Welcome
Digital library of construction informatics
and information technology in civil engineering and construction
 

Works 

Search Results

Facilitated by the SciX project

Hits 1 to 4 of 4

A den Otter, H Jan Pels, I Iliescu

BIM VERSUS PLM: RISKS AND BENEFITS

Abstract: Applying Building Information Modeling (BIM) is a hot issue. The Building industry feels the urge to use it, but at the same time companies see huge risks, since the ownership and control of information becomes unclear when all building information is put together in one model. Also the cost and the benefits do not always land at the same place. To that account three Dutch firms operating in multi- disciplinary building & construction projects asked the authors to execute a research and design project how to solve this problem. As a result a framework for assessing risks was developed for setting up a successful BIM process. It seems the manufacturing industry is much ahead of the Building industry in using these concepts and technology, be it under the name of Product Lifecycle Management. However, comparing the approaches in the Building industry and manufacturing industry shows that, while construction is primarily interested in the risks, manufacturing is primarilyu focussed on the benefits. The paper tries to explain this difference and concludes with some suggestions to reduce risk and enhance the benefits of BIM for construction companies.

Keywords: Data collection, Product Lifecycle management, Building Information Modeling and Data storage.

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf (473,694 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2011 (browse)
Cluster:
Class:
Similar papers:
Sound: N/A.


Markus Schorr, Andre Borrmann, Cornelia Klaubert, Yang Ji, Willibald Gunthner, Ernst Rank

A Product Lifecycle Management Approach for Civil Engineering Projects

Abstract: Product Lifecycle Management (PLM) is a strategic concept to develop, manage and keep control of industrial products over their entire lifecycle. The concept comprises IT-systems as well as methods, business processes and organizational structures (Arnold, 2005). The most essential component for a PLM implementation is product data management (PDM) systems that administrate all the data from initial ideas, drafts and drawings to information on the manufacture and maintenance on a central storage platform (Stark, 2005). Compared to document management systems, PDM systems provide part-oriented functions required for linking components, corresponding 3D models and drawings as well as any other related documents in a clearly arranged pattern. In addition, they also provide a convenient means of transferring and incorporating data from CAD-systems into the central storage platform. Combined with cleverly devised access rights management and an integrated workflow engine, PDM systems appear to be a good information management solution in civil engineering projects.Since those systems are designed to serve in-house information management procedures in the mechanical engineering industry, however, they have not been used for civil engineering projects so far (Borrmann, 2009). This is due to the fact that special requirements needed in construction projects have not been fulfilled yet. This paper describes both the concept and the implementation of a PDM system customized to manage data arising in civil engineering projects. As well as discussing specific requirements, it also introduces the implementation of necessary adjustments and several add-ons are presented. Thus the paper shows how an adapted PDM system originally developed for the mechanical engineering industry enables a company-wide component-oriented management of all relevant data over the entire lifecycle of a building. Beyond that, today’s inadequacies and missing features for using PDM systems in civil engineering projects are described.

Keywords: Building Lifecycle Management, Product Data Management, Document Management, Data Acquisition and Storage, Information and Knowledge Management

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf (332,442 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2010 (browse)
Cluster:
Class:
Similar papers:
Sound: N/A.


R Reefman, S Van Nederveen

A controlled Integral Product Model (IPM) in Building and Construction

Abstract: Significant improvements within Building and Construction projects are expected from the application of the Building Information Model, BIM. A major cause of failure costs is the use of invalid or wrong documents / models in the process. This means when BIM is the central data source in the project it should be up to date at any moment in time.Today the BIM model is often one huge single file, usually a merger of two or more files created by different disciplines, for example the model of the architect and the model of HVAC project partner. A BIM file is very often released as one object which indicates a bad controlled process because the Building Information Model is a collection of many objects each having its own life cycle. The use of the building information model BIM is still restricted to a few areas. A major application of the BIM model today is the use of its geometry model. This is used as a verification tool, e.g. interference checking. The Integrated Product Model (IPM®) concept places a well managed digital product model in the centre of the design and engineering process in which all engineers at different disciplines and locations are working together. Well managed means that there are appropriate release and change processes in place. The paper discusses an integrated design and engineering environment using the IPM-concept and applying modern configuration management concepts to assure actual and good documents or models all the time. An example is given how Product Lifecycle Management (PLM) systems are used to deliver good document / models to the BIM model. The paper concludes that BIM should be more integrated in the design and engineering process and eventually needs to be integrated in a PLM environment.

Keywords: Configuration Management, Building Information Modelling, Integrated Product Model, Product Lifecycle Management

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf (670,884 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2011 (browse)
Cluster:
Class:
Similar papers:
Sound: N/A.


V Tarandi

The BIM Collaboration Hub – A model server based on IFC and PLCS for Virtual Enterprise Collaboration

Abstract: For a long lasting effort and collaboration among several actors, there is a need for integration and consolidation of the building information in a common information hub, a model server. A standardized exchange format, like IFC today, in its own is not enough. If the standardized format is only used in point to point exchange situations, the project and building information will not be integrated neither consolidated.The IFC standard can manage snap-shots of the information, but to manage the whole life cycle, there is a need for a standard like PLCS, Product Life Cycle Support, ISO 10303-239, www.plcs-resources.org, which supports some critical business needs faced by companies as they seek to implement Product Lifecycle Management (PLM) and other broad enterprise-based initiatives. The model servers shall secure collaboration both within an organization as well as throughout an extended enterprise and its various participants. One implementation of an open BIM based model server is the BIM Collaboration Hub based on the model server Share-A-space from Eurostep. The BIM Collaboration Hub was the foundation for the web-based Open ICT Platform in InPro, a 4 year European R&D project which finished in November 2010.At its core, Share-A-space is a standards-based data consolidation and exchange solution. It is built on PLCS, a standard which promises to become a key enabler for process improvements in several service-focused industries such as aerospace and defense.This paper presents the BIM Collaboration Hub, the technologies and how it was used as the web-based Open ICT platform in the InPro project. It presents the next paradigm in virtual collaboration in construction, where the full lifecycle is supported. The discipline specific definitions of objects and relations of the IFC standard are put into this framework and related to the extended functionality of PLCS.

Keywords: IFC, Collaboration, Model Server, PLCS, BIM Collaboration Hub

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf (987,665 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2011 (browse)
Cluster:
Class:
Similar papers:
Sound: N/A.


No more hits.

 

hosted by University of Ljubljana



includes

W78




© itc.scix.net 2003
Home page of this database login Powered by SciX Open Publishing Services 1.002 February 16, 2003