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Haksever A M

A model to predict the occurrence of information overload of project managers

Abstract: "This paper investigates information overload of construction project managers. The aim is to identify its occurrence pattern and predict the occurrence probabilities in a given circumstance, as a project manager’s information load is inconstant in nature, fluctuating over time, changing character and source. First, a conceptual definition of information overload is developed, using time as the criterion to describe information load. Information overload for a project manager is taken as occurring when the demands on information processing time exceed the supply of time. Second, the variation of information load throughout the project is structured using the interaction of a project manager with project members through the stages of a project. These two elements are combined in a matrix format where values for information overload are ascribed to cells representing the interaction with each member during each stage of the project. Six key project members, and four project stages are defined. To allow the subjective quantification of information overload, five practical situations of real life information overload are described, of which one must be chosen for each of the twenty four stage-member cells. To test the model and calculate the probabilities of information overload, data were collected using a questionnaire survey of 140 project managers in the UK. Respondents were asked to select the relevant situation for each cell in the matrix. The resulting matrices had a weighting system applied and a mean calculated for each circumstance to create an Information Load Point (ILP), presented in an Information Load Matrix (ILM). The application of ‘Ordinal Logistic Regression’ into the ILP scores provides a predictive outcome, which gives the probabilities of a project manager being in any of the predetermined five information overload situations at any stage with any member. The detailed account of the calculations and the outcome of the analysis are presented. The results revealed that the extent and sources of information overload of construction project managers vary throughout the stages of a project. The construction stage has the highest probability of information overload, followed by the design stage. The main sources of information overload are the project participants contributing the key expertise in each stage. In the design stage, the key contributors are architects and consultants, and in the construction stage, contractors and sub-contractors. Architects’ and consultants’ contributions to information overload show a similar pattern through the project duration, as do those of contractors and sub-contractors. This is the first of its kind in construction project management and provides an invaluable source of reference and guidance on the probabilities of the occurrence of information overload in a construction project. The model predicts the situations where information overload is high, moderate, low or non-existent. It is then possible to concentrate on those overloaded areas by using the appropriate means or strategies."

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Full text: content.pdf (393,534 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2000 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.strategies (0.016354) class.man-software (0.013484) class.impact (0.012353)
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Permission to reproduce these documents have been graciously provided by Icelandic Building Research Institute. The assistance of the editor, Mr. Gudni Gudnason, is gratefully appreciated


Hassanain M A, Froese T M, Vanier D J

Information analysis for roofing systems maintenance management integrated system

Abstract: The Building Envelope Life Cycle Asset Management (BELCAM) project, lead by the National Research Council Canada (NRCC) and Public Works and Government Service Canada (PWGSC), is a "proof of concept" project aimed at helping asset managers to predict the remaining service life of building envelope components and to maximize the return on their maintenance expenditure. The BELCAM project focuses on flat or lowslope conventional roofing systems as a representative domain. This paper focuses on maintenance management, which is primarily concerned with the management of all technical and administrative tasks involved in maintaining a building element in, or restoring it to, a state in which it can perform its intended function. A framework for the integration of the process of managing maintenance of roofing systems is proposed. The framework consists of five sequential steps: (1) Identification of roofing system components requiring assessment, (2) Identification of roofing system performance requirements, (3) Identification of performance assessment methods, (4) Roofing system maintenance planning, (5) Roofing system maintenance operations management. This paper introduces a framework for roofing systems maintenance management. It presents a preliminary analysis of an integrated information system to support maintenance management. The paper follows the development methodology adopted by the International Alliance for Interoperability (IAI) to represent the high-level information within the proposed framework of maintenance management. IAI projects follow a standard process-oriented development methodology, involving the following steps: usage scenarios, process definitions, information analysis and information modeling and validation.

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Full text: content.pdf (87,919 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:1999 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.processing (0.013504) class.represent (0.012912) class.analysis (0.011741)
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Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by the Research Press of the National Research Council of Canada. The support of the editors, particularly Dr. Dana Vanier, is gratefully appreciated.


Hee-Sung Cha, Kyungrai Kim, Dong-Woo Shin

DEVELOPMENT OF 5D-CAD BASED WORK PROCESS MODEL FOR AGED-HOUSING REVAMP PROJECTS

Abstract: A growing number of aged-housing building projects have become a great concern in Korean building industry nowadays. Until 2010, over 20 year-old housing units are reported to exceed more than one million. The aged-housing units are required to upgrade the performance on both structural and service issues. Compared to new building projects, revamp projects are relatively under developed in terms of construction management. For example, there is few guidance or detailed procedure which addresses the management practice in dealing with revamp projects. Therefore, new technologies are reluctantly implemented in the revamp projects without in-depth analysis on constructability and/or economic efficiency. The objective of this study is to provide a new approach in dealing with aged-housing revamp projects. By developing 5D- CAD based work process model, project managers are effectively informed of various data, i.e., building elements, network scheduling, and cost items. The 5D-CAD based decision making can also enhance the accuracy and promptness during project execution. The authors developed a standardized work process model in dealing with 5D-CAD modeling via Virtual ConstructionTM software. In addition, the model has been implemented to pilot aged-housing project for the purpose of validating the feasibility and applicability in real future projects. The proposed WBS(Work Breakdown Structure) and CBS(Cost Breakdown Structure) have been proved as useful tools for contractors who deal with aged-housing revamp projects under circumstances that there is few historical projects and few experienced personnel. Also, the study identified potential benefits and limitations of the 5D-CAD based construction process for revamp projects. Key findings from this study are as follows.- - - - -5D-CAD modeling is no more optional strategy in maximizing the project value. The error-free construction planning is much more essential in revamp projects. Sharing the real-time project information can overcome communication barriers. Collaborative works are definitely can benefit from 5D-CAD modelingFull scale usage of 5D-CAD modeling can be achieved by partnering contract

Keywords: Aged-Housing, CBS(Cost Breakdown Structure), 5D-CAD, WBS(Work Breakdown Structure), Revamp Project

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Full text: content.pdf (1,426,639 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2008 (browse)
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Howard R W

Reverse propagation of data for building management

Abstract: Lifetime data for the management of buildings is becoming more feasible and is now expected by more facilities managers. It should be possible to extract the data related to the building fabric and systems from that generated during design and construction. For this to be just what the users require and in the form they require it, depends upon their involvement at an early stage of a project. Reverse propagation can then enable their wishes to influence the data collected so that redundant data is not produced and does not cause confusion. New forms of procurement such as partnering, allow this early involvement; alternatively there must be standards to define the general form of management data. In Denmark the CIS-CAD system defines a simple format being tested on a series of projects. It extracts information needed for statutory authorities and management, and examples are given based on continuing experience of its use. The principles of reverse propagation are discussed and the trend in databases to allow input from both ends of the process. This will eventually allow a more precise and economic definition of the building model and core data needed for management.

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Full text: content.pdf (108,012 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:1999 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.economic (0.014458) class.represent (0.010812) class.store (0.010747)
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Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by the Research Press of the National Research Council of Canada. The support of the editors, particularly Dr. Dana Vanier, is gratefully appreciated.


Howard R, Kiviniemi A, Samuelson O

Surveys of IT in the Construction Industry and Experience of the IT Barometer in Scandinavia

Abstract: With many surveys being carried out on the use of IT, it is important to ensure that their results can be compared and that they can be repeated to gain a picture of the growth of IT use and of particular successes. The IT barometer survey summarised in this paper compares results from Denmark, Finland and Sweden on the use of computer hardware, software and communications. It is complementary to other surveys looking at the strategic use of IT within companies. Microsoft products dominate both operating systems and office applications in all these countries but there is greater useWindows NT and UNIX in Finland. CAD is used in almost all design offices in Sweden, with Autocad as the dominant product, but Microstation is now more widely used by architects in Denmark. CAD data structures are becoming more advanced with objects being used by more firms in Finland and Sweden, but structured 2D data dominates in Denmark. Communications networks are used in about 90% of Swedish firms but only in about 60% in Denmark. Danish property managers make greater use of computers. Further analysis is needed of the data from Finland, and comparable surveys are being carried out in other countries. The comparison of these is being coordinated by the CIB W78 group which plans to repeat the surveys, using similar questions, in 2000. This will help to measure the increase in awareness and use of IT resulting from national IT development projects which have started in Finland and Sweden. A network linking national IT centres is planned to exchange experience and coordinate this work, so that there can be greater integration of systems between different types of firm in construction, and within international projects.

Keywords: survey, international, computers, CAD, communications, construction industry

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Full text: http://www.itcon.org/1998/4 (available to registered users only)

Series: itcon:1998 (browse)
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Howard R, Kiviniemi A, Samuelson O

The latest developments in communications and e-commerce - IT barometer in 3 Nordic countries

Abstract: Electronic communication and new forms of electronic commerce have been some of the fastest growing areas in information technology in construction. Denmark, Finland and Sweden are in the forefront of applying these technologies, and a recent repeat of the IT Barometer survey of the construction industry presents information from firms of: architects, property owners and managers, contractors, consulting engineers and others. This was first carried out in 1998. Comparisons are now made between levels of IT use then and in 2000/2001, and between the three countries involved. The paper-based survey was developed at KTH in Sweden and the same questions were asked in Denmark and Finland. The survey includes: levels of staff, access to equipment and communications, current and future use of applications software, Intranets and Project Webs, e-commerce, future intentions, benefits and problems. The general aim is to measure progress in take up of technology and compare national differences. The analysis indicates significant differences, with Denmark and Finland having a high level of staff access to PCs and e-mail and Finland making greater use of Project Webs and Intranets. The most interesting comparison is in attitudes to financial control systems, where Swedish and Danish companies place better financial control as a high priority, while it has dropped in importance in Finland. Swedish and Danish companies appear to have most of the CAD facilities they need, but in Finland this is still a priority for investment. A reduced proportion of drawing work is carried out manually by architects and engineers in all three countries, around 15 - 20% for Denmark and Sweden, while this has reduced in Finland from 34% to 6% in the last 3 years and, in Sweden, from 36 - 14% . Ecommerce is most fully developed in Finland where over three quarters of companies have some experience of its use.

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Full text: content.pdf (68,499 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2002 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.commerce (0.075532) class.collaboration (0.073201) class.roadmaps (0.029236)
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Permission to reproduce these documents have been graciously provided by the Aarhus School of Architecture, Denmark. The assistnace of the editor, Prof. Kristian Agger, is gratefully aprecciated.


Igal M. Shohet, Bhanu Tak, Massimiliano Luzi and Matty Revivi

On-Site Mobile Application for Enhanced Safety and Quality

Abstract: Two of the most important factors that site managers have to control during construction are safety and quality. We envisage that the emergence of Information and Communications Technology (ICT) systems could be of great use in effectively promoting safety and quality and exploiting the synergy between these two disciplines. The objectives of this research were to investigate the relationship between safety and quality using an on-site mobile application for communication, control and command of construction safety and quality. A system of key safety and quality performance indicators was compiled in order to evaluate the potential benefits. Safety and quality leading indicators were recorded prior and after intervention process using on-site mobile application. The results showed an improvement of 30% in Quality Indicator (Q.I), 20% in Safety Indicator 1 (S.I.1) and 42% in Safety Indicator 2 (S.I.2) and these differences were found to be statistically significant at the level of 0.99.

Keywords: Communication, Control, Mobile Technology, Quality, Safety

DOI: https://doi.org/10.24928/JC3-2017/0037

Full text: content.pdf (3,399,744 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: jc3:2017 (browse)
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J Lucas, T Bulbul, W Thabet

A LIFECYCLE FRAMEWORK FOR USING BIM IN HEALTHCARE FACILITY MANAGEMENT

Abstract: Facility Management (FM) is important for healthcare environments to provide adequate and safe treatment to patients by maintaining the physical environment. FM activities are challenged by being disconnected from other processes within a facility’s lifecycle. Within healthcare, this disconnect is compounded by insufficient communication with clinical personnel about concurrent clinical operations. Insufficient communication can lead to added risk to patient safety and additional cost to healthcare procedures. This paper describes research on identifying the information across the facility lifecycle and within the facility management and operation stage that are needed to support FM activities in healthcare environments. This information will be used to develop an ontology of integrated FM and clinical information for improving the quality of care in a healthcare setting. The ontology will be linked to a BIM. The ontology will ensure that needed information for facility operations is recorded throughout the lifecycle of the facility and allow facility managers quick access to better organized information. Focus will be on giving an overview of the methods used for determining information needs for FM activities through case study analysis. Case studies are identified through interviews with FM and clinical personnel as well as through literature review. Select cases are documented with Business Process Model Notation (BPMN) allowing for separation of steps and actors within each case. Information needs for each of the steps is determined and overlaid onto the BPMN diagrams. Lastly, the source of each information types is determined. Future work will take the information types, and their origins, determined through this analysis and apply it to an ontology. The ontology will support a BIM-based system for capturing information throughout the lifecycle of the facility in support of the operation and maintenance of the facility.

Keywords: Facility Management, Healthcare, Building Information Modelling, Ontology

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Full text: content.pdf (857,932 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2011 (browse)
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Jones K G

The use of an evaluation matrix to inform the IT strategic planning process for maintenance management

Abstract: The systematic review of information systems is an essential part of the IT strategic planning process. In the context of maintenance management systems this process is normally performed by the maintenance manager. However, many maintenance managers are ill prepared for this task and, as such, new opportunities may be missed or poorly performing computerised systems accepted as the norm. This paper describes the development of a set of practical guidelines in the form of benchmarks which could be used to assist maintenance managers when they review their systems. The benchmarks were based on an evaluation matrix methodology which was used in conjunction with a substantive questionnaire survey of maintenance managers to identify and evaluate the importance and performance of key computerised maintenance functions. The performance of computerised maintenance management systems was evaluated using an evaluation grid and areas of weakness were identified. The potential use of the benchmarks in the strategic review of computerised maintenance management systems is discussed. The paper concludes that the evaluation matrix method can be a useful tool to establish the general level of performance of computerised systems and thus it can inform the IT strategic planning process. In the context of maintenance management systems the evaluation method identified weaknesses in key maintenance processes and these may need to be fundamentally reengineered.

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Full text: content.pdf (114,882 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:1996 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.strategies (0.177931) class.roadmaps (0.011177)
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Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by the University of Ljubljana. The assistance of the editor, Prof. Ziga Turk, is gratefully appreciated.


Kathryn Davies

IT Barometer New Zealand – A Survey of Computer Use and Attitudes in the New Zealand Construction Industry

Abstract: Building productivity in New Zealand lags other countries and industries which invest more heavily in technology. Improved productivity of the construction sector is widely touted as a significant factor in boosting the performance of the country as a whole. Application of IT has for some time been hailed as the key to implementing such productivity gains. International initiatives such as BuildSmart and Integrated Design & Delivery Solutions (IDDS) are very strongly oriented around improving construction through IT. To use their findings, and to allow informed decision making in IT investment, development and education, the New Zealand construction industry needs more information on the current state of IT use.This paper reports on a national survey undertaken in 2009/2010, based on the IT Barometer questionnaire. Elements of a 1997 New Zealand survey of construction IT use, were also incorporated to allow longitudinal analysis.The target population was the construction and facility management sector, in this case including the whole of New Zealand. A wide range of professions fall into this population, including architects (architectural designers and draughtspersons); technical consultants (engineers, quantity surveyors, project managers); contractors and sub-contractors; property owners and managers; and the materials industry (manufacturers and suppliers). The questionnaire was delivered to 388 companies, and 81 completed responses were received, a response rate of 21%.Results show that while most companies use computers, for many it is primarily a business tool for administrative functions, rather than a tool in the construction process. Use of specialist construction-focused programs has increased, however, and interest in project webs is also growing. A fundamental barrier to increased use of IT is the cost of investment, with several respondents commenting that this is due to the staff time and disruption involved and not simply the financial cost of the hardware and software required.

Keywords: survey, IT barometer, computer use, New Zealand

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Full text: content.pdf (239,646 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2010 (browse)
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