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A Ciribini & G Galimberti

4D Project Planning and H&S Management

Abstract: A The European Client Organisations must face huge responsibilities by 92/57/EC Directive when the Health and Safety Management System has to be built in. Moreover, Public Client Organisations are trying, in different ways, to cope with such duties in modifying their Project Execution Plans over time so to update project schedules and reports complying with H&S Plan-related measures. The researchers have performed a detailed analysis which should allow Project Sponsors and Project Managers to deal with Time Management following a safety-oriented approach.

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Full text: content.pdf (505,136 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2005 (browse)
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Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by the Technische Universität Dresden.


Al-Jibouri S, Mawdesley M, Al-Mohamdi G

Information link model for construction using artificial intelligence

Abstract: This paper reports on a novel project model developed to help clients plan, monitor and control their construction projects. It describes a knowledge-based system designed for this purpose. The paper initially concentrates on the practical aspect of knowledge acquisition indicating problems that were faced and solutions employed. Following this, the structure of the knowledge-based system which was developed is outlined and its use described. Conclusions are drawn as to the applicability of the model and the final system. The work undertaken shows that it is feasible to benefit from the field of artificial intelligence to develop a project manager assistant computer program that utilises the benefit of information and its links.

Keywords: construction, information model, project control, knowledge-based system, artificial intelligence

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Full text: content.pdf (450,482 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: itaec:2003 (browse)
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Alexander Löfgren

Towards mobile lean communication for production management

Abstract: This paper reports on an ongoing case study of a mobile computing pilot project at Sweden’s largest con-struction company, Skanska AB. The company has recognized the potential of a mobile computing platform based on the tablet computer user device for construction site management teams. A global initiative within the company has started with the aim of improving information management and project communication at production site operations with the use of tablet computers. The paper portrays Skanska’s ambition towards the creation of usefulness and benefit of the tablet platform for the site based mobile workforce in the initial development and implementation process. The evolving mobile computing project has so far been directly influenced by the needs of intended end users and pro-gressed in a trial and error fashion. The paper also discusses the role of mobile computing and project communication in a wider industrialization perspective; integration of project organization and technology that enables an effective platform for collaboration to facilitate leaner communication in the construction process.

Keywords: mobile computing, construction site, production management, tablet computer, usefulness, implementa-tion, project communication

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Full text: content.pdf (344,875 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2007 (browse)
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Alshawi M

A strategic integration of information technology and buisness strategies: a structured methodology

Abstract: It is anticipated that the future role of IT in the conseruction industry will be consolidated. Construction firms will move away from traditional ad-hoc IT investments and go towards well planned strategies. This paper reports on a proposed structured methodology to integrate business with IS/lT strategies. Factors such as mission, objectives, critical success factors, information technology, information systems are: defined and assessed in an overall framework. The amalgamation of business objectives and ISflT strategies is highlihgted as king vital prerequisite for suceessful IT investments. Finaly, the paper explains how the proposed structured methodology will be implemented on a private practice.

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Full text: content.pdf (1,344,550 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:1993 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.strategies (0.063525) class.commerce (0.024035) class.roadmaps (0.010487)
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Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by the National University of Singapore. The assistance of the editors, particularly Prof. Martin Betts, is gratefully appreciated.


Amor R, Betts M, Coetzee G, Sexton M

Information Technology for Construction: Recent Work and Future Directions

Abstract: Advancing the application of information technology in construction is a major international research and innovation endeavour of concern to scientific establishments and industry. A significant focal point for this research, in terms of its dissemination and the derivation of a shared research agenda, has been the working commission concerned with IT for construction within the International Council for Innovation and Research in Construction (CIB). Working commission 78 of CIB has been active for about 20 years in holding annual meetings of leading scholars in the field. These annual meetings have allowed the principal research activities from around the world to be presented to expert fora and documented in a series of annual proceedings. More recently, some of the more complete research projects have been reported in an on-line electronic journal published in association with the working commission. The meetings have typically allowed debates and discussion to take place regarding the state of progress with key research themes, the emergence of new research themes, and a vision of construction activities in the future to which ongoing research could relate. This paper seeks to capture some of the overall experiences from the activities of this working commission by reviewing the key research issues that have been addressed in recently reported work and seeking to elicit a vision of future IT-enabled construction projects that might inform future research. It reports on an overview of the scope, current approaches and future research agenda that has arisen from consideration of the papers presented, and discussion that took place, at its most recent meetings in South Africa in 2001 and Denmark in 2002.

Keywords: Information Technology, Construction, Research Agenda, Vision.

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Full text: http://www.itcon.org/2002/16 (available to registered users only)

Series: itcon:2002 (browse)
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Arif A A, Karam A H

A comparative study: with insight into the use of IT in local architectural practices

Abstract: This paper reports on the use of Information Technologies (IT) in the South African building industry. It offers an insight into the architecture profession, a profession that plays a major role in the construction sector. The analysis is based on the results of a survey conducted in the Western Cape Province during the year 2000. In an attempt to uncover the similarities and differences between the local context and the international one, this paper outlines a few elements of IT for comparison. After a brief introduction to the IT map of South Africa, the analysis concentrates on the following four issues: Response and Respondents, General IT usage, Use of Computer-Aided-Design (CAD) and Use of Networks. Each of these issues is framed in both the local and the international contexts. Despite the shortcomings of using different questions with different emphasis when referring to other surveys, it is still believed that reporting on local practices is not extremely meaningful in isolation. It is hoped that this type of analysis will serve to unravel the particulars of the construction industry in South Africa providing its counterparts with a new perspective.

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Full text: content.pdf (141,121 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2003 (browse)
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Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by the University of Auckland. The assistance of the editor who provided the full texts and the structured metadata, Dr. Robert Amor, is gratefully appreciated.


Blackmore J M

Computer aided development of knowledge in the construction process

Abstract: Modern regulations control the performance of our built environment rather than the methods and materials of construction. The designer has freedom to fulfil specified objectives any way he chooses, but he must show that he is fulfilling the regulatory intention, and fulfilling it well enough. How does he convince the building surveyor that his building will provide an acceptable level of compliance? Where does he find the information to justify his choice of solutions to the regulatory problems? And where does the regulator find the information needed to determine whether or not a proposed solution is acceptable? The answers lie in the sea of regulatory information and research that is the source of all building reedation. Required levels of compliance are implicit in ixaditional, prescriptive regulations. Background research data, legal rulings, records of committee decisions, articles, advisory notes, commentaries, accreditation reports, cornon practice - all give an indication of the level of compliance that society and the regulators are willing to accept and help the designer and the regulator establish criteria of acceptance. This vast array of knowledge helps the regulator determine the intentions of existing regulations and write realistic rules for the performance of buildings. But where does the search fgr knowledge begin? Information technology can structure the search and help find a way through the jungle of data, macheteing obstructions to the introduction of innovative solutions. A structured, selective search can give the regulator access to all the data he needs to support his arguments, allowing the full realisation of the benefits of performance regulation. Linked to a powerful expert system that assists and checks his passage through the regulations, CSBO is creating an IT system to facilitate these benefits.

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Full text: content.pdf (2,214,097 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:1993 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.legal (0.085813) class.analysis (0.024178) class.synthesis (0.023322)
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Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by the National University of Singapore. The assistance of the editors, particularly Prof. Martin Betts, is gratefully appreciated.


Bloomfield D P

The role of case studies in the uptake of innovation in construction

Abstract: The UK Department of the Environment, Transport and the Regions has initiated a Construction Best Practice programme. The primary objective is to improve management best practices. The technical performance of the industry also needs to be improved by identifying and promoting opportunities for industry to adopt new technical innovations and incorporate them into standard practices. Accordingly, a series of Technical Best Practice initiatives will be set up. One of these will cover Construction IT. It is expected that Case Study material will form an important element of the IT Best Practice programme. Concrete examples of use of technology in practice are likely to be more convincing than simple exhortations and theoretical reports. There are three major issues that need to be addressed. 1. A Case Study is, by its nature, very specific and it can be difficult for the reader to ascertain if there is sufficient commonality between the problem described and the situation that he/she faces in order to assess whether the solutions are applicable. 2. It is difficult to describe the problem and solutions in sufficient detail, yet in a way that encourages the material to be read, understood and used. Ideally a common format needs to be developed for describing the key facts. 3. A further aspect of importance is how to determine what applications are most in need of Case Studies. Limited resources are available and it is essential that these are targeted in such a way as to produce maximum returns for the industry as a whole. This paper describes a framework for addressing these three issues and will provide an update of the work of the UK Construction IT Technical Best Practice programme.

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Full text: content.pdf (48,114 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:1998 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.environment (0.009079) class.social (0.005934) class.legal (0.002856)
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Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden. The assistance of the editors, Prof. Bo-Christer Björk and Dr. Adina Jägbeck, is gratefully appreciated.


Bourdeau L, Dubois A-M, Poyet P

A common data model for computer integrated building

Abstract: The connection of various building performance evaluation tools in a collaborative way is an essential request to develop true CAD systems. It is a basic requirement for the future of integrated information systems for building projects, where the data concerning the multiple aspects can be exchanged during the different design steps. This paper deals with the on-going research concerning the generation of a common data model in the framework of a European collaborative action, the COMBINE Project , which is supported by the CEC, General Directorate XI1 for Research Science and Development, within the JOULE programme. The first step of the research concerns the progressive construction of a conceptual model and the paper focuses on the development of this Integrated Data Model (IDM). The paper reports on the definition of the architecture of the IDM. The main issues and the methodology of the IDM development are presented.The IDM development methodology is based on successive steps dealing with the identification of the data and context which are considered by the Design Tool Prototypes (DTP) to be connected through the IDM, the conceptual integration of this knowledge, and the implementation of the model on an appropriate software environment.

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Full text: content.pdf (1,370,970 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:1991 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.communication (0.048499) class.environment (0.016386) class.represent (0.010886)
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Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by Eindhoven University of Technology.


Brandon P, Watson I

An expert system for strategic maintenance planning

Abstract: Recent changes in legislation have made housing associations (HAs) more financially responsible for all aspects of maintenance of their new housing stock. Because of the levels of funding within HAs and the need to provide accommodation at a "fair rent,"the planning of maintenance, and the consequent planning of expenditure has never before been so vital. Moreover, most literature on maintenance, including government reports and research by professional bodies or academic institutions, identifies a need for improvement in decision making regarding building maintenance. The project has provided an expert system (ES) that assists maintenance and finance officers in strategic planning of maintenance. The system (called EMMY) is not a database for HAs building stock and their tenants, or a program that itemises maintenance jobs, handles invoices, and performs various accounting tasks. It is a strategic management tool. Whilethere are many programs in existence that estimate the life-cycle costs of buildings or provide maintenance management, they all share two major problems: They require voluminous data input to describe each building; They function as "black boxes;" that is, data is put in and answers are given with little indication ofhowthe answers were generated and what variables affected the results. Storing all the relevant information in a database and selecting only that information required for the building under consideration is one method of reducing data input. In this way one can construct a modelof the building from pre-packaged components, and calculations can then be performed using spreadsheets. This approach has the advantage ofreducing data input and being relatively low cost (Tuts 89). Althoughthere is avariety of computer software available to the industry, thetechnology with potentially the greatest benefits is still the least known and most rarely used - the ES. ESs can directly address both of the problems outlined above: by reducing t

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Full text: content.pdf (930,794 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:1992 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.strategies (0.055604) class.social (0.033963) class.synthesis (0.021859)
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Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by Research Press of the National Research Council of Canada. The support of the editor, Dr. Dana Vanier, is gratefully appreciated.


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