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A Grilo,A Zutshi, R Jardim-Goncalves

BUSINESS INTEROPERABILITY IN THE CONTEXT OF BIM-BASED PROJECTS

Abstract: This paper proposes a model that closely captures the factors that are responsible for Business Interoperability in the context of collaborative business processes for the deployment of Building Information Modeling. The Business Interoperability Quotient Measurement Model (BIQMM), uses an interdisciplinary approach to capture the key elements responsible for collaboration performance and BIM platform configuration. Through the quantification of the relevance of each element to the particular collaboration scenario, and with the combination of the BIQMM with a multi-criteria decision making tool, the Analytical Network Process (ANP) approach, this model enables a quantitative analysis of Business Interoperability for BIM-based projects, so that an overall interoperability score can be calculated for enhanced performance measurements. An application scenario is presented and the application of the BIQMM and ANP, provides a comprehensive framework for interoperability measurement. The paper concludes by recognizing that relationships between business interoperability and true AEC performance improvements and subsequent economic benefits derived from BIM-based approaches needs to be further developed.

Keywords: Business Interoperability, BIM; Collaborative Working Environments

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Series: w78:2011 (browse)
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Bowen, P.A., Taylor, R.G. and Edwards, P.J.

Expert Systems - A Paradigm Shift in the Quantification of Uncertainty in Decision-making for Construction Projects

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Series: w78:1986 (browse)
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Chandansingh R A, Vos CH J

Modelling the effects of information technology on construction

Abstract: Quantitative statements on effects of IT are needed desperately to manage IT in construction, but are hard to make. This paper describes an approach to model the effects of IT on construction, based on the work of Mowshowitz (1992a-c). This approach makes use of graph theory to build a formal model of the construction process which allows for investigation and quantification of the effects of IT on construction. The approach is presently being used to model the cost-effects of CAD systems in concrete construction.

Keywords: IT; production digraph; information commodity; CAD; value; concrete construction

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Full text: content.pdf (576,950 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:1993 (browse)
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Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by the National University of Singapore. The assistance of the editors, particularly Prof. Martin Betts, is gratefully appreciated.


Haksever A M

A model to predict the occurrence of information overload of project managers

Abstract: "This paper investigates information overload of construction project managers. The aim is to identify its occurrence pattern and predict the occurrence probabilities in a given circumstance, as a project manager’s information load is inconstant in nature, fluctuating over time, changing character and source. First, a conceptual definition of information overload is developed, using time as the criterion to describe information load. Information overload for a project manager is taken as occurring when the demands on information processing time exceed the supply of time. Second, the variation of information load throughout the project is structured using the interaction of a project manager with project members through the stages of a project. These two elements are combined in a matrix format where values for information overload are ascribed to cells representing the interaction with each member during each stage of the project. Six key project members, and four project stages are defined. To allow the subjective quantification of information overload, five practical situations of real life information overload are described, of which one must be chosen for each of the twenty four stage-member cells. To test the model and calculate the probabilities of information overload, data were collected using a questionnaire survey of 140 project managers in the UK. Respondents were asked to select the relevant situation for each cell in the matrix. The resulting matrices had a weighting system applied and a mean calculated for each circumstance to create an Information Load Point (ILP), presented in an Information Load Matrix (ILM). The application of ‘Ordinal Logistic Regression’ into the ILP scores provides a predictive outcome, which gives the probabilities of a project manager being in any of the predetermined five information overload situations at any stage with any member. The detailed account of the calculations and the outcome of the analysis are presented. The results revealed that the extent and sources of information overload of construction project managers vary throughout the stages of a project. The construction stage has the highest probability of information overload, followed by the design stage. The main sources of information overload are the project participants contributing the key expertise in each stage. In the design stage, the key contributors are architects and consultants, and in the construction stage, contractors and sub-contractors. Architects’ and consultants’ contributions to information overload show a similar pattern through the project duration, as do those of contractors and sub-contractors. This is the first of its kind in construction project management and provides an invaluable source of reference and guidance on the probabilities of the occurrence of information overload in a construction project. The model predicts the situations where information overload is high, moderate, low or non-existent. It is then possible to concentrate on those overloaded areas by using the appropriate means or strategies."

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Full text: content.pdf (393,534 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2000 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.strategies (0.016354) class.man-software (0.013484) class.impact (0.012353)
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Permission to reproduce these documents have been graciously provided by Icelandic Building Research Institute. The assistance of the editor, Mr. Gudni Gudnason, is gratefully appreciated


J Ye, Keith Ellis, T Hassan, S Firth, 3Matti Hannus, C Sheridan

an approach to Impact Assessment of ICTs for Energy Efficiency

Abstract: The importance of information and communication technologies (ICTs) as an enabler for energy efficiency is well understood, however there is no one agreed common methodology for assessing the impact of ICTs on energy efficiency. In order to promote legitimacy, transparency and real progress in the application of ICTs to improving energy efficiency there is a clear need for common ways of assessing energy performance based on a common understanding of commitments, targets and methodology. In this paper, common means for assessing the impact of ICTs on energy efficiency are reviewed and the approaches of organisations focused on the development of ICT impact assessment methodologies are discussed. Subsequently, a potentially useful means of qualitative impact assessment is suggested. The proposed methodology aims to leverage the heuristics of domain experts and is based on life cycle thinking coupled with elements of an adapted capability maturity model/framework. The SMARTT taxonomy developed as part of the overall approach for common assessment is also described. SMARTT stands for Specification and design, Materialisation, Automation and operational decision support, Resource and process management, Technical integration and Trading/transactional management. Aligned to these six high level categories are twenty sub-categories to which user-defined ICTs/research and technology developments (RTDs) are mapped. An impact assessment example is given to illustrate how the proposed approach can be used at the offering level. The SMARTT taxonomy and common methodology are deemed by the authors to be as a useful means of assessing the impact of ICTs on energy efficiency both within and across sectors and potentially offers a foundation on which to base more quantitative methods to assess the impact of ICTs on energy efficiency.

Keywords: Impact assessment model, ICT, Energy efficiency, Impact quantification

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Full text: content.pdf (371,065 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2011 (browse)
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Oloke D A, Edwards D J

An intelligent system for improving plant information management

Abstract: The modern economy is reliant upon the application of mechanisation to sustain economic growth and prosperity. However, plant users must invest substantial and continuing capital resources in order to maximise turnover and profit. An exact quantification of profitability and performance resulting from plant usage can only be achieved through the effective documentation and utilisation of plant records. This paper sought to review existing information management systems for off-highway plant and equipment (e.g. excavators, rigid dump trucks, telehandlers and so on) and determine whether such represent an appropriate solution to modern industrial needs. Pilot study findings reveal paper based and electronic documentation formats resident on PC and local networks; PC being the most common system utilised. Overall, information management systems employed within the off-highway plant sector compare rather poorly to more technological advanced industries (e.g. rail and aviation). Based upon these findings, a new Internet based 'intelligent, multi-user functional' application is proposed that essentially consists of an integration of three core components, namely: (i) a web-based Relational Database Management System (RDBMS); (ii) a dynamic Model Base Management System (MBMS); and (iii) a Knowledge Base Management System (KBMS). The paper concludes with direction for future work that aims to model aspects of plant history file data collected.

Keywords: off-highway plant, information technology, information management, internet and intelligent decision support

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Series: itaec:2003 (browse)
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van Rees R

Clarity in the usage of the terms ontology, taxonomy and classification

Abstract: There is a lack of clarity when discussing the following three terms: classifications, taxonomies and ontologies. A general cause of confusion is caused by a trend, observed at a recent conference, to use the most fashionable of the three terms: "ontology", without further qualifications. This lack of clarity prompted the writing of this paper with the aim of clarifying the terminology used. A detailed extract from all relevant papers of the EBEW-conference 2001 on the use of the three terms was made to provide a quantification of the usage of the three terms. The recommendation by the author is to make a specific choice of label ("ontology", "taxonomy" or "classification") for your dataset and to provide further qualification on top of that label to remove ambiguity.

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Full text: content.pdf (167,157 bytes) (available to registered users only)

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Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by the University of Auckland. The assistance of the editor who provided the full texts and the structured metadata, Dr. Robert Amor, is gratefully appreciated.


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