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Haksever A M

A model to predict the occurrence of information overload of project managers

Abstract: "This paper investigates information overload of construction project managers. The aim is to identify its occurrence pattern and predict the occurrence probabilities in a given circumstance, as a project manager’s information load is inconstant in nature, fluctuating over time, changing character and source. First, a conceptual definition of information overload is developed, using time as the criterion to describe information load. Information overload for a project manager is taken as occurring when the demands on information processing time exceed the supply of time. Second, the variation of information load throughout the project is structured using the interaction of a project manager with project members through the stages of a project. These two elements are combined in a matrix format where values for information overload are ascribed to cells representing the interaction with each member during each stage of the project. Six key project members, and four project stages are defined. To allow the subjective quantification of information overload, five practical situations of real life information overload are described, of which one must be chosen for each of the twenty four stage-member cells. To test the model and calculate the probabilities of information overload, data were collected using a questionnaire survey of 140 project managers in the UK. Respondents were asked to select the relevant situation for each cell in the matrix. The resulting matrices had a weighting system applied and a mean calculated for each circumstance to create an Information Load Point (ILP), presented in an Information Load Matrix (ILM). The application of ‘Ordinal Logistic Regression’ into the ILP scores provides a predictive outcome, which gives the probabilities of a project manager being in any of the predetermined five information overload situations at any stage with any member. The detailed account of the calculations and the outcome of the analysis are presented. The results revealed that the extent and sources of information overload of construction project managers vary throughout the stages of a project. The construction stage has the highest probability of information overload, followed by the design stage. The main sources of information overload are the project participants contributing the key expertise in each stage. In the design stage, the key contributors are architects and consultants, and in the construction stage, contractors and sub-contractors. Architects’ and consultants’ contributions to information overload show a similar pattern through the project duration, as do those of contractors and sub-contractors. This is the first of its kind in construction project management and provides an invaluable source of reference and guidance on the probabilities of the occurrence of information overload in a construction project. The model predicts the situations where information overload is high, moderate, low or non-existent. It is then possible to concentrate on those overloaded areas by using the appropriate means or strategies."

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Full text: content.pdf (393,534 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2000 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.strategies (0.016354) class.man-software (0.013484) class.impact (0.012353)
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Permission to reproduce these documents have been graciously provided by Icelandic Building Research Institute. The assistance of the editor, Mr. Gudni Gudnason, is gratefully appreciated


Robert M. Leicht, Sonali Kumar, Moawia Abdelkarim, John I. Messner

Gaining End User Involvement through Virtual Reality Mock-Ups: A Medical Facility Case Study

Abstract: The use of construction mock-ups have become common practice to validate design and work throughconstructability challenges. The use of physical mock-ups offer significant benefits as a communication toolamongst the project team but must be balanced with a potentially large costs to construct. With the advent ofmany new virtual prototyping technologies, project teams now have the potential to perform mock-ups in virtualenvironments. This paper will present a case study of a 14,000 m2 (150,000 ft2) medical office constructionproject which used both physical and virtual mock-ups to allow the facility to meet end-user needs with minimalre-work during the on-site construction. The virtual mock-up was carried out using the Immersive ConstructionLab at Penn State to review a rendered model of single occurrence space in the facility. The paper willdemonstrate the end-user and construction team feedback about the virtual mock-up processes and the benefitsand challenges it presents.

Keywords: virtual mock-ups, BIM, End-user involvement, design review

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Full text: content.pdf (119,395 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2010 (browse)
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Rowlinson S, Hadikusumo B H

Virtually real construction components and processes for design-for-safety-process (DFSP)

Abstract: Interpreting bulky 2D design drawings from consultants into a 3D mental picture for construction purposes is tedious. If only visualizing a 3D mental picture of the project creates burdens to user, then he will find more problems in integrating this information with other plans such as the construction process and safety regulations. In other words, it is difficult to add more contents in the 2D design representation. Virtual Reality (VR) aims to allow the end-user to view a 3D model of a project. So, contents of the design can be added, such as construction processes and safety plans, at the virtually real project before actual construction is undertaken. This paper discusses the virtually real construction model (component and process) of the Hong Kong Housing Authority standard block, specific developed functions of the virtual reality application and the role of a Design-For-Safety-Process (DFSP) for the purpose of site safety hazards recognition and remedial measures to prevent the occurrence of accidents.

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Full text: content.pdf (260,718 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2000 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.legal (0.026103) class.represent (0.015518) class.man-software (0.007124)
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Permission to reproduce these documents have been graciously provided by Icelandic Building Research Institute. The assistance of the editor, Mr. Gudni Gudnason, is gratefully appreciated


Sinthawanarong K

Measuring construction performance using a comprehensive approach

Abstract: "This study presents an investigation and development of a construction performance measurement model. A literature review indicated that researchers have offered a variety of models in an attempt to examine construction performance but existing models may not be adequate to embrace a comprehensive measure. Literature reviews were used to develop a working structure for the development of a new conceptual model. There are generally four areas by which individual performance may best constitute overall construction effectiveness: Time, Cost, Quality and Safety. Various conceptual and application models are reviewed and their limitations are highlighted. A psychology-based measurement mechanism (ProMES) is proposed as the modelling environment. Basic components of the model were determined by questionnaire surveys and a review of literature. It was concluded that project progress variation, time delay, variances of labour and material cost, plant utilisation, quality procedure approval, non-conformance of products, and accident occurrence and investment index will be used in the evaluation model as performance indicators. To address the issues of reliability and feasibility, the model was computerised using Visual Basic on objective-hierarchical mechanisms and implemented in five participating construction sites. Results from a comparative study between the model and subjective measurement indicated that an output based on the newly developed model produces significantly better results."

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Full text: content.pdf (278,783 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2000 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.environment (0.024063) class.impact (0.023230) class.economic (0.014073)
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Permission to reproduce these documents have been graciously provided by Icelandic Building Research Institute. The assistance of the editor, Mr. Gudni Gudnason, is gratefully appreciated


Vasiliki Manioti, Athanasios Chassiakos and Stylianos Karatzas

Safety Risk Assessment in Construction Projects Using Information Models

Abstract: The identification of safety risks in construction sites has been a major concern of project managers who need to develop proactive safety plans to reduce accident and health related risks. This paper proposes a method which combines BIM technology, virtual reality tools, and Monte Carlo simulation to reveal possible accident conditions and to assess the probability of accident occurrence with the aim to promote safety management and accident reduction. Within the context of construction projects, the construction site is dynamically modelled employing BIM software. A programming language (Visual C #) is used to represent the human/machinery movements in the virtual environment. Finally, Monte Carlo simulation is performed to analyse specific work scenarios which may lead to hazardous conditions and assess the safety level. The aim is to link the risk output with the BIM model and to develop a heat map of accident risk throughout the project allowing, thus, prompt and effective implementation of preventive measures for accident reduction or avoidance.

Keywords: Safety, Risk Assessment, BIM, Virtual Reality, Simulation

DOI: https://doi.org/10.24928/JC3-2017/0229

Full text: content.pdf (1,121,120 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: jc3:2017 (browse)
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