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Ekaterina Petrova, Peter Lind Johansen, Rasmus Lund Jensen, Steffen Maagaard and Kjeld Svidt

Automation of Geometry Input for Building Code Compliance Check

Abstract: Documentation of compliance with the energy performance regulations at the end of the detailed design phase is mandatory for building owners in Denmark. Therefore, besides multidisciplinary input, the building design process requires various iterative analyses, so that the optimal solutions can be identified amongst multiple alternatives.However, meeting performance criteria is often associated with manual data inputs and retroactive modifications of the design. Due to poor interoperability between the authoring tools and the compliance check program, the processes are redundant and inefficient. That has left the industry in constant pursuit of possibilities for integration of the tool within the Building Information Modelling environment so that the potential provided by the latter can be harvested and the processed can be optimized. This paper presents a solution for automated data extraction from building geometry created in Autodesk Revit and its translation to input for compliance check analysis.

Keywords: Building Information Modelling, Building Energy Design, Performance Assessment, Interoperability

DOI: https://doi.org/10.24928/JC3-2017/0265

Full text: content.pdf (2,377,347 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: jc3:2017 (browse)
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Elger D, Russell P

Teaching knowledge management using distributed practice simulation

Abstract: The paper describes attempts by the authors to convey the importance of teamwork in architecture to students, be it in the process of architecture or the object itself. One of the main postulates of the work is that pedagogically, teamwork is better trained than taught. This is further compounded when the technological burden of distributed practice is introduced. Using Internet based communication technologies, the authors have sought to create a design studio environment that simulates real world situations where major planning partners are located in different cities and even different countries. Using experience gained over four years of networked studios, the authors were able to enrol five other universities for a semester-long experimental design studio. In essence, the students undertook to solve the design problem in teams spread over different universities. From 43 students, 14 teams (each with 3 members and one with 4 members) were assembled with no two students from the same university in the same team. Furthermore, each team was assigned a tutor from a fourth (or fifth) university. The different universities were far enough separated so as to preclude easy face to face meetings. Instead, the Internet was used as a communication medium. The entire range of available technologies was put to use. A central web site which logged user presence served as a virtual "place" where the students and tutors could meet to carry out informal discussions or arrange to transfer the discussions elsewhere (e.g. to a chat room or a videoconference). The web site platform also provided the entire group with supporting information such as personal diaries, common calendar functions, email lists and directories of student work. The students made their work available on the web throughout the semester in order to communicate with their tutor as well as with one another. Essential to the successful communication was an initial acquaintance session. This took the form of a 3-day workshop at the beginning of the semester. While this workshop ostensibly focussed on the design problem, it effectively served as a social engineering exercise in order to shake out compatibility among potential team members. After the workshop, the group met again 15 week later for a final review. Halfway through the semester, the individual teams travelled to their tutors for a mid-term review. Otherwise, all communication took place over the Internet (or through conventional telecommunication methods). The theme itself was certainly selfreferential: to design a centre for a virtual university. This cross-pollination of design method and design theme was an additional encumbrance for most students, but also provided a fertile bed for a wide range of design solutions. It is important to note that all of the teams were able to complete the assignment and postsemester questionnaires show an overwhelming positive reaction to the experimental studio, notwithstanding the high costs of travel and telephone. The paper discusses the feedback from the students and possible implications for future iterations of the concept.

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Full text: content.pdf (890,508 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2002 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.man-man (0.093221) class.social (0.038530) class.collaboration (0.035454)
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Permission to reproduce these documents have been graciously provided by the Aarhus School of Architecture, Denmark. The assistnace of the editor, Prof. Kristian Agger, is gratefully aprecciated.


Ercoskun K, Kanoglu A

Customer relationships management in AEC sector

Abstract: Quality is the major guide for enterprises in terms of competitive strength of organizations in the information age. While globalization increases its impact throughout the world, the term “Quality” expands its meaning and the cultural and social aspects of quality becomes the most important contributors of the product quality. The customer orientation of the finished product and after sales service is becoming vital in terms of marketing. Industrialized sectors had been providing solutions in that sense under the Total Quality Management (TQM) principles since the early 80’s. For the Architecture/Engineering/Construction (AEC) sector, several managerial tools and techniques has been adapted but these partial solutions do not perform well enough as they did success in other industrialized sectors. This is probably because the need for an enterprise-wide customer orientation infrastructure is not yet proposed. This paper discusses the early concepts about a “Customer Relationships Management” (CRM) model for the AEC sector which, CRM to be the foundation for TQM; issuing that CRM is the key enabler for any tool or technique towards quality and industrialization. .

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Series: w78:2003 (browse)
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Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by the University of Auckland. The assistance of the editor who provided the full texts and the structured metadata, Dr. Robert Amor, is gratefully appreciated.


Faraj I, Alshwai M

A Modularised Integrated Computer Environment for the Construction Industry: SPACE

Abstract: This paper outlines an overview of the SPACE project. SPACE (Simultaneous Prototyping for an Integrated Construction Environment) is a rapid prototyping environment which supports a subset of a construction project life cycle. Its main objective is to develop a future intelligent integrated design and construction system for the civil and building domain through which a number of solutions can be generated and analyzed. This is accomplished through the use of a comprehensive project data model capable of supporting a range of applications. The data model consists of an independent data model and application specific data models. The research concentrates on establishing a project data infrastructure and tools for managing the information exchange that occurs during a project life cycle, with emphasis on the design, site layout and construction planning, cost estimating and maintenance applications. This will enable better, more efficient and more cost effective buildings to be designed. The output generated by the prototype are very detailed which can improve the decision making process, different constraints can be applied and their consequences can be simulated. The prototype was tested with a number of case studies, some of which can be viewed by downloading the demo file attached with this paper.

Keywords: Computer Integrated Construction, Project Model, Integration

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Full text: http://www.itcon.org/1999/3 (available to registered users only)

Series: itcon:1999 (browse)
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Felix Hofmann, Volker Berkhahn

Adjusting a tool for collaborative planning to requirements in practice - realisation of a client-server architecture

Abstract: The planning of projects in building engineering is a complex process which is characterized by a dy-namic composition and many modifications. For a computer-aided and network-based cooperation a formal description of the planning process is necessary. In the research project “Relational Process Modelling in Cooperative Building Planning” a hierarchical process model was defined and divided into three parts: an organisation structure, a building structure and a process structure. Furthermore, we implemented a prototype graph modelling tool in Java to build up the process model dynamically. Our tool includes functions to instantaneously check the structural correctness of the graphs. The usage of critical path and Petri net methods is possible. In our transfer project “Verification of a Tool for Co-operative Planning in Practice”, we currently use a practice building project to test our process model and the prototype implementation. With many engineers working on the process model in collaboration, our implementation needs a client-server architecture to allow distributed work. This architecture comes along with different types of problems: simultaneous work demands a real-time status and thus Cli-ent-Callback, for instance through firewalls. The separation of model and view is difficult, and finally concurrent modi-fications have to be prevented. In this context, problems and solutions are discussed.

Keywords: project management, process modelling, network based collaboration, client-server architecture

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Series: w78:2007 (browse)
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Fruchter R, Demian P

Knowledge management for reuse

Abstract: Managing and reusing knowledge in architecture, engineering and construction firms can lead to greater competitive advantage, improved designs, and more effective management of constructed facilities. We define design knowledge reuse as the reuse of previously designed buildings, building subsystems, or building components, as well as the knowledge and expertise ingrained in these previous designs. This paper introduces the notion of knowledge in context. We argue that in order for knowledge to be reusable, the user should be able to see the context in which this knowledge was originally created and interact with this rich content. We call a repository of such knowledge in context the corporate memory. We describe empirical observations of designers reusing knowledge from their personal design experiences. Based on these observations, we formalize two key activities in the process of knowledge reuse: finding reusable items and understanding these items in context. We formalize six degrees of exploration that lead to understanding. We describe a prototype knowledge management system, CoMem (Corporate Memory), that supports these activities. CoMem is distinguished from the document-centric state-of-practice solutions by its approach of "overview first, zoom and filter, and then details-on-demand."

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Full text: content.pdf (269,521 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2002 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.man-software (0.017227) class.bestPractise (0.011535) class.education (0.007733)
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Permission to reproduce these documents have been graciously provided by the Aarhus School of Architecture, Denmark. The assistnace of the editor, Prof. Kristian Agger, is gratefully aprecciated.


Futcher K G, Rowlinson S

Information-management-systems used by the Hong Kong construction industry

Abstract: This paper presents the results of current research into the extent that construction IT is used to support the large and dynamic construction industry of Hong Kong. The 1990’s have seen a continued growth in construction with the Government’s airport-core-programme of projects taking centre stage against a backdrop of a growth in construction of infrastructure and other public-sector and private-sector building works. Through economic necessity, the Government of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (S.A.R.) plans to promote significantly more construction within the territory of the Hong Kong S.A.R., over the next two decades This is essential to meet the growth demands that are forecast to occur over the medium-term planning horizon of fifteen years. Concurrently, economic expansion in the neighbouring regions of southern China requires considerably greater amounts of new infrastructure. The Hong Kong construction industry will, inevitably, want to be heavily involved in these business opportunities. It is presumed that these demands for construction will attract participation from the global construction industry. The relative exploitation of construction IT for competitive advantage, by competing construction companies from different parts of the world, has therefore become important to the industry in Hong Kong. The Hong Kong construction industry has an enviable reputation and it is to be expected that this high-performance is supported by the use of construction IT technologies. However, Futcher and Rowlinson have previously presented subjective arguments that ‘Hong Kong’s reputation for high-speed, on-time and within-budget, construction belies the rudimentary nature of the industry’s exploitation of IT’, that ‘Hong Kong [is] strong in hardware, telecommunications and the marketing of technology. Opposed to weakness in systems support; programming; IT services, such as implementation and operational administration; documentation; and user-training’. They have stated that ‘the industry is likely to adopt IT only if it is seen as an accepted good practice. It does not actively seek IT solutions to achieve competitive advantage; as a means of offence and defence; to reduce costs; to innovate; or to impress.’ The research provides a factual basis for these statements by way of a comparative assessment on the use of construction information technologies in the Hong Kong industry. Knowledge which is of value to all the participants pursuing new business in this dynamic market. It is indicative of the sino-asian construction industry’s perceptions of the value and utility of construction IT. The paper provides argument for industry-lead development of construction IT.

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Full text: content.pdf (64,083 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:1998 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.economic (0.020479) class.commerce (0.013201) class.strategies (0.012000)
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Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden. The assistance of the editors, Prof. Bo-Christer Björk and Dr. Adina Jägbeck, is gratefully appreciated.


Gage Christianson, Evan Wilson, Matthew Henke, Omar Ahlnaity and Jeong Woo

Cloud-Based Project Management: Selecting IT Solutions for Construction Companies

Abstract: Cloud Based Software (CBS) has transformed the construction industry. CBS allows its users to access information from anyplace, at any time, given they have a platform, device and internet to access it. CBS programs have also developed from specialized programs in one company function, to specialized programs in several areas in the construction field, such as: daily logs, document/photo storage, prequalification, and scheduling. CBS has proven to significantly increase productivity and communication in the construction company. A research survey was conducted for construction companies in the Mid-West about their current usage of CBS programs. It was found that 84.4% of respondents reported having to use three or more different construction programs due to the fact that none completely satisfied all their cloud integration needs. 81.8% of respondents also reported inefficiently operating at less than two company functions per program. Respondents stated frustrations that programs are not all-inclusive and do not contain all of the day-to-day functions needed to run their project on one platform. This is evidence of the need for one program to be used for all daily company functions. It was found through research and analysis that there are all-in-one CBS programs available in the current market.

Keywords: Construction Information Technology (CIT), Cloud-Based Software (CBS), Construction Software Analysis, Construction Project Management, Construction Data Survey

DOI: https://doi.org/10.24928/JC3-2017/0142

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Glisic, M., Samardzic, M. and Lazic, M.

Application of Mathematical Methods While Discovering and Defining Optimal Solutions for Architectural Projects and Construction Subsystems

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Full text: content.pdf (1,093,995 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:1986 (browse)
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Goncalves R, Pimentao J, Vital M, Sousa P, Silva H, Steiger-Garcao

Integrating applications for the construction industry using a STEP-based integration platform (SIP)

Abstract: International construction industry has not still achieved a high degree of integration and automation in the past years. The European ESPRIT III project number 6660, RoadRobot (Operator Assisted Mobile Road Robot For Heavy Duty Civil Engineering Applications) intends to design and to implement an architecture to support the integration and automation tasks in that domain. To aid the implementation of the architecture, a STEP-based (ISO 10303) platform for integration of applications (SIP toolkit), was developed by UNINOVA. The general purpose of SIP is to assist the achievement of standardised Computer Integrated Manufacturing (CIM) environments, providing a set of development system tools. Last year, during CIB W78 and TG10 held at the University of Stanford - California (USA), SIP and the aim of the RoadRobot project were presented. During the CIB‘96, the RoadRobot architecture and its achieved results will be shown, as well as the improvements of SIP made in order to meet the project requirements. Special care will be taken concerning the problems found and the solutions adopted.

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Full text: content.pdf (113,530 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:1996 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.software-machine (0.020476) class.environment (0.018161) class.man-man (0.017124)
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Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by the University of Ljubljana. The assistance of the editor, Prof. Ziga Turk, is gratefully appreciated.


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