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L Simonian, N Goodell

ENERGY INFORMATION SYSTEM DASHBOARD INTEGRATING WIRELESS SENSING DEVICES WITH WIRED METERING AND CONTROLS – A CASE STUDY

Abstract: According to the most recent Annual Energy Review published by the United States Energy Information Administration, residential and commercial buildings are responsible for 40% of the energy consumed in the United States, 66% of the electricity use, and 39% of the carbon-related emissions (EIA - U.S. Department Of Energy 2009). The current emphasis is to design and construct energy efficient buildings that use 70 percent less energy (than today’s average building) by 2030, and to achieve zero net energy by supplying the remaining energy from clean and renewable resources (U.S. Department of Energy 2007). An Energy Information System (EIS) is an essential informational link towards realizing this goal. This case study exams a facility where several (wired and wireless) data acquisition systems gather energy and thermal comfort data in an institutional office building occupied predominantly by research scientists and support staff, and these systems are integrated into a single EIS. The EIS includes graphical reporting features to convey building information to operators, managers, owners, occupants and facilities personnel who have the capability to act upon the information to impact energy efficiency and comfort in the building. As EISs are still a new field, it is important to identify what needs to be done in the future to ensure their usefulness as a tool to improve energy efficiency and occupant comfort in buildings. They are an essential step on the road to achieving buildings that use zero net energy.

Keywords: Energy Information System (EIS), Wireless Sensing Network, HVAC, Energy Use

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Full text: content.pdf (933,867 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2011 (browse)
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Li Y, Wang S Q

A framework for evaluating it benefits in construction companies

Abstract: Information Technology (IT) is seen as an enabling mechanism to allow radical change to be effected in construction industry. However, firms in the construction industry are slowly responding and adapting to developments in information and communication technologies (Love, et al., 2000). A key barrier to the more effective exploitation and application of IT in the construction sector has been the lack of investment on a scale comparable with other sectors. A primary reason cited for the low level of investment is the low level of perceived benefits from IT investments amongst construction business managers (Andresen, et al., 2000). Based on literature review and a survey in the local construction companies, this paper presents a “5Cs” evaluation framework to assist construction companies to predict, measure and evaluate the potential benefits that can or should be achieved by the introduction of IT. The proposed framework answers questions concerning about all factors that need to be considered in the evaluation, such as why, what, when, who and how to perform the evaluation. It is not only presented as a research result but also can be used as a guideline in practice.

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Full text: content.pdf (248,235 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2003 (browse)
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Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by the University of Auckland. The assistance of the editor who provided the full texts and the structured metadata, Dr. Robert Amor, is gratefully appreciated.


Lindfors, Christian

PROCESS ORIENTED INFORMATION MANAGEMENT IN CONSTRUCTION

Abstract: The construction industry is often accused of being fragmented and inefficient in nature due to the lack of continuity and repetitive behaviour in projects. For many years information technology has been put forward as a solution. But, despite the potentials, little gains have been harvested by the development of computerised information systems (IS). The overall aim of this research is to determine if a more accessible and clearly described housing development process could be enabled by an information system, which in itself, could improve both individual and project (group) performance. Two research questions are being put forward; first, will a process-oriented IS positively impact on the performance of project managers and in particular on the performance of project groups? Second, how important is a process-oriented information management process for the success of the IS? To answer these questions an action research approach with large influences of survey research has been adopted. The research consists of two phases; a process orientation within a large Swedish housing development company and a survey of project managersˇ¦ attitudes towards a new process-oriented IS also including a study of dependencies found among variables of information system success (ISS). To enable a verification of the success of the IS an assessment instrument - hypothesis model - for evaluating ISS was developed. The assessment instrument was built on DeLone and McLean's (1992) ISS model and extended to include measures of information management process quality (process quality). The hypothesis model was then tested empirically with a questionnaire survey. A statistical test was also performed to test the hypothesised relationships of the augmented ISS model. In summarising the findings of the data analysis, it is evident that the new IS received unexpected support from the respondents. The findings also indicate that the collected and analysed data show support for numerous of the hypothesised relationships of ISS. Conclusions are drawn that confirm the presence of a process quality measure for assessing ISS. From a practitioner's perspective, this research suggests a course of action for process oriented organisational development. It also indicates beneficiary use of a process focus in IS development.

Keywords: Process orientation, information system, information management, construction management

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Full text: http://www.lib.kth.se/Fulltext/lindfors031114.pdf (available to registered users only)

Series: other (browse)
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Love P E D, Iriani Z, Li H, Cheng E W L

Determining the indirect costs and benefits of IT in construction firms

Abstract: Many construction companies are increasing their expenditure on Information Technology (IT) to obtain or even sustain a competitive advantage in their respective marketplaces. However, managers are often left with the quandary of how to evaluate investments in IT. Reasons of this difficulty has been suggested in the normative literature centring around the socio-technical (human and organisational) dimensions associated with IT deployment. The inability of managers to determine the true costs of deploying IT are considered attributable to a lack of knowledge and understanding of IT related costs. In developing a broader picture of such costs and their respective taxonomies, the research presented in this paper uses a structured case method to gain an understanding of how a construction firm embraced the IT evaluation process. A critical review of the IT evaluation literature is presented and a conceptual framework (CF) for IT evaluation is proposed. Findings from the case study are presented and discussed in the context of the CF.

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Full text: content.pdf (237,681 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2000 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.economic (0.016141) class.bestPractise (0.003705) class.store (0.003550)
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Permission to reproduce these documents have been graciously provided by Icelandic Building Research Institute. The assistance of the editor, Mr. Gudni Gudnason, is gratefully appreciated


M. J. Clayton & O. O. Ozener & C. A. Nome

BIM to CAFM: An Investigation of Adapting a Building Information Model to a Legacy Computer Aided Facility Management

Abstract: An investigation has been conducted to explore the steps required to move information from a Building Information Model (BIM) to a Computer Aided Facilities Management System (CAFM). The growing popularity of BIM draws heavily upon a perception that the technology can facilitate all major operations during the building lifecycle. Current deployment of BIM in the AEC/FM industry has significant impact on the acceleration of design and construction phases. Of equal importance, however, is whether BIM can pro-vide information for reuse in facility management and operations. This paper presents a research study in or-der to determine how to capture information about existing buildings in a BIM and reuse the information to support decisions about facility use. Our study includes findings from focus groups and in-depth interviews with facility managers and owners which produced well-reasoned arguments about deployment, challenges and obstacles of BIM utilization for the FM operations. Based on the findings, a BIM utilization framework was developed for FM. A link was established between BIM tools and an in-house CAFM system that con-sists of databases accessible through Web sites and incorporating pixel-oriented images and Web-enabled vector drawings. Four buildings supporting a college of architecture on a large university campus are incorpo-rated into the system. The investigation revealed that the BIM can provide much information for use in the CAFM system, but there remains a need for intermediate CAD products and additional tools.

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Full text: content.pdf (686,652 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2009 (browse)
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Marasini R, Dawood N

Stockyard layout management for precast concrete products using simulation

Abstract: Stockyard layout management for the efficient storage and retrieval of standard concrete building products offers a complex problem. The demand is seasonal, and massive stock is built in winter for the dispatched in summer. The problem is unique to the industry as the products are heavy in weight, different handling requirements and, large scale production (1000~2000 different products). The industry is suffering from long throughput time for the distribution lorries, space congestion for both storage and dispatch of products. A case study shows that an the throughput time to service an order varies form 60 to 90 minutes, the queuing time for the lorries being 1.5 times more time the time for loading. A simulation model has been developed to assist managers in designing and managing the stockyard layout. Through the simulation model "what- if " analysis can be made for different storage methods, different loading policies and vehicle routings through the yard. Visualising the loading and dispatch process, and evaluating the throughput time, space utilisation and cost of loading and dispatch, a satisfactory layout can be selected for the implementation. This paper presents the simulation model developed using ARENA (SIMAN), the methodology to derive inputs to the simulation model and the results of the simulation model using a detailed case study.

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Full text: content.pdf (233,728 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2001 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.economic (0.014268) class.impact (0.011126) class.retrieve (0.005022)
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Permission to reproduce these documents have been graciously provided by CSIR Building and Construction Technology. The assistance of the editors, Mr. Gustav Coetzee and Mr. Frances Boshoff, is gratefully appreciated.


Mathur K

Information-based representation paradigm

Abstract: This paper presents an "information-based representation paradigm". The objectives of this modelling paradigm are based on the premise that: Process is inseparable from the product; Information is collected and captured from the very early stages in the procurement process, including the design brief (program). Many early decisions and design intentions must be captured and made known to the future managers of the facility; It is imperative that we addresses the issues of buildability and building quality (performance and its measurement); A building is considered as an organic growth process: information thus grows as the product develops from its embryonic stages, to full growth, to adaptive re-use, and to decay; and Information modelling is 'continuous' over the building life cycle: not piece-meal to address the various disparate requirements.

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Full text: content.pdf (872,573 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:1995 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.processing (0.011997) class.roadmaps (0.010505) class.software development (0.009651)
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Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by the Stanford University, USA. The support of the editors, particularly Prof. Fischer is gratefully appreciated.


McGeorge W D, Chen S E, Ostwald M J

A dynamic framework for project decision the management of construction projects. support - developing "soft" interfaces for

Abstract: Construction is an information intensive industry involving many different participants (or actors). The fragmentation of functions and barriers to the effective communication of information from amongst participants has been a major obstacle to productivity and quality in the industry. The development of computer technology offers the technical means to improve the integration between different participants and functions. The paper describes a dynamic framework for project decision support which take into account the participants and the stages of the project life cycle. This conceptual framework has been adopted in formulating a strategic approach in managing project buildability, and is being extended into post occupancy functions. An essential part of the strategy is the development of user-oriented interfaces linking managers and decision makers to an arsenal of relevant technology which remains largely invisible. This approach emphasises the development of "soft" technology which takes into account management needs generated by the project process. Project participants and decisions makers are thus able to directly exploit the potential of computer- based integration of project information while maintaining their own specialist roles and functions.

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Full text: content.pdf (1,268,168 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:1994 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.processing (0.079625) class.man-software (0.026207) class.strategies (0.025189)
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Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by VTT, Espoo, Finland.


Mokhtar A, Bédard C, Fazio P

A methodology for dynamically assembling andmodifying an active-repository building database

Abstract: An information model has been developed at the Centre for Building Studies, ConcordiaUniversity to facilitate the management of design changes through inter-disciplinarycoordination. The main component in the information model is a central project databasethat can be characterized as an active repository of building components data. The data inthis active repository communicate design changes among affected disciplines and helpensure compatibility of design information. Because buildings are generally unique, a fixeddata structure for building components in such an active repository is impractical. Thispaper proposes a methodology that enables managers of multi-disciplinary design teams todynamically and transparently assemble and modify the data structure for the activerepository of building components in such a way as to suit a variety of specific buildingdesign configurations. The methodology relies on combining some of the capabilities ofthe object-oriented technology with the flexibility of the relational database technology. Toenable the implementation of such a combination, the project database is divided intobuilding components data part and a management data part. The management data allowsthe model to take advantage of SQL capabilities in controlling the data structure ofbuilding components. Design managers are also given the option to assemble the datastructure from reusable elements that contain both the building components attributes andthe rules that are necessary for managing design changes. These reusable elements aregathered into three levels of increasing complexity: components, systems, andconfigurations. Such organization greatly facilitates the structuring of the project databaseand increases the reusability of elements. The paper details the methodology anddemonstrates its use with a simple example.

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Full text: content.pdf (378,122 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:1997 (browse)
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Motawa I A, Price A, and Sher W

A fuzzy approach for evaluating the iterated implementation of innovations in construction

Abstract: A fundamental challenge of implementing construction innovations is the planning and control of work. Most innovative projects do not fulfil their time and/or cost. Evaluation of innovation performance is not often simulated within existing innovation process models. Such an evaluation enables managers to accept new processes/ products or iterate the implementation process to achieve satisfactory performance. This paper introduces a conceptual model that deals with the effectiveness of the innovation implementation phase. This model adopts the Dependency Structure Matrix (DSM) tool to simulate the iterated implementation of an innovation. The model uses influence information, and managerial and technological performance to control and simulate the implementation of innovations by their nature of experimentation, iteration and refinement. The paper presents a fuzzy logic approach to identify the required classification of interdependencies among iterated tasks within the DSM. Analysis of the model resulted in the implementation of innovations being programmed more effectively.

Keywords: construction innovations, dependency structure matrix, fuzzy logic, planning techniques

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Series: itaec:2003 (browse)
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