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Weener R J

"The concept of hierarchical levels; an overall concept for a full automatic concrete design including the education of concrete. The case MatrixFrame? versus EuroCadCrete."

Abstract: "1. The exception proves the rule; Knowledge Based Automatic Concrete Design From the early 80 till the second half of 1990 the software Matrix developed for structural engineers was based on the MsDOS platform. In those years the codechecking distinguished itself by an extremely enforced integrated approach. A complete structural design including the generation of drawings could be realized at once, with one press on the button. In this concept there was no room for the intervening interaction of civil engineers. They had little or no influence on unforeseen situations or shortcomings in the automatic analysis of boundary conditions or the automatic design. The fact that we were secured of the cooperation of civil engineers (experts) concerning improvements makes it possible for us to make our knowledge based system even more complete. 2. The exception becomes the rule; Interactive Concrete Engineering A disadvantage of a full automatic structural design is the existence of exceptional cases. Every case needs to be programmed which leads to a huge programming effort. In order to complete the last 20% you need a programming effort of 80% of the total period. Another disadvantage is the different approach by the government for using software for code checking. The new Windows software is based on a structure very close related to the level of code checking. All the relevant parameters can be manipulated. The link to the code is absolutely clear by the visualization of the applied code article as well as the provided value and the required value. 3. The 80-20 rule; The concept of hierarchical levels 80% of his time a civil engineer is using only 20% of the functionality of his software for structural analysis. A program doesn’t need to be too complex for daily use. When you think in different levels you can manage the 80% for daily use, as well as the 20% for the advanced topics in 1 program. The computer, using generative processes, without intervening interactions can work out 80% of all calculations. When you think in levels it is possible to work out the other 20% by the same program. 4. Ruling by exception; Computer Aided Learning system 10 years ago the TU-Delft developed a CAD exercise. During this period more than 1500 students used these exercises for their training. This CAD exercise was developed in order to support students in dimensioning, analyzing and detailing concrete structures, after the introductory lecture in designing and constructing concrete in their third academic year. EUROCADCRETE is a continuation of the CAD exercise mentioned above and is based on the educational version of MatrixFrame 2D-Frame and on the experience of the TU-Delft during the lessons of the CAD Concrete exercise. Students at home can define the structural analysis part of the exercise. Then the prepared job can be worked out according to the EuroCode in the EUROCADCRETE environment. The last part of the exercise gives the student the opportunity to perform parametric studies. By means of exercises and by providing interactive tools students gain a clear insight in the nature of reinforced concrete, which is the aim of this job. A learning system like EUROCADCRETE is a combination of, on the one side, a Graphical User Interface based on the lowest level, and a check mechanism and parametric study on the other side, which is based on the advanced level within the concept of hierarchical levels."

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Full text: content.pdf (877,357 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2000 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.man-software (0.062219) class.analysis (0.050748) class.deployment (0.037199)
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Permission to reproduce these documents have been graciously provided by Icelandic Building Research Institute. The assistance of the editor, Mr. Gudni Gudnason, is gratefully appreciated


Wu W,Issa R

Integrated process mapping for bim implemenation in green building project delivery

Abstract: Professionals in the architecture, engineering and construction (AEC) industry are becoming more versed with building information modeling (BIM), and start to recognize its synergy with green building. As more owners are demanding better building performance to meet regulatory requirements, business goals or to establish a positive public image, implementing BIM in green building project delivery offers project teams the ideal leverage to meet owners’ expectations. Current Green BIM practices are immature, ad-hoc and unsystematic. The lack of an integrated process is the biggest barrier to exploring the benefits of Green BIM to their full extent. The fact that most project teams are transient in nature also makes it challenging to replicate success from one project to another. Other major obstacles reside in understanding the subtleties in differentiating the roles and responsibilities of team members, determining appropriate BIM execution strategies and standardizing information exchange (IE). Hence, the purpose of this research is to conduct a comprehensive review of existing Green BIM strategies and best practices, and to develop an Integrated Green BIM Process Map (IGBPM) to provide guidance on BIM implementation in green building project delivery. The deliverables of this research include a customized worksheet for project sustainability goals and BIM use identification, Level 1 of the IGBPM and several examples of the Level 2 process maps using LEED as a use case. The IGBPM is valuable to industry practitioners since it represents a holistic and systematic approach to efficiently utilize limited BIM resources to overcome the challenges and complexities to successfully delivering the project and achieving the targeted green certification. The structural transparency of the IGBPM also encourages risk/benefit sharing that can help enhance collaboration among team members and eventually facilitate a more integrated delivery of green building projects.

Keywords: Building information modeling,green building,process mapping,project delivery

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Series: convr:2013 (browse)
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Yang J, Edwards D, Nicholas J

A fuzzy logic decision support system for routing materials on construction sites

Abstract: The ability to accurately plan and visualise routes for materials movement on complex construction sites is a major determinate of project success (or conversely failure). However, materials routing design complexity and the bespoke nature of individual projects places a unique burden upon project planners and site managers. This paper presents a software tool, called Virtual Construction Material Router (VCMR) that can generate materials routing scenarios sequences based on: i) site layout; ii) delivery routes; iii) construction activity schedules; and iv) temporary accommodation location. The heart of the VCMR is a Geographic Information System (GIS), fuzzy logic based decision-support system, which enables planners to determine the most appropriate route for material deployment. The system also has the inherent ability to enable planners to select and visualise the most suitable material movement routes. Validity of the developed VCMR system was achieved by observing model accuracy when employed on two complex construction sites.

Keywords: materials route, decision support systems, visualisation, fuzzy logic, GIS

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Full text: content.pdf (1,238,456 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: itaec:2003 (browse)
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Z Aziz, CJ Anumba, D Ruikar, PM Carrillo & NM Bouchlaghem

Context Aware Information Delivery for On-Site Construction Operations

Abstract: The information intensive nature of construction projects requires the site personnel to have an on-demand access to project information. Current information delivery methods are primarily static and do not take into account the site personnel's changing context. Delivering information to site staff, based on their context (such as location, time and profile) has the tremendous potential to improve construction productivity. In this paper a prototype application for context-aware information delivery is discussed. The implementation is based on a Pocket-PC platform and makes use of wireless local area networking (WLAN) to capture context parameters. A semantics-based Resource Description Framework Schema (RDFS) is used for both context interpretation and to define construction documents and project task structure. Conclusions are drawn about the possible future impact of context-aware applications for the construction industry.

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Full text: content.pdf (694,920 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2005 (browse)
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Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by the Technische Universität Dresden.


Z. Ren, L. Sha, T. M. Hassan

RFID facilitated construction material management - a case study of water supply project

Abstract: Due to the complex and dynamic nature of the construction industry, construction material management faces many unique challenges from material planning, ordering, receiving and storing, handling and distribution, site usage and monitoring (Johnston and Brennan 1996). Poor material management has been identified as a major source for low construction productivity, cost overrun and delay (Fearon 1973, Olomolaiye et al. 1998). Although many fac-tors contribute to the problems of material management, the lack of active, accurate and integrated information flow from material planning, inventory to site use and monitoring is the major contributor. However, it is difficult to obtain such accurate information actively due to the nature of the industry, particularly for large or material intensive projects such as oil or water pipe-laying projects. A Radio Frequency Identification system (RFID) facilitated construction ma-terial management system has been developed to tackle this problem. This latest technology helps the project team to collect material storage and usage in an active and accurate way, and further to facilitate the information flow through the construction material management process with focus on the dynamic material planning, ordering and monitoring. The developed system is being implemented in a water-supply project.

Keywords: RFID, construction, dynamic, material planning, monitoring

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Full text: content.pdf (863,009 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2007 (browse)
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