding all sectors based on value added to the supply chain. The advancement of information, communication and wireless technologies is driving construction companies to deploy supply chain management strategies to seek better outputs. As part of the emerging wireless technologies, context-aware computing capability represents the next generation of ICT to the construction services. Conceptually, context-awareness could be integrated with Web Services in order to ensure the delivery of pertinent information to construction site and enhance construction supply chain collaboration. An initial study has indicated that this integrated system has the potential of serving and improving the construction services delivery through access to context-specific data, information and services on as-needed basis.

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Full text: content.pdf (192,550 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2009 (browse)
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Bouchlaghem D, Rezgui Y, Hassanen M, Cooper G, Rose D

IT tools and support for improved briefing

Abstract: "The briefing stage is critical to the success of construction projects, however it is widely recognised that improvements are needed in this process in order to reduce the cost and optimise quality of buildings. Briefing involves understanding the client's needs and expressing them in a way that will ensure compatibility between the client's vision of the project and the resulting product. There are problems encountered in construction briefing which involve both clients and designers. There is little guidance and support for clients, whilst designers have difficulties both in capturing clients’ needs and conveying conceptual design options to them. There is a central difficulty, associated with language, communication and the exchange of information between clients and design teams, which is now gaining widespread acknowledgement. The CoBrITe (LINK/IDAC UK funded) project argues that the construction industry has yet to exploit the potential of IT systems to assist both parties during this critical phase. This is in contrast to later stages of design and construction where computer-based techniques and systems are commonplace. The overall aim of the CoBrITe project is to improve the briefing process through more efficient and effective use of existing and emerging information technologies that can support client and design teams. The project builds on the recent IDAC 88 project: Managing the Brief as a Process of Innovation, and its five key action areas for improvement: empowering the client, managing the project dynamics, appropriate team building, appropriate visualisation techniques, and appropriate user involvement. It is driven by the needs of solving challenges within the briefing and related design process, with IT a means to an end. The project brings together a group of companies from across the construction supply chain to work together towards the above aim. The methodology comprises: -An extensive literature review on construction briefing focusing on the process of briefing, human and cultural issues, and IT applications and their role within the process. ·The integration of the recent and current projects on briefing through interviews, establishing an electronic network and holding workshops. ·The formulation of a framework of enabling technologies and their potential role in facilitating the briefing process and overcoming human and organisational constraints. ·The development of a model which will facilitate the integration of activities and information sharing in the briefing process. The proposed paper will give a comprehensive overview of the CoBrITe project, including an analysis of the briefing practices and information requirement, an initial CoBrITe Briefing Process Model, the CoBrITe system architecture, and the description of the proposed framework that integrates a set of proprietary and commercial software applications aimed at supporting the briefing process."

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Full text: content.pdf (319,634 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2000 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.roadmaps (0.015409) class.processing (0.014768) class.economic (0.012134)
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Permission to reproduce these documents have been graciously provided by Icelandic Building Research Institute. The assistance of the editor, Mr. Gudni Gudnason, is gratefully appreciated


C M Tam, Arthur W T Leung

Using Construction Process Simulation to Assess Productivity of Laying Water Mains in Hong Kong

Abstract: Construction process simulation is becoming a general technique in managing design and construction processes in the western world (Hossain and Chua 2009). However, there is a paucity of records on its practical application in Hong Kong and in the Greater China. Thus, it still remains as a tool for generating academic papers within the academic arena. In Hong Kong, there is a plan to upgrade 45% of the existing 7,700 km of water mains, giving a total of 3,000 km of aged water mains to be replaced in the next couples of years. In managing this sheer amount of construction works, studying its productivity is of prime importance in order to complete the works on time and within budget. This study has applied one of the simplest simulation tools, Web-CYCLONE, to assess the productivity and explore ways to optimize it. The study reveals that Web-CYCLONE is user-friendly in assessing productivity. However, it has a number of shortfalls. For example, in running two consecutive programs, the system needs to be refreshed to renew the interface and trace the charts and diagrams generated. Besides, Web-CYCLONE has the limitation of inability in identifying the critical path of a project and thus the floats cannot be considered. Web-CYCLONE is also difficult in modeling projects with complex resource involvement.

Keywords: water mains construction, construction process simulation, productivity

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Series: w78:2010 (browse)
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Ekaterina Petrova, Mai Brink Rasmussen, Rasmus Lund Jensen and Kjeld Svidt

Integrating Virtual Reality and BIM for End-User Involvement in Design: A Case Study

Abstract: The outcome of projects within Architecture, Engineering, and Construction is highly dependent on the quality of the collaboration between the involved actors. The end-users occupy the buildings on a daily basis, and therefore their involvement in the design process is essential to the output. However, traditional practices place the responsibility of decision-making mostly in the architectsÕ hands. Virtual Reality technologies coupled with Building Information Modelling have the potential to improve the collaboration and data visualization in the building design.This paper presents the findings from a case study on the integration of Building Information Modelling and Virtual Reality for user-centred participatory interior furnishing of a new university building. Besides a significant reduction in the time for generation of alternative proposals, the end results show an increased attachment of the employees to their future workplace and a high level of acceptance towards the technology. Finally, the authors present suggestions for further work, which could improve future design processes utilizing the Virtual Reality technology.

Keywords: Virtual Reality, Building Information Modelling, End-User Involvement, Interior Design, Participatory Design

DOI: https://doi.org/10.24928/JC3-2017/0266

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Series: jc3:2017 (browse)
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Hemmet F J

Project management in the IT era

Abstract: The author has been concerned with the development and application of computer management systems far the construction and allied industries far more than a decade. Based OR that experience the evolution of IT based management systems is traced over that period. The present state of development is examined and an attempt is made to look forward to the possibilities which are becoming daily more apparent. Particular the role of the Client and his increasing involvement in the process is discussed and examined and the effect of the growing demand for quality control in performance and product, through IT systems is discussed.

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Full text: content.pdf (1,226,752 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:1993 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.communication (0.022000) class.deployment (0.009739)
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Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by the National University of Singapore. The assistance of the editors, particularly Prof. Martin Betts, is gratefully appreciated.


Hitchcock R J

Improving building life-cycle information management through dwumfntatiqm and communication of project objectives

Abstract: Most CurrentIy available computer tools for the building industry proffer little more than productivity improvement in the transmission of graphical drawings and textual specifications, without addressing more fundamental changes in building life-cycle information management. This paper describes preliminary research into the development of a fiamework for the aocumentation and communication of the project objectives of a building project. When implemented in an interactive networked environment, this fiamework is intended to promote multiple participant involvement in the establishment and use of a common set of explicit goals, from the earliest phase of a project throughout its life cycle. A number of potential applications for this fiamework are identified. The requirements for integrating this life-cycle information with a product model of the physical design of a building, in an attempt to document and communicate design intent, are also discussed.

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Full text: content.pdf (1,203,986 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:1995 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.processing (0.057537) class.communication (0.038791) class.collaboration (0.018078)
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Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by the Stanford University, USA. The support of the editors, particularly Prof. Fischer is gratefully appreciated.


Howard R W

Reverse propagation of data for building management

Abstract: Lifetime data for the management of buildings is becoming more feasible and is now expected by more facilities managers. It should be possible to extract the data related to the building fabric and systems from that generated during design and construction. For this to be just what the users require and in the form they require it, depends upon their involvement at an early stage of a project. Reverse propagation can then enable their wishes to influence the data collected so that redundant data is not produced and does not cause confusion. New forms of procurement such as partnering, allow this early involvement; alternatively there must be standards to define the general form of management data. In Denmark the CIS-CAD system defines a simple format being tested on a series of projects. It extracts information needed for statutory authorities and management, and examples are given based on continuing experience of its use. The principles of reverse propagation are discussed and the trend in databases to allow input from both ends of the process. This will eventually allow a more precise and economic definition of the building model and core data needed for management.

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Full text: content.pdf (108,012 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:1999 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.economic (0.014458) class.represent (0.010812) class.store (0.010747)
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Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by the Research Press of the National Research Council of Canada. The support of the editors, particularly Dr. Dana Vanier, is gratefully appreciated.


Howard R, Petersen E

Monitoring Communication in Partnering Projects

Abstract: This report is a summary of a two year research project carried out by the IT byg group at BYG. DTU for the Danish government agencies Erhvervsfremmestyrelsen and By- og Bolig-ministeriet. The objectives were to collect data on the use of IT by the PPB housing consortia, a development project to test out various innovations, to map communications between the partners, and compare IT usage with their original proposals. Data was collected on communications in housing projects in the period June 1999- Aug 2000. The original PPB proposals were made in 1994/5 but there have been breaks in the flow of projects, and information technology has gone through much change since then. Use of Email has taken over from post and fax, and Project Webs have been developed in most consortia. Consortium members' policies have dominated the choice of management and logistics software, restricted compatibility in the consortia, and limited willingness to share data. Greater involvement by the client, and more sharing of equity, would have encouraged adoption of common IT systems and created more trust for data sharing between partners. PPB projects have allowed consortium members to test out new technologies but, in general, the IT systems used have been similar to those which the larger firms use elsewhere. Vertical integration has been limited by lack of experience and technology in smaller firms. In future, access to Project Webs from mobile devices should help use by all partners from any location. In all the projects studied, and in spite of the introduction of Email and Project Webs, the ratio of non-IT communications to IT varied from 0.8 to 4.6. When problems need to be solved rapidly there appears to be a tendency to revert to traditional means of communication - meetings, telephone and fax.

Keywords: communications, partnering, project web, social network analysis, housing

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Full text: http://www.itcon.org/2001/1 (available to registered users only)

Series: itcon:2001 (browse)
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L Manzione, M Wyse, R Sacks, L Van Berlo, S B Melhado

KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATORS TO ANALYZE AND IMPROVE MANAGEMENT OF INFORMATION FLOW IN THE BIM DESIGN PROCESSand improve management of information flow in the BIM design process

Abstract: Thanks to the interoperability provided by the IFC standard, BIM technologies and IFC model servers are beginning to enable a design environment where the exchange of information among the actors can be synchronous and continuous using a single and central data model. Although this new set of technologies enables concurrent design, the problems associated with managing the flow of information itself in a concurrent design environment requires explicit management of editing rights and version control at the level of individual objects, rather than at the file level. However, while these are technical issues that have standard solutions, managing designers’ involvement in the process also becomes more challenging, requiring the development of new management methods suitable for the BIM collaborative environment.Common problems such as information ‘overflow’, incomplete modelling solutions or incorrectly matched technical solutions, and inventories of work in progress due to inattentive designers, if not treated methodically in the BIM platform, can quickly cause bottlenecks for the advancement of the process. The bottlenecks result in process waste (such as time spent waiting, large inventories of design information, processing sequences that cause unnecessary iterations, long cycle times and schedule overruns, etc.). Application of concepts that allow structuring and measuring of the information flow can improve the process and reduce the waste of resources, but there is no specific methodology for measuring information flow in a BIM environment. Taking a previous study, in which seven key performance indicators were developed and validated for application with conventional technology, as a starting point, this work has developed the methodology for using these indicators in a BIM project.

Keywords: information flow measure, collaborative design, model server, design management

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Series: w78:2011 (browse)
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