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Aouad G, Cooper R, Kagioglou M, Hinks J, Sexton M

A synchronised process/IT model to support the co- maturation of processes and IT in the construction sector

Abstract: In recent years many efforts had taken place in order to develop process and IT maps within the construction sector. However, the subject of co-maturation between IT and the process has not been given enough attention. This has resulted in the development of impractical solutions because of an apparent lack of balance between the IT and process capabilities. For instance, some organisations in the construction sector have adopted the rapid prototyping concept which is widely used within the manufacturing sector without even investing in 3D modelling and VR technologies which are the most appropriate for this task. Paradoxically, some organisations have invested in these technologies, but rapid prototyping is non existent. This paper addresses the issue of co-maturation between the process and IT in order to establish a balanced profile. The work is based on the CMM (Capability Maturity Model) model which was developed by the Software Engineering Institute at Carnegie Mellon University in order to develop software for the US government, particularly to be used by the Department of Defence. The CMM is a five-level model which include ad-hoc, repeatable, defined, managed and optimised stages. The model is designed so that capabilities at lower stages provide progressively stronger foundations for higher stages, reducing the change management risks. Each development stage - or "maturity level" distinguishes an organisation’s process or IT capability. This paper builds on the work achieved within the generic design and construction process protocol (GDCPP) which is being undertaken at the university of Salford. The main contribution of this paper is a conceptual model of co-maturation between IT and process. A synchorised IT/process model will be presented and discussed. This model is being developed through knowledge obtained form the industrial collaborators of the GDCPP project.

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Full text: content.pdf (120,604 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:1998 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.communication (0.029904) class.processing (0.022049) class.impact (0.010457)
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Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden. The assistance of the editors, Prof. Bo-Christer Björk and Dr. Adina Jägbeck, is gratefully appreciated.


Appelqvist I, Keijer U

Building integrity a prototype for an it support system

Abstract: The industrialization of the building industry requires a profound understanding of the interactions between building parts, elements, spaces and systems. The industrialization also causes an increasing number of actors and suppliers to be involved in the building process. The problems concerning interactions are not limited to technical issues. The organization of the process, as well as responsibilities and liabilities of consultants, subcontractors and other actors of the process contribute to the growing implications that constitute the problem in its whole. Neglecting the interaction problems could affect what has been called the Building Integrity problem, BI. The first part of the research has been concentrated to formulate the problem and the key questions to be answered. A conceptual schema describing the BI problem tentatively has been outlined. The schema includes some interesting classifying attributes, e.g. the functions of a building, building parts, spaces, actors and the causes of building defects. A so called "defect model" has been chosen as a base for an IT Support System. The system aims at supporting certain actors to detect BI problems in the building process. A prototype system is currently developed and is described.

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Full text: content.pdf (1,206,229 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:1995 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.man-software (0.029112) class.social (0.016984) class.represent (0.013808)
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Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by the Stanford University, USA. The support of the editors, particularly Prof. Fischer is gratefully appreciated.


Arnold J A, Teicholz P

Modeling and usle of component information in the process industry

Abstract: This in-process research project investigates the life-cycle information requirements for the components3 which are installed in process plant facilities. We have done this to gain insight into existing standards efforts and to understand the content requirements for the development of standard information models that represent such components. This work seeks to understand how these information models may be used to improve business and technical work processes through the development of software applications which support information sharing between component design objects rather than information exchange between design documents.

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Full text: content.pdf (1,424,261 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:1995 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.represent (0.026230) class.commerce (0.019810) class.processing (0.019388)
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Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by the Stanford University, USA. The support of the editors, particularly Prof. Fischer is gratefully appreciated.


Assal H, Eastman C

Engineering database as a medium for translation

Abstract: In this paper we describe the translation facilities as a component of EDM-2 database. We introduce a new approach to translation that is different from the traditional translators in databases and the standard neutral file approach. First, we define design views, which are different from database views in that they allow manipulation of data, and they represent the same object or information in different formats. Second, we define object structures that capture the different representations of objects and define the relationships among them. The two main relationships here are the specialization lattice and the composition lattice. Third, we describe the basic steps of the translation process and generalize the common ones. We provide facilities for developing translators that take advantage of this generalization. We present an example of the most common representations in engineering design (IGES and DXF) to illustrate the various steps and structures in our model.

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Full text: content.pdf (1,318,897 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:1995 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.represent (0.026130) class.synthesis (0.017787) class.store (0.011500)
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Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by the Stanford University, USA. The support of the editors, particularly Prof. Fischer is gratefully appreciated.


Atkin B L

Measuring information integration in project teams

Abstract: Integrated project information is the goal for many clients and their project teams. In theory, the aim is to use IT to support a seamless electronic process in which data are entered once and where no manual intervention interrupts the flows across the different life stages. In practice, IT has been used largely to reinforce existing work patterns that fragment the team's efforts. So far, IT has delivered limited benefits. A study of integrated project information has been completed on 11 building projects across four European countries. Degrees of integration of project information have been measured and used to derive some measure of the extent to which project teams are bound together by the use of IT. This paper summarises the 11 case studies, by revealing the extent to which IT has been successfully applied to support integration. The findings provide pointers to the future application of IT by project teams. In this regard, the active interest of the client in the project and its IT infrastructure is emphasised.

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Full text: content.pdf (415,468 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:1999 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.man-man (0.021680) class.processing (0.012466) class.roadmaps (0.009827)
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Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by the Research Press of the National Research Council of Canada. The support of the editors, particularly Dr. Dana Vanier, is gratefully appreciated.


Augenbroe G

The combine project: a global assessment

Abstract: The outcome of the EU funded COMBINE project will be assessed. The objectives of COMBINE (Computer Models for the Building Industry in Europe) are to deliver the first examples of a future generation of intelligent integrated building design systems to engineering design practices, with the emphasis on the energy and HVAC disciplines. The objective is accomplished by embedding proven IT solutions for data integration in a system architecture that enables the information exchange among the members of a building design team. An overview of the approach of the 70 man years effort between 1990 and 1995 by a consortium of 11 R and D institutions across Europe is presented.. A global assessment of the overall approach and the use of available product data technology that have led to three prototypes of integrated building design systems is given.

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Full text: content.pdf (888,136 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:1995 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.software development (0.012897) class.represent (0.011783) class.roadmaps (0.011353)
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Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by the Stanford University, USA. The support of the editors, particularly Prof. Fischer is gratefully appreciated.


Avani Goyal, Ahmet Kilinc, Minkyung Kang and Burcu Akinci

Energy Efficient Improvements to the Envelope of Low-Income Housing: A Case Study of Habitat for Humanity Homes

Abstract: Low-income families pay substantial portions of their total expenditure on household energy bills, making them vulnerable to rising energy costs. Habitat for Humanity houses are built for low-income families and made affordable with volunteer work and construction material donations. Hence, the trade-off between the homesÕ initial construction costs and their life-time energy costs must be evaluated carefully. This paper targets to support better-informed decisions that balance the affordability of certain construction materials with their potential for energy efficiency. In collaboration with Habitat for Humanity of Westchester, we created an energy simulation model of an existing low-income house and calculated the homeÕs annual energy usage with different design alternatives for windows and walls. The resulting estimated annual energy savings are then evaluated alongside their initial investment costs, which were retrieved from RS Means standard construction cost data and quotations from industry. The results show that it is possible to reduce the energy cost of these houses without significantly increasing the construction costs through exploration of different wall and window options. While specific enclosure suggestions apply to this case-study, the utilized approach on exploring different options to identify opportunities to save energy can be used to understand impact on the lives of low-income families.

Keywords: Low-Income Housing, Energy Efficiency, Cost Analysis, Residential Housing, Habitat for Humanity

DOI: https://doi.org/10.24928/JC3-2017/0067

Full text: content.pdf (994,077 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: jc3:2017 (browse)
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B Hamidi, T Bulbul

An Evaluation of Life Cycle Analysis (LCA) Tools for Environmental Impact Analysis of Building End-of-Life Cycle Operations

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Full text: content.pdf (177,735 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2014 (browse)
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Babic N C, Rebolj D, Hanzic L, Tibaut A

Transfer of road product model usage from academia to practice

Abstract: In Civil Engineering Informatics Centre at the Faculty of Civil Engineering, we are engaged in product models of construction objects. In product models, we see the key for integration of life cycle activities in the construction of individual objects. These activities are being weakly connected. Working on it, we have been focusing specially in the road design field. In the past few years we have developed a road model, called MCT, which is based on geometric road design. As a part of this project we have also made an application prototype, that uses advantages of MCT and enables simple road data transfer among particular life cycle phases. Yet in the early stage of our research project we were aware that our findings have to be tested in practise as soon as possible. Project was funded in part by the government institution that controls road building in Slovenia. For this reason we expected the investor to animate contractors to exchange data with our model. Unfortunately our expectations were not completely fulfilled and therefore the model wasn't verified in practise. Since we believe our model can rationalise road building procedure, we decided to carry out some extra activities, which would stimulate model usage. Therefore we established direct contact with some contractors involved in specific road life cycle phases. This wasn't an easy job, because a great number of small organisations are involved. Contractor's work is usually very clearly defined and computer is just a tool that helps him to do it quicker and better. For this purpose some extra functional modules of Road life-cycle environment (RO) were made and the existing ones were conformed according to the contractors needs. Since contractors are already using particular software to support their engineering process, we also persuaded software producers to include MCT in their programs for road design. This way, we gained broad software support for our model. Article fully describes a road model MCT, Road life-cycle environment RO and especially our efforts to introduce MCT into engineering practise.

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Full text: content.pdf (137,514 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:1998 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.bestPractise (0.092140) class.processing (0.017632) class.education (0.016155)
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Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden. The assistance of the editors, Prof. Bo-Christer Björk and Dr. Adina Jägbeck, is gratefully appreciated.


Bakis N, Kagiouglou M, Aouad G, Amaratunga D, Kishk M, Al-Hajj A

An integrated environment for life cycle costing in construction

Abstract: Life Cycle Costing (LCC) has become increasingly important in construction over the last few years. However, despite its importance, it has found limited application so far. Two of the main barriers in its application are the shortage of LCC data and the complexity of the technique itself. This paper presents a computer-integrated environment, which aims to overcome those barriers by providing a framework/mechanism for collecting and storing the LCC data and a number of tools for assisting and simplifying the application of the technique. The main characteristic of the environment is that it provides a holistic approach to Life Cycle Costing by integrating the collection of the data and the LCC-aware design and management of buildings within a single framework. A database, which is flexible enough to accommodate the needs of any user, is used to store the LCC data. An integrated and interactive design tool is used to assist and simplify the LCC-aware design of buildings. A three-dimensional visualisation tool is used to assist the facilities manager in the LCC-aware management of buildings. Information collected from each building is fed back into the system to update the existing LCC data.

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Full text: content.pdf (281,761 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2003 (browse)
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Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by the University of Auckland. The assistance of the editor who provided the full texts and the structured metadata, Dr. Robert Amor, is gratefully appreciated.


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