Welcome
Digital library of construction informatics
and information technology in civil engineering and construction
 

Works 

Search Results

Facilitated by the SciX project

Hits 21 to 30 of 179

Belevicius R, Valentinavicius S, Weener R J

Optimisation of grillage-type foundations

Abstract: The mathematical models for optimisation of grillage-type foundations are presented. Minimising ofmaximum in absolute value vertical reactive force, bending moment, and reaction-bending momenttogether is sought employing methods of finite elements, analytical sensitivity analysis, andmathematical programming. Present models and computer code are implemented in the softwareMatrixFrame. Solutions of a number of problems demonstrate the validity of proposed algorithms.

Keywords:

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf (233,114 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: ecce:2001 (browse)
Cluster:
Class:
Similar papers:
Sound: read aloud.


Bellot Matas I

BECOC: a knowledge bank and its use in construction and CAD systems

Abstract: The development of the BECOC prototype (Structured Knowledge Bank for Construction Elements) was undertaken in order to test the integration of Data and Knowledge using the SITEC model (Construction Technology Information System). After the graphical definition of a building exterior, the assignment of the construction solutions is dynamically controled using the Knowledge Bank for real time decision making. To represent the knowledge that acts on the data the knowledge bank consists of an Object Oriented Data Base and a Rule System, developed using the NEXPERT/OBJECT package. In this manner it is possible to establish relationships among properties, concepts, restrictions in values, structural relations and the control of standards compliance, which in this case has been limited to thermic, acoustic and weight requirements. The system helps the user to take decisions and it analyses the context in order to make the deductions needed to maintain internal data consistency. The positive results of this work indicate the way €or further developments, and demonstrate that expert systems and traditional technologies coupled together can be effective and give the desired answers in monitoring design in the everyday problems in construction technology.

Keywords:

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf (977,770 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:1991 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.store (0.066751) class.analysis (0.031103) class.synthesis (0.023636)
Similar papers:
Sound: read aloud.

Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by Eindhoven University of Technology.


Bergsten S, Knutsson M

4D CAD- an efficient tool to improve production method for integration of apartments in existing buildings

Abstract: This paper describes an ongoing research project on application of a 4D CAD tool for design and production planning of vertical extensions of existing buildings (over-roofing) in Stockholm city, for creation of a more densely populated city as the demand for apartments in the city centre increases. 4D CAD is a concept, which combines an object oriented 3D CAD model with time. 4D CAD is a kind of information visualisation that is easier to understand than traditional methods, such as 2D drawings and time schedules, which are used to manage construction projects. 4D CAD is a logical way of imaging a construction management tool. It is a tool that is conceptually much closer to an intuitive picture of a construction process than 2D drawings and time schedules. The 4D concept is developed at Stanford University and to support the concept researchers at Stanford have developed a prototype that is being used in some complex construction projects in California. The focus of the research project “Integration of apartments in existing buildings by use of Light Gauge Steel Framing”, which this paper is a part of it, is to improve production methods in order to reduce design, planning and construction time for conversions of, and extensions to existing buildings in the city centres. A way to improve the production methods is by utilising a 4D planning process in combination with industrialised production of building components. Extensions to existing buildings are due to the demand for new apartments in attractive locations in the city centres and shortage of land for housing in city centres. The Light Gauge Steel constructions have many benefits for conversions of, and extensions to existing buildings. According to research results the Light Gauge Steel Framing system is suitable for industrial production. This building system results in a very light weight building compared with traditional materials e.g. concrete which makes it suitable for over-roofing extensions. The materials used in the Light Gauge Steel Systems is thin steel members, plaster boards and mineral wool. Many of the problems, which occur during vertical extensions of existing buildings today, are solved when they are discovered, that is sometimes on the site. Some examples of these problems are poor compatibility between the existing building (structural components and material) and the Light Gauge Steel Framing, detail solutions of the building components, shafts and piping for ventilation, water, sewage and drainage etc. It is less expensive to discover and to correct errors at an early stage compared to solving them on the site. Further a lot of construction time will be saved, which will decrease the disturbance on existing surroundings. Several problems have to be considered in the planning process in order to minimise the disturbance on existing activities and surroundings. This could be done by the use of a 4D CAD planning tool. An over-roofing project located in the city means that the land to use during the production period is limited and expensive. Thereby is the logistic to and from the site more complicated. Consequently the site management and logistic of building components to the building site and their storage on the site is most important. In fact the 4D concept is an efficient planning tool to organise the logistic of the site during the planning phase instead of as today during the production. The site layout can be simulated and visualised with a 4D CAD tool for the actors in the project which in particular will help the site engineer to organise the activities, material flow and site logistic. The value of using the 4D CAD concept is studied by comparing the traditional planning process of a number of over-roofing projects in Sweden with the planning process of the 4D CAD concept. This paper discusses how a 4D CAD tool together with an industrialised production method can be used for improving the production process for an over-roofing project in order to reduce the construction time and with secured quality. The reader will understand and appreciate the added value in form of a more efficient way of managing construction projects.

Keywords:

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf (708,786 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2001 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.economic (0.022264) class.impact (0.010607) class.software development (0.010605)
Similar papers:
Sound: read aloud.

Permission to reproduce these documents have been graciously provided by CSIR Building and Construction Technology. The assistance of the editors, Mr. Gustav Coetzee and Mr. Frances Boshoff, is gratefully appreciated.


Blackmore J M

Computer aided development of knowledge in the construction process

Abstract: Modern regulations control the performance of our built environment rather than the methods and materials of construction. The designer has freedom to fulfil specified objectives any way he chooses, but he must show that he is fulfilling the regulatory intention, and fulfilling it well enough. How does he convince the building surveyor that his building will provide an acceptable level of compliance? Where does he find the information to justify his choice of solutions to the regulatory problems? And where does the regulator find the information needed to determine whether or not a proposed solution is acceptable? The answers lie in the sea of regulatory information and research that is the source of all building reedation. Required levels of compliance are implicit in ixaditional, prescriptive regulations. Background research data, legal rulings, records of committee decisions, articles, advisory notes, commentaries, accreditation reports, cornon practice - all give an indication of the level of compliance that society and the regulators are willing to accept and help the designer and the regulator establish criteria of acceptance. This vast array of knowledge helps the regulator determine the intentions of existing regulations and write realistic rules for the performance of buildings. But where does the search fgr knowledge begin? Information technology can structure the search and help find a way through the jungle of data, macheteing obstructions to the introduction of innovative solutions. A structured, selective search can give the regulator access to all the data he needs to support his arguments, allowing the full realisation of the benefits of performance regulation. Linked to a powerful expert system that assists and checks his passage through the regulations, CSBO is creating an IT system to facilitate these benefits.

Keywords:

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf (2,214,097 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:1993 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.legal (0.085813) class.analysis (0.024178) class.synthesis (0.023322)
Similar papers:
Sound: read aloud.

Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by the National University of Singapore. The assistance of the editors, particularly Prof. Martin Betts, is gratefully appreciated.


Bloomfield D P

The role of case studies in the uptake of innovation in construction

Abstract: The UK Department of the Environment, Transport and the Regions has initiated a Construction Best Practice programme. The primary objective is to improve management best practices. The technical performance of the industry also needs to be improved by identifying and promoting opportunities for industry to adopt new technical innovations and incorporate them into standard practices. Accordingly, a series of Technical Best Practice initiatives will be set up. One of these will cover Construction IT. It is expected that Case Study material will form an important element of the IT Best Practice programme. Concrete examples of use of technology in practice are likely to be more convincing than simple exhortations and theoretical reports. There are three major issues that need to be addressed. 1. A Case Study is, by its nature, very specific and it can be difficult for the reader to ascertain if there is sufficient commonality between the problem described and the situation that he/she faces in order to assess whether the solutions are applicable. 2. It is difficult to describe the problem and solutions in sufficient detail, yet in a way that encourages the material to be read, understood and used. Ideally a common format needs to be developed for describing the key facts. 3. A further aspect of importance is how to determine what applications are most in need of Case Studies. Limited resources are available and it is essential that these are targeted in such a way as to produce maximum returns for the industry as a whole. This paper describes a framework for addressing these three issues and will provide an update of the work of the UK Construction IT Technical Best Practice programme.

Keywords:

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf (48,114 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:1998 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.environment (0.009079) class.social (0.005934) class.legal (0.002856)
Similar papers:
Sound: read aloud.

Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden. The assistance of the editors, Prof. Bo-Christer Björk and Dr. Adina Jägbeck, is gratefully appreciated.


Bowden S, Thorpe A, Baldwin A

Usability testing of hand held computing on a construction site

Abstract: Unless current hand-held computers are found to be usable by site-based personnel the uptake of these new systems will be slow regardless the benefits available to these individuals and the project team as a whole. The technology to extend IT solutions to personnel in the field is available, but there is a preconception that site personnel are not IT literate and therefore will not be able, or willing, to take full advantage of the benefits that IT tools bring. This paper presents a methodology for assessing usability, describes the usability testing of hand held computers by site workers and concludes that this type of device will meet their needs.

Keywords:

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf (313,188 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2003 (browse)
Cluster:
Class:
Similar papers:
Sound: N/A.

Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by the University of Auckland. The assistance of the editor who provided the full texts and the structured metadata, Dr. Robert Amor, is gratefully appreciated.


C Argiolas, F Melis, E Quaquero

Knowledge management in building process

Abstract: Over the last few years, the management and organizational aspects of the construction process have undergone a profound reflection that is closely linked to the development and the clear changes in the market. Such market is characterized by a rapid change, a strong growth in technology, and by a widespread and transparent information. International character, knowledge and innovation are key elements to win an increasingly exasperated competition. Moreover, the growing complexity of the construction sector - due both to the rapid proliferation of products and innovative technical solutions, and to the need to take into consideration side, but not secondary, aspects of the object (environmental impact, energy efficiency, durability, safety, etc.) - points out that present management patterns of the construction process are no longer appropriate to the context in which one operates. Therefore, the construction sector faces an inevitable process of growth in which knowledge is an indispensable resource. The present article aims at showing how Knowledge Management techniques (KM) might represent a possible tool to assist in achieving such goals through a rational organization of large amounts of data and through a corporate use of the knowledge that characterizes the various stages of a building process.

Keywords: knowledge management, building process, interoperability, collaborative design

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf (259,667 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2011 (browse)
Cluster:
Class:
Similar papers:
Sound: N/A.


C Bogen, M Rashid, E W East

A Framework for Building Information Fusion

Abstract: Data reported by supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) systems is critical for evaluating the as-operated performance of a facility. Typically these systems are designed to support specific control domains, but facility performance analysis requires the fusion of data across these domains. Since a facility may have several disparate, closed-loop SCADA systems, resolution of data interoperability issues (heterogeneities) is a prerequisite to cross-domain data fusion. There are no general methods for resolving these heterogeneities in the context of a nonproprietary core building information model (BIM) format. This article describes how these standard data models are applied to a general framework for the integration of building information models and building sensor telemetry. Given the number of very large corporations, each with its own research agendas and proprietary products, and the large number of installed buildings, each with its own control systems, yet another control scheme or technology will not make an impact on improving this market. The authors propose solutions to these underlying data heterogeneities by adopting existing data standards and introducing new data schemas (only when necessary) based on consensus between industry, government, and academic stakeholders. The Industry Foundation Class (IFC) 2X4 controls domain is the foundation of the authors’ decomposition of SCADA systems as components, assemblies, and connections that relate to other objects in the facility. The Open Building Information eXchange (oBIX) provides the basis for the authors’ representation of raw telemetry streams that map to the underlying IFC model. The system concept described in this article is part of an effort that is expected to produce an Industry Foundation Class Model View Definition (MVD) for building SCADA systems, product type templates for building SCADA products, the architectural design of an integration platform, and the specification of common predictive and analytical functions for deriving usable intelligence from the integration framework.

Keywords: Smart Buildings, Data Fusion, Building Controls and Automation, Building Information Modeling (BIM), Industry Foundation Classes IFC

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf (216,249 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2011 (browse)
Cluster:
Class:
Similar papers:
Sound: N/A.


C Mastrodonato, A Cavallaro, M Hannus, J Nummelin, N Jung

ICt for Energy Efficienct buildings: proposed approach for a stakeholders-based strategic roadmap

Abstract: ICT4E2B Forum project aims to bring together all relevant stakeholders involved in ICT systems and solutions for Energy Efficiency in Buildings. Moreover the project has the objective of identifying and reviewing the needs in terms of research and systems integration as well as at accelerating implementation and take-up. ICT4E2B Forum bases its roadmapping activities on the outputs of REEB project that has already developed a high-level roadmap on ICT for Energy Efficient Buildings. Starting from this expert-based work, ICT4E2B Forum intends to promote, through community building activities, a better understanding, a closer dialogue and a more active cooperation between researchers, end-users/practitioners, building owners, technology-suppliers, and software. The exploitation of ICT is consider the adding value in order to support informed decision-making (both human and automated) in the current delivery and in the use of sustainable and energy-efficient buildings and districts. By accomplishing these objectives, ICT4E2B Forum is mapping the sector-specific priorities into a common view and vocabulary, thereby enabling communication and understanding between experts in different sectors that need to join forces in order that fundamental improvements in energy efficient buildings can be achieved. All this coordination work will support in defining future research directions as well as in channelling efforts, while favouring consensus buildings on the roadmap itself.

Keywords: Energy-efficient buildings, ICT4E2B Forum project, REEB project, Strategic Roadmap, Stakeholder-based.

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf (174,418 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2011 (browse)
Cluster:
Class:
Similar papers:
Sound: N/A.


Can Ersen F?rat, Juhani Kiiras, Kalle Kähkönen, Pekka Huovinen

Model based scheduling in building projects – is it oxymoron?

Abstract: In building, most projects are still planned and scheduled based on the randomly accumulated, contextual experience among planners and managers. The key inputs for scheduling tasks, i.e. the dependencies, man-hours, and durations of activities may have never been organized well in the focal planner’s mind. The aim of the paper is to intro-duce some new viable ways of modeling scheduling activities in the context of building based on the integration of a product model, a process model, and complementary IT solutions. The integrative rationale of the new Building Con-struction Information Model (BCIM) is herein justified in terms of combining the building product model, the building construction resource and cost model, and the building construction process model. Some new feasible ways of auto-mating building project planning are explored, in particular in terms of using template schedules to automate schedul-ing activities as part of the advancement and exploitation of the suggested BCIM.

Keywords: building projects, information technology, modeling, process models, product models, scheduling

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf (759,119 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2007 (browse)
Cluster:
Class:
Similar papers:
Sound: N/A.


For more results click below:

 

hosted by University of Ljubljana



includes

W78




© itc.scix.net 2003
show page 1 show page 2 this is page 3 show page 4 show page 5 show page 6 show page 7 show page 8 ... show page 18 Home page of this database login Powered by SciX Open Publishing Services 1.002 February 16, 2003