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Alvise Simondetti

Designer’s toolkit 2020: a vision for the practice

Abstract: Designer’s toolkit is rapidly changing and design practices need a shared vision of what the short, me-dium and long term might be. With this in mind we interviewed twenty-four thought leaders in the design community worldwide. Four big ideas emerged from the interviews: transferring technologies from other industries has provided great bene-fits, but it has also generated the need to transfer processes; changes in the way we build drives changes in the de-signer’s desktop, including the representations that designers use to communicate; greater gains are achieved by focus-sing on the interplay of specialised algorithms; “just on time” design data improves design. Four possible contexts for the designer’s toolkit are described: the proprietor aimed at increasing productivity, the open-source aimed at increasing IT driven creativity, either more or less engaged with fabrication. Finally, the paper concludes by proposing what designers ought to be doing today. Actions include educating specialist toolmakers, custodian and math modellers; integrating computer controlled machine workshops into designers’ project spaces; the automation of repetitive design tasks; supporting communities around software tools and store project data according to geospatial co-ordinates.

Keywords: Design community, technology transfer, process transfer, designer's desktop, representation, communication

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Series: w78:2007 (browse)
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Amor R, Clift M

Document models and concurrent engineering

Abstract: Documents form the major means of dissemination of information in the construction industry. They are currently the source of all building information that many professionals in the industry see about the building. They are also the repository of many design decisions and the record of decisions made on the developed building. However, product models in the construction industry tend not to incorporate models of documents and documentation. Integrated design systems also often neglect aspects of the design process such as the handling of documents in the project, as they are mainly developed for the exchange of information about the physical aspects of a building design. In this paper, a model of documents developed for use in the ESPRIT funded ToCEE (Towards a Concurrent Engineering Environment) project (Scherer et al. 1995) is described along with the implementation environment used to manage documents in a project.

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Full text: content.pdf (25,957 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:1996 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.store (0.058604) class.environment (0.021455) class.social (0.014023)
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Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by the University of Ljubljana. The assistance of the editor, Prof. Ziga Turk, is gratefully appreciated.


Amor R, Marsh R, Hutchison A

Electronic news service for the european construction industry

Abstract: "Abstract The Electronic News Service (ENS at http://www.connet.org/NS/Intl/) is an AltaVista-like service which is specialised for the construction industry. It has been developed as one of the services in the EC project CONNET (Construction Information Service Network, at http://www.connet.org/). The ENS provides a searchable index of the contents of Internet sites relevant to the built environment. The database containing the source set of Internet sites to index has information on over 14,300 Internet sites across the world, categorised and classified by several criteria. This base set of Internet sites is drawn from all major lists offered to the construction industry (e.g., Yahoo, EEVL, UK-BRP, etc) and from published sources (e.g., Architect's Journal, Building magazine, etc). Over 35 major lists of site sources are utilised to build, maintain, and grow this set of 14,300 resources for the construction industry. The ENS service provides all in the industry with a free method of identifying sources of information based on the content of a web page or service based classifications. Users are able to define profiles for news they have an interest in and to be periodically, and automatically, notified of new or modified web pages and sites which meet their criterion. Running the ENS within the CONNET network provides mechanisms to link together all news services, which are available, to provide answers to user requests across complimentary systems, or even to take requests established for news and use them to identify other information sources of relevance (e.g., publications, software, products). This paper will describe the ENS, the methods it uses to gather and index construction information across the world, and the services it offers to the construction industry. However, the main content of this paper will be an analysis of the references gathered from the 35 major lists of resources which are established across the world. This analysis looks at the overlap that exists between the Internet sites referred to by each of these lists (which is remarkably small), the particular biases which appear in the lists (mainly towards English language and USA-based information), the currency of the sites in the lists (quite poor), and the predicted coverage of total construction-based Internet resources found in all of these lists. Our analysis of the lists also shows a relatively small number of 'must have' sites, which are included in the majority of the lists operated around the world. These 'must have' sites are highlighted and analysed to provide an understanding of what makes these sites of such great importance to the whole industry."

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Full text: content.pdf (885,898 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2000 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.collaboration (0.028828) class.man-man (0.010240) class.analysis (0.010151)
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Permission to reproduce these documents have been graciously provided by Icelandic Building Research Institute. The assistance of the editor, Mr. Gudni Gudnason, is gratefully appreciated


Andrej Tibaut, Branko Kau?i?, Peter Podbreznik, Marjan Lep, Dušan Zalar

Towards intelligent information system for public interurban road passenger transport management

Abstract: Public road transport forms a complex and dynamical domain that encompasses fields of traffic, business and politics. Management of the system poses a challenge for governmental entities which are responsible for coordi-nation, control and data gathering from private transport companies. A need for IT support is obvious. The paper systematically describes a distributed enterprise information system named AVRIS developed for the Direc-torate of the Republic of Slovenia for Roads. AVRIS adds new value to the management and coordination of the domain for public interurban bus transport. First a theoretical work flow model, consisting of processes, phases and states is defined. Built upon the model a multi-tiered IS architecture is developed which incorporates a number of advanced IT concepts, like application server, shared communication space, MVC, etc. The concepts are implemented using latest open source Java technologies. First real experiences with AVRIS are evaluated and presented in the paper.

Keywords: traffic engineering, public passenger transport management, traffic informatics, decision support, shared space, work flow, open source, Java

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Full text: content.pdf (781,550 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2007 (browse)
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Bester A, Huhnt W

Tendering process model for application of reliability analysis

Abstract: Construction data is a useful source of information for construction project management. The sources of data for various aspects of construction management is, in addition to the current project information and the engineer’s professional experience, also historical data from previous projects. An example of the use of historical cost data is in the application of the Limit State Cost Function (LSCF) model to perform construction project risk modelling. The LSCF-method was developed for assisting the consulting civil engineer to make a quantifiable judgement in the selection of a project tender. It is based on the reliability of estimating the outcome of the cost for a specific tender in terms of the risks involved in a project, by using construction cost data. The way in which this data have been captured has shown deficiencies which limits the utility of it if the scope of the data captured and the processes of both capturing and applying the results are not carefully planned. The application of the data can therefore not be seen without the process in which it is generated. The process is characterised by the generation and processing of data by the co-operation of several groups of persons at the different stages of the project. These groups of persons execute different tasks, for which appropriate subsets of information at different levels of detail are needed. The paper is focused on the specific requirements that have to be supported to model such processes. Tools are presented to support the specification of the process model. These tools enable the investigation of the model with respect to completeness and correctness. In addition, the tools support the implementation of an information system that is used in the execution of tasks during the tender process.

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Full text: content.pdf (234,503 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2001 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.processing (0.052641) class.economic (0.016156) class.impact (0.011672)
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Permission to reproduce these documents have been graciously provided by CSIR Building and Construction Technology. The assistance of the editors, Mr. Gustav Coetzee and Mr. Frances Boshoff, is gratefully appreciated.


Bingunath Ingirige, Ghassan Aouad

Awareness and usage of information standards in the uk construction industry: a survey by the SIENE network

Abstract: Developments in information standards and interoperability in the construction industry are becoming increasingly popular. Much of this development is centred on the Internet for sharing of information and generic data exchange. However many industry participants are unaware of the benefits of information standards and reluctant to make long-term investment on them unless there is clear evidence of business benefits. The Network on Information Standardisation, Exchanges and Management in Construction (SIENE) was launched in March 2000 to streamline information standardisation and interoperability in the construction industry. It is an international network consisting of academics and industry practitioners in the UK and elsewhere whose work on the subject is of international reputation. The project is funded by The Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) under The Innovative manufacturing Initiative (IMI). The main source of knowledge gathering is through workshops conducted in the UK. The website of SIENE also provides opportunity for the members and other participants to enhance the knowledge base of the network. SIENE’s main objective is to explore current research being undertaken in the area of information standardisation and to benchmark UK performance with the rest of the world. It has also conducted workshops to investigate sources and types of barriers that prevent the adoption of information standards and to identify business benefits for construction firms. The findings of the project will be disseminated amongst industry and academia. The paper deals with the results of a questionnaire survey conducted by SIENE in the UK on awareness and usage of information standards among contractors, consultants, suppliers and clients in the construction industry. Forty members of the Construct IT, Centre of excellence in UK were selected as the initial target audience for the questionnaire survey. It is expected to broaden the scope of the survey to a wider audience in its second stage. The paper will discuss the information standards, which are widely being used in the UK construction industry and will highlight any organisational problems, which hinder the adoption of standards. It will also propose areas, which need to be improved for the firms in the industry to gain business benefits.

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Full text: content.pdf (385,336 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2001 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.strategies (0.031105) class.roadmaps (0.019768) class.commerce (0.017889)
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Permission to reproduce these documents have been graciously provided by CSIR Building and Construction Technology. The assistance of the editors, Mr. Gustav Coetzee and Mr. Frances Boshoff, is gratefully appreciated.


Blackmore J M

Computer aided development of knowledge in the construction process

Abstract: Modern regulations control the performance of our built environment rather than the methods and materials of construction. The designer has freedom to fulfil specified objectives any way he chooses, but he must show that he is fulfilling the regulatory intention, and fulfilling it well enough. How does he convince the building surveyor that his building will provide an acceptable level of compliance? Where does he find the information to justify his choice of solutions to the regulatory problems? And where does the regulator find the information needed to determine whether or not a proposed solution is acceptable? The answers lie in the sea of regulatory information and research that is the source of all building reedation. Required levels of compliance are implicit in ixaditional, prescriptive regulations. Background research data, legal rulings, records of committee decisions, articles, advisory notes, commentaries, accreditation reports, cornon practice - all give an indication of the level of compliance that society and the regulators are willing to accept and help the designer and the regulator establish criteria of acceptance. This vast array of knowledge helps the regulator determine the intentions of existing regulations and write realistic rules for the performance of buildings. But where does the search fgr knowledge begin? Information technology can structure the search and help find a way through the jungle of data, macheteing obstructions to the introduction of innovative solutions. A structured, selective search can give the regulator access to all the data he needs to support his arguments, allowing the full realisation of the benefits of performance regulation. Linked to a powerful expert system that assists and checks his passage through the regulations, CSBO is creating an IT system to facilitate these benefits.

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Full text: content.pdf (2,214,097 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:1993 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.legal (0.085813) class.analysis (0.024178) class.synthesis (0.023322)
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Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by the National University of Singapore. The assistance of the editors, particularly Prof. Martin Betts, is gratefully appreciated.


Ciftcioglu O, Durmisevic S, Sariyildiz S

Building design support by hierarchical expert networks

Abstract: "Rapid advances in parallel processing technologies gave essential impetus to intelligent information processing, which became the driving source of an emerging technology known as soft computing. This calls for intelligent systems that are able to process information which may be complex, uncertain even incomplete or contradictory. In this context, neural networks and fuzzy logic are the essential tools. Considering the merits of each approach separately, most suitable computational intelligence method can be used for a specific application. Additionally, the combination of these methods can provide enhanced information processing for decision-making with enhanced reliability. For building design, the computational intelligence system use a knowledge base formed by means of neural network and fuzzy logic (neuro-fuzzy) techniques, from a building design database. The application of such a system to a building design task was preliminarily demonstrated earlier [1]. The present research describes a systematic neural fuzzy modelling of data that form a knowledge base in a hierarchical form (s.figure below). Each sub-knowledge base represents a local expert, being level-one expert and the association of local experts forms a more comprehensive expert that becomes a global domain expert as level-two. The association of the experts is accomplished by means of fuzzy-logic-driven gating network that performs, the information handling as required. Although, the present paper describes two-level hierarchical experts as local and global, the associations can be done in more subtle form, i.e., in more than two steps so that the level of experts can be categorised in multi-level form. In such more complex structures, multi-level experts require related gating network that could similarly be designed. The building design support system with the expert network developed, as a whole, is generic enough for decision-makings with a novel systematic approach concept using appropriate database. Accordingly, the research deals with a particular architectural building design with efficiency and consistency features using the hierarchical expert network system described [1] Ciftcioglu O, Sariyildiz S. and Veer P. v.d., 1998 , Information Ordering for decision support in building design, D and DSS, Design and Decision Support Systems 4th International Conference on Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning, Castle Vaeshartelt, Maastricht, July 26-29, The Netherlands"

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Full text: content.pdf (519,213 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2000 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.analysis (0.064229) class.synthesis (0.019630) class.man-man (0.013152)
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Permission to reproduce these documents have been graciously provided by Icelandic Building Research Institute. The assistance of the editor, Mr. Gudni Gudnason, is gratefully appreciated


Drogemuller R, Woodbury R, Crawford J

Extracting representation from structured text: initial steps

Abstract: A great deal of work has been done in the past on natural language recognition within the field of artificial intelligence. The aim of this work was to allow natural language text to be read in by a computer and structured in a format that would allow automatic interpretation of the text. This was intended to reduce the "knowledge engineering bottleneck" that has been a significant constraint on the use of artificial intelligence techniques within many fields. Some similar work has also been done within the AEC industry concentrating mainly on building codes. The research project described in this paper aims to simplify the analysis of structured text and its conversion into computer interpretable forms by providing support with computer software. The work is built around two documents - a glossary of building terms used in Australia and the Building Code of Australia. The various issues concerned with "noise" in the source data, the structure and content of documents to be analysed and the desired computer interpretable result will be presented. This work is motivated by: · the need to maintain BCAider, a knowledge based system that assists in checking building designs for compliance with the Building Code of Australia; · continuing work in encoding of regulations in computer interpretable form; and · the need for international glossaries to support information harmonisation efforts such as the IAI and STEP. The software suite under development assists people with some understanding of language structure and knowledge engineering in converting structured text into computer interpretable form using a visual user interface. The current state of the design and development of this software suite will be described and the results of its use presented.

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Full text: content.pdf (262,275 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2000 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.retrieve (0.070694) class.analysis (0.045357) class.man-software (0.038615)
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Permission to reproduce these documents have been graciously provided by Icelandic Building Research Institute. The assistance of the editor, Mr. Gudni Gudnason, is gratefully appreciated


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