Welcome
Digital library of construction informatics
and information technology in civil engineering and construction
 

Works 

Search Results

Facilitated by the SciX project

Hits 1 to 10 of 11

Ageliki Valavanoglou, Danijel Rebolj and Detlef Heck

Construction Delay and Disruption Claims Assisted Through BIM Technology

Abstract: Construction projects are frequently subjected to delay and disruption leading to dispute between project participants regarding the entitlement to compensation. Challenges associated with the analysis of delay and disruption and the subsequent preparation of the claim conducted by a forensic analysis expert include the difficult retrieval of scattered, unstructured information and lack of adequate documentation, leading to weak analysis and therefore insufficient proof of causation and entitlement.This paper illustrates the chronological information generation regarding delay and disruption in the construction phase proposing a framework based on Building Information Modelling and structured information integration, to facilitate easy filing and retrieval of relevant documentation for claim preparation.

Keywords: Delay and Disruption Claims, Documentation, Forensic Analysis, Building Information Modelling, BIM Collaboration Format

DOI: https://doi.org/10.24928/JC3-2017/0192

Full text: content.pdf (2,026,714 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: jc3:2017 (browse)
Cluster:
Class:
Similar papers:
Sound: N/A.


Aleš Mrkela & Danijel Rebolj

Automated construction schedule creation using project information model

Abstract: In this paper we will propose a method of using a project information model (PIM) for creating construction schedules. In the paper we will briefly review current available scheduling possibilities, which use combination of BIM and scheduling software. We realized that BIM lacks user specific data that is vital for proper schedule creation and has, on the other hand, too complex structure and software tools for planning personnel to understand. Through the use of simple 3D model viewer, user specific data and BIM, we are proposing a novel approach of schedule estimation in construction, which we call project information model (PIM). PIM is the process that is based on internal logics, that creates the estimated schedule and resource usage. After the PIM process, the automatically created schedule is included in BIM and made available to project managers and other construction stakeholders, to coordinate and carry out activities.

Keywords:

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf (279,466 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2009 (browse)
Cluster:
Class:
Similar papers:
Sound: N/A.


Alvise Simondetti

Designer’s toolkit 2020: a vision for the practice

Abstract: Designer’s toolkit is rapidly changing and design practices need a shared vision of what the short, me-dium and long term might be. With this in mind we interviewed twenty-four thought leaders in the design community worldwide. Four big ideas emerged from the interviews: transferring technologies from other industries has provided great bene-fits, but it has also generated the need to transfer processes; changes in the way we build drives changes in the de-signer’s desktop, including the representations that designers use to communicate; greater gains are achieved by focus-sing on the interplay of specialised algorithms; “just on time” design data improves design. Four possible contexts for the designer’s toolkit are described: the proprietor aimed at increasing productivity, the open-source aimed at increasing IT driven creativity, either more or less engaged with fabrication. Finally, the paper concludes by proposing what designers ought to be doing today. Actions include educating specialist toolmakers, custodian and math modellers; integrating computer controlled machine workshops into designers’ project spaces; the automation of repetitive design tasks; supporting communities around software tools and store project data according to geospatial co-ordinates.

Keywords: Design community, technology transfer, process transfer, designer's desktop, representation, communication

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf (451,568 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2007 (browse)
Cluster:
Class:
Similar papers:
Sound: N/A.


Howard R

Classification of building information – European and IT systems

Abstract: Introduction Organisation of the information needed to design, construct and manage a building is still based upon traditional trades and classification tables. European countries have established sources of information: specifications, element tables and product databases, based on categories, such as SfB, defined 50 years ago. The Danish Centrecontract on Building Classification is following projects in several other countries, to update its systems, provide greater integration of data, and keep up with new information technologies. This paper presents experience from studying developments in several countries, relating them to the needs of Denmark, and anticipating the future demands of IT. IT context The possibilities with IT for more flexible searches on advanced representations of building entities require fundamental changes in integrating, exchanging and accessing information. There is a proliferation of web portals and project webs, and some common structure that relates to international practice is needed. Methods of searching are changing from traditional categories to full text and structured keywords. New methods of representing building data such as the IFCs and XML are having a major influence alongside standards for building data. The Centrecontract is relating these to the current practice in many types of firm in the Danish building industry. Objectives The Centrecontract is due for completion in 2002 but the research being carried out by DTU will be presented at the end of 2000 and 2001. The broad objectives are for the partners to develop tools for building elements, schedules of rates and product classification, within a common framework, and to promote these and provide education. The research has defined the needs of Danish industry, is learning from experience in other countries, and will predict the likely influence of IT developments in future. This paper reports on some of the information systems being developed in other countries. Methodology The approach taken was to talk to experts rather than to collect new statistical information. In each country at least one developer of new information systems was interviewed, one researcher and one user organisation. They were asked about the systems currently used in their country, new systems being developed, and any experience of their use. They were also asked about how changes had been, or could be, made in the general organisation of information about building. Relevant standards and the many building information services on the Web were also studied to find the common elements, and see how Denmark could develop systems to suit local needs. Some preliminary findings Factors from Denmark include the need to link to the familiar SfB system, using the same structure right through the process, the importance of the client and resistance to standards. Other countries studied so far are developing improved systems, with Sweden leading the way with BSAB 96, the UK with Uniclass to unite its different classification systems, and Holland and Norway proposing Lexicon and BARBI respectively. Common factors are the list of tables defined in ISO 12006-2, the work of EPIC in product classification, the influence of the IFCs and the use of the Web and XML. This work will be completed at the end of 2000 and recommendations made to the other partners in the Centrecontract for the systems that will help meet the needs of the Danish building industry.

Keywords:

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf (872,669 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2001 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.collaboration (0.092484) class.represent (0.059640) class.standards (0.053428)
Similar papers:
Sound: read aloud.

Permission to reproduce these documents have been graciously provided by CSIR Building and Construction Technology. The assistance of the editors, Mr. Gustav Coetzee and Mr. Frances Boshoff, is gratefully appreciated.


Jin Zhu, Ali Mostafavi and Jennifer Whyte

Towards Systems Integration Theory in Megaprojects: A System-of-Systems Framework

Abstract: Megaprojects are large-scale, complex projects composed of various interconnected constituents. Recent research suggests that effective systems integration is one of the major challenges affecting the success of their delivery and that we hence need new taxonomies to characterise and evaluate integration in this context. This paper draws on and contributes to a growing literature on systems integration in megaprojects by proposing a formalized framework for characterization and evaluation of integration between constituents of megaprojects. In this study, megaprojects are conceptualized as systems-of-systems (SoSs). Based on this conceptualization, a SoS framework towards a systems integration theory in megaproject SoSs is proposed. The proposed framework includes two aspects. The first articulates the different dimensions of systems integration. It identifies the types of integration; focuses of integration; integration at different levels; and integration in different phases in megaproject SoSs. The second aspect is related to the indicators of systems integration. Seven indicators are discussed for evaluating the degree of integration in megaprojects. The proposed SoS framework provides a theoretical basis for future research on systems integration in megaprojects and can be used as a guide for developing corresponding empirical studies.

Keywords: Megaprojects, Systems Integration, System-Of-Systems

DOI: https://doi.org/10.24928/JC3-2017/0251

Full text: content.pdf (533,860 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: jc3:2017 (browse)
Cluster:
Class:
Similar papers:
Sound: N/A.


Mads Holten Rasmussen, Pieter Pauwels, Christian Anker Hviid and Jan Karlshøj

Proposing a Central AEC Ontology That Allows for Domain Specific Extensions

Abstract: In the last years, several ontologies focused on structuring domain specific information within the scope of Architecture, Engineering and Construction (AEC) have emerged. Several of these individual ontologies redefine core concepts of a building already specified in the publicly available ontology version of the ISO standardised Industry Foundation Classes (IFC) schema, thereby violating the W3C best practice rule of minimum redundancy. The voluminous IFC schema with origins in a closed world assumption is likewise violating this rule by redefining concepts about time, location, units etc. already available from other sources, and it is furthermore violating the rule of keeping ontologies simple for easy maintenance. Based on all the available ontologies, we propose a simple Building Topology Ontology (BOT) only covering the core concepts of a building, and three methods for extending this with domain specific ontologies. This approach makes it (1) possible to work with a limited set of core building classes, and (2) extend those as needed towards specific domain ontologies that are in hands of business professionals or domain-specific standardisation bodies, such as the European Telecommunications Standards Institute (ETSI), buildingSMART, the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC), and so forth.

Keywords: Linked Data, Building Information Modelling, Web of Data, Building Topology Ontology

DOI: https://doi.org/10.24928/JC3-2017/0153

Full text: content.pdf (565,319 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: jc3:2017 (browse)
Cluster:
Class:
Similar papers:
Sound: N/A.


Schaap I H

VISI: a methodology to standardise communications in civil engineering

Abstract: Parties collaborating on infrastructure projects in the civil engineering industry have expressed theirneed to use common starting points for information transfer and communication. The VISI projectexamined what type of starting points are required for the design and construction of infrastructure,proposing a framework of agreements that is based on the DEMO organisational theory. Theframework describes the process on the dividing lines of identified roles. The responsibilities ofeach role are determined, including the required communication. The framework was elaborated forthe following fields of application: design, contracting, and testing/acceptance. The result iscurrently being tested in the sector, and the first results of the trial demonstrate that the frameworkoffers effective support for organising the collaboration and specifying the communication structure.

Keywords:

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf (205,396 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: ecce:2001 (browse)
Cluster:
Class:
Similar papers:
Sound: read aloud.


SG Yeomans, NM Bouchlaghem & A El-Hamalawi

Provisions for proficient Construction Project Extranet Protocols to facilitate Collaborative Extranet Working

Abstract: Construction teams within the industry are recurrently adopting Construction Project Extranet (CPE) systems to facilitate project integration and collaboration. When deciding to adopt a CPE, it is important to support their use with a clearly defined Construction Project Extranet Protocol (CPEP). Prior investigations found that the principal cause of their inefficient use was associated with missing, or poorly developed protocols. Project teams also cited the lack of a generic industry standard as the main reason for not being able to produce practicable CPEPs. This paper reports on the findings of a study, to establish the main requirements for development of a proficient CPEP and investigate the need for a generic toolkit to aid project teams. It identifies the key issues to be considered, along with the findings of a survey on current CPEPs. The paper concludes by proposing a set of recommendations for improving the way in which CPEP are produced.

Keywords:

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf (359,067 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2005 (browse)
Cluster:
Class:
Similar papers:
Sound: N/A.

Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by the Technische Universität Dresden.


Shiva (Vahideh) Aram, Charles Eastman, Rafael Sacks, Ivan Panushev

Introducing a New Methodology to Develop the Information Delivery Manual for AEC Projects

Abstract: The Industry Foundation Classes (IFC) create a neutral environment for interoperability by providing a comprehensive specification of the information throughout the AEC/FM project lifecycle, globally, across disciplines and software applications. However, IFC schema does not capture the ways in which information is created and shared by practitioners. And lack of defining specific exchange requirements for users in IFC schema has made it difficult to implement IFC compliant software solutions. The Information Delivery Manual (IDM) responds to these problems by proposing a methodology that captures business processes in AEC/FM projects and provides detailed user information exchange requirements specifications. To reach these goals the IDMs involve industry experts to capture their knowledge and industry best practices. In this paper, we propose a progressive method to develop IDMs. In this method Exchange Models (EMs) are utilized to provide the content of information exchanges between users and/or software applications. Exchange Objects (EOs) are introduced as the fundamental elements in an exchange model, which contain the description of information items in non-technical terms that require to be exchanged in an exchange model. EOs are then further developed to provide the detailed technical attributes of the information categories in exchange models. EOs may participate in several exchange requirements. Therefore, they are defined to be reusable within many exchange models. The level of detail and precision, and the representation type of EOs may vary in exchange models in different stages of the project lifecycle and are determined based on the business rules and with participation of industry experts. The details of the information capture to develop the IDM such that the IFC schema can be applied in national, local or even project contexts are further illustrated. The paper finally presents the application of the introduced approach, using the examples of architectural and structural precast concrete as a test base.

Keywords: Industry Foundation Classes (IFC), Information Delivery Manual (IDM), Model View Definitions (MVDs), Interoperability, Building Information Modeling (BIM)

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf (362,236 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2010 (browse)
Cluster:
Class:
Similar papers:
Sound: N/A.


Weippert A, Kajewski S L, Tilley P A

Online remote construction management (ORCM)

Abstract: In an attempt to bring the unique talents of various construction industry project participants together in a more productive and integrated manner, the Online Remote Construction Management (ORCM) project commenced in July 1999 proposing to test, field trial and/or evaluate online information and communication systems on up to five case study projects. This paper outlines two years of ORCM research, surveying and benchmarking activities on one of the five ORCM case study projects and concludes with five 'Critical Success Factors' that would help ensure successful implementation of information and communication technology (ICT) tools and/or Internet-based construction project management (ICPM) communication systems and/or processes on geographically dispersed (remote) civil and building construction projects.

Keywords:

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf (99,491 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2002 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.collaboration (0.027786) class.communication (0.025405) class.social (0.017450)
Similar papers:
Sound: read aloud.

Permission to reproduce these documents have been graciously provided by the Aarhus School of Architecture, Denmark. The assistnace of the editor, Prof. Kristian Agger, is gratefully aprecciated.


For more results click below:

 

hosted by University of Ljubljana



includes

W78




© itc.scix.net 2003
this is page 1 show page 2 Home page of this database login Powered by SciX Open Publishing Services 1.002 February 16, 2003