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Atul Khanzode, Martin Fischer, Dean Reed

Challenges and benefits of implementing virtual design and construction technologies for coordination of mechanical, electrical, and plumbing systems on a large healthcare project

Abstract: This case study presents the challenges that the project team faced and the benefits they realized in imple-menting virtual design and construction technologies to coordinate the Mechanical, Electrical and Plumbing (MEP) systems on a $95M healthcare project in Northern California, USA. These challenges include creating a work structure for the MEP coordination process, organizing the project team consisting of designers, engineers, contractors, and subcontractors, determining the handoff of information between the team members, creating guidelines for the most efficient use of virtual design and construction technologies, creating the process of conflict identification and resolu-tion between the MEP subcontractors, and aligning the contractual interests of the coordination team to meet the over-all project schedule. We also discuss the benefits that the project team achieved by using the virtual design and construction tools for the coordination of the MEP systems. These benefits include labor savings ranging from 20 to 30 % for all the subcontrac-tors, 100% pre-fabrication for the plumbing contractor, only one recorded injury throughout the installation of MEP systems over a 250,000 square feet project area, less than 0.2% rework for the whole project for the mechanical sub-contractor, zero conflicts in the field installation of the systems and only a handful of requests for information for the coordination of the MEP systems. The overall benefits to the owner include about 6 months’ savings on the schedule and about $9M in cost for the overall project.

Keywords: virtual design and construction, conflict identification, menoMMechan eal, Electricalpand Plu systemsmbing

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Series: w78:2007 (browse)
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C. Mourgues & M. Fischer

A product/process model-based system to produce work instructions

Abstract: The state-of-practice method to produce formal and good work instructions is time intensive, error prone and produces instructions with inconsistent format and content. These problems force contractors to rely on verbal communication to deliver work instructions to their laborers despite the negative impacts of this informal communication on productivity, rework, workface questions, and safety. This paper presents an automated system – FIPAPM, Field Instructions from Product And Process Models – to produce work instructions for laborers of cast-in-place (CIP) concrete construction. The FIPAPM system extracts design information from product models and construction information from process models based on the work scope of the activity for which the work instruction is produced. The presented system proved to produce work instructions faster, more correctly, and more consistently than the state-of-practice method. Therefore, FIPAPM enables contractors to produce formal, good-quality work instructions on a daily basis reducing field communication problems of informal, verbal work instructions.

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Series: w78:2009 (browse)
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Ekambaram Palaneeswaran, Mohan Kumaraswamy, Thomas Ng, and Peter Love

Neural Network Modeling For Rework Related Cost Overrun And Contractual Claims In Construction Projects

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Series: w78:2006 (browse)
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Ozan Koseoglu, Dino Bouchlaghem, David Kerr

Collaborative mobile visualisation in construction (MobVisCon) framework development and validation

Abstract: Mobile technologies and wireless communication experienced a rapid development over the last decade, with many industrial sectors realising the benefits of mobile collaboration. The advantages of using mobile computing are in the ability to share data remotely in real time, reduce rework and paperwork, being able to solve problems on site, construct accurate databases by the timely and continuous collection of data, improve the quality of information, and decrease operational costs. Mobile technologies are now widely available offering good opportunities to the con-struction industry to work collaboratively. Due to the limitation in computational resources of mobile devices, the use of visualisation of design documents through mobiles has not been investigated in detail. However, mobile devices for the visual representation of design documents and specifications may offer new opportunities for accessing and moni-toring the construction remotely. The latest developments in mobile hardware and software enable unconditional ac-cess to 2D and 3D design information and corresponding documents. Mobile visualisation and visual communication may completely change collaboration between the project stakeholders during the execution of the construction activi-ties. The main aim of this research is to investigate the use of mobile communication and visualisation technologies during the exchange of information between design teams based in the office and construction sites with a focus of achieving real-time collaboration. This paper presents the development of a “Collaborative Mobile Visualisation in Construction (MobVisCon)” framework based on knowledge from the literature, results of a detailed industry survey, and construc-tion scenarios. Results from the application of the MobVisCon framework on a live construction project case study are also presented.

Keywords: mobile and wireless technologies, visualisation, collaboration, construction, MobVisCon

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Rischmoller L, Fischer M, Fox R, Alarcon L

4D planning and scheduling (4D-ps): grounding construction it research in industry practice

Abstract: Several authors have lamented that research efforts in construction IT have not embraced the issues associated with implementation and industry practice (Betts, 2000) and that the rhetoric and visions associated with construction IT are sometimes distant from the reality of construction usage (Koskela, 2000). This paper discusses the observation-participation method (Yin, 1994) as a way to ground construction IT research in industry practice. This research methodology considers the industry as a point of departure, followed by examination of a case study using the observation participation method (Yin, 1994). In this methodology, the researcher is not merely a passive observer, but assumes a variety of roles within the case study and participates in the studied activities. The observation-participation method application to the case study offers the opportunity to see what others have not yet seen (Stake, 1998) and allows gaining access to events and groups, which, in other ways, are inaccessible to scientific research. The researcher perceives reality from the point of view of someone “in” the case study instead of someone “external” to it. The research goal was to test 4D Planning and Scheduling (4D-PS) to demonstrate its benefits as a CAVT (Computer Advanced Visualization Tool) applied to the case study. The objective was to find out how 4D model reviews can help generate more constructible projects by assisting construction planners in optimizing construction sequences, identifying and resolving schedule conflicts and providing feedback from construction teams to design teams. To get tangible results, 4D-PS needed to be researched in a real life context. Hence, the observation participation method was the most suitable research methodology to accomplish this task. This paper presents our experience with the observation-participation approach on a large construction project. It details some of the organizational and business challenges of creating synergies between a business and a research focus. 4D-PS uses 4D models to accomplish construction planning and scheduling tasks. It was applied on the case study project by the first author in collaboration with other project construction Planning team members. The result was an optimized, detailed, construction schedule for 100,000 cubic meters of concrete that was verified and visualized by using the 4D-PS methods developed by the team. Opportunities for improving the schedule were detected through 4D simulations, and the sequence of activities was quickly adjusted in response to feedback from the project planners. The corrected sequence was then again verified using the 4D method. 4D-PS lets planners formulate tighter, more finely tuned construction plans, and it also helps to develop contingency plans to handle delays in material deliveries or unavailability of resources. Important decisions concerning deadlines, sequences, and resource utilization, which ordinarily would have been made later at the job site, were better made ahead of time to avoid rework in the case study project, and the construction team became convinced of the value of improving the construction plan through the use of 4D-PS.

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Class: class.communication (0.023958) class.roadmaps (0.013642) class.impact (0.013278)
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Suermann, Patrick and Issa, Raymond

Evaluating the Impact of Building Information Modeling (BIM) on Construction

Abstract: This research assessed perceptions about the impact of the implementation of Building Information Modeling (BIM) on construction projects. Survey questions centered on impact with respect to six primary construction key performance indicators (KPIs) commonly used in the construction industry as accepted metrics for assessing job performance. These include: quality control (rework), on-time completion, cost, safety (lost manhours), dollars/unit (square feet) performed, and units (square feet) per man hour. Qualitative data was collected through a survey instrument intended to assess practitioners’ perceptions about BIM impacts on the six Key Performance Indicators. The survey was targeted at National Institute of Building Sciences (NIBS) Facility Information Council (FIC) National BIM Standard (NBIMS) committee members. The survey, with a response rate of 50 completed surveys, showed preliminary results indicating that the NIBS FIC NBIMS members felt that a BIMbased approach improves construction metrics compared to construction without BIM. Specifically, the highest three ranking KPIs in order of most favorable responses were quality, on time completion, and units per man hour. The second tier of favorable responses included overall cost and cost per unit. Finally, only 46%, or less than half, of the respondents thought that construction safety was improved through BIM.

Keywords: BIM, Construction, NBIMS, Metrics, KPI

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Series: convr:2007 (browse)
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Tiwari S, Howard H C, Levit R E

A design notification scheme for distributed AEC framework

Abstract: The Architecture, Engineering and Construction design process (AEC) involves participation of many inter-dependent specialists, who nevertheless make autonomous design decisions in their specialized domains. This fragmented and multidisciplinary design process often suffers from inadequate communication among specialists and a lack of coordination of design information. In this paper, we present a design-change notification scheme for a distributed engineering environment. The notification scheme facilitates conflict resolution by providing the relevant information about the design objects involved in a conflict. It operates on a global design repository, which uniformly captures the design data and cross-functional design dependencies. Upon detection of a design conflict, notification messages are automatically generated and delivered to concerned project participants in a particular sequence that is based on the nature of the conflict and the roles of the parties involved. We assert that this type of notification system in a design environment will facilitate identification of design conflicts early in the design process, and should decrease the number of change orders and rework during the construction phase. Fewer change orders and reduced project meetings can result in enhanced trust, improved cooperation, and lower project costs.

Keywords: design conflict; architecture, engineering and construction; engineering databases; constraint management; distributed systems

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Series: w78:1993 (browse)
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Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by the National University of Singapore. The assistance of the editors, particularly Prof. Martin Betts, is gratefully appreciated.


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