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Fadi Castronovo, Danielle Oprean, Yifan Liu and John Messner

Application of Immersive Virtual Reality Systems in an Interdisciplinary Design Studio Course

Abstract: The architectural, engineering, and construction (AEC) industry has been witnessing a recent growth of application of visualization and virtual reality technology for design reviews. As our future generations of designers and engineers enter the industry, they will have to possess the ability to leverage such technology. This study aimed at evaluating the experience of students from an interdisciplinary design studio course, in performing internal design reviews with two different types of display systems. The research aimed at understanding which systems the students found most valuable, immersive, and enjoyable when visualizing their models. The first system utilized was a semi-immersive three screen display system, while the second was a single screen large LCD television system. The participants included five groups, with students from different disciplines, such as architecture and architectural engineering. The groups were randomly split into two tracks and took part in an ABBA experimental procedure. The studentsÕ responses were collected through a survey, which was administered after they reviewed their design with each system. Based on the findings, the researchers were able to conclude that the utilized semi-immersive display system promoted the studentsÕ sense of immersion, spatial presence, and enjoyment, over their regular collaboration pod using an LCD screen.

Keywords: Virtual Reality, Design Reviews, Immersive Projection, Engineering Education

DOI: https://doi.org/10.24928/JC3-2017/0006

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Series: jc3:2017 (browse)
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Fellows A

Construction EDI in Australia some recent developments and current aims

Abstract: The construction industry in Australia covers a very large number o€ organisations from small suppliers and contractors to major consultants and government authorities. These are spread over a large geographical area and the works which they undertake range from very small to billions of dollars. There is a wide variation in technical sophistication within the industry. A 1992 survey of the use of electronic exchange of data between sections of the industry showed considerable interest, limited understanding, and little attempt at implementation. The current economic downturn and the long term return on the first costs involved, limits enthusiasm. Difficulties with its adoption and steps to overcome these are proposed with a timetable to the year 2OOO. This will be achieved only with government commitment, a well defined industry plan, and dose ties with the international EDFACT body of the United Nations.

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Full text: content.pdf (837,909 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:1993 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.economic (0.021734) class.strategies (0.017222) class.roadmaps (0.012829)
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Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by the National University of Singapore. The assistance of the editors, particularly Prof. Martin Betts, is gratefully appreciated.


Fenves S J

Information technologies in construction: a personal journey

Abstract: The paper presents an informal summary of one person’s journey of four decades in the field of using information technology in civil engineering and construction. This survey is not followed by any prediction of the future but, less ambitiously, by a list of issues to be addressed so as to face the future with confidence.

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Full text: content.pdf (39,669 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:1996 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.roadmaps (0.048622) class.strategies (0.023156)
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Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by the University of Ljubljana. The assistance of the editor, Prof. Ziga Turk, is gratefully appreciated.


Futcher K G, Rowlinson S

I.T. survey within the construction industry of Hong Kong

Abstract: This paper presents results taken from a 1998 postal survey of the consulting firms and the contractors of the Hong Kong construction industry. The survey included, as one part of the four-part survey instrument, the 'Health Check of the Strategic Exploitation of I.T.' developed by the UK Centre of Excellence for Construct IT (Betts and Shafagi 1997). This paper present the results of the IT health check for a population sample of three hundred and sixteen contractors and another population sample of two hundred and seven consultant firms operating within the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region of China.

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Full text: content.pdf (74,252 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:1999 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.strategies (0.055039) class.roadmaps (0.034922) class.impact (0.025544)
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Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by the Research Press of the National Research Council of Canada. The support of the editors, particularly Dr. Dana Vanier, is gratefully appreciated.


Futcher K G

User survey on a wan portfolio M.I.S. used for porfolio/project management in Hong Kong.

Abstract: This paper presents the results of recent research into the user expectations for a Management_Information_System (MIS) for the project/portfolio-managed delivery of a large and diverse range of projects. In 1998, the Works Bureau of the Government of Hong Kong undertook objective measurement of the extent that an MIS, called the PW_MS, contributed to the successful project and portfolio management of its large and diverse portfolio of more than two thousand public works projects. This rolling-programme of projects includes up to 72 types of public infrastructure. The delivery process depends on a highly differentiated organisation in which each of the public works departments has different staffing levels, workloads, locations, and each undertake different types of work. The objective of the assessment was to determine: · the extent that the PW_MS was successfully used for the management of individual projects; · the extent that the PW_MS was successfully used to help manage the portfolios-of-projects overall; · the extent that other means of data collection and reporting that are otherwise used for both of these functions; and, · to identify the requirements for an improved MIS. This paper presents the results of this postal survey of a population of five hundred and eighty-four authorised users of the PW_MS. It is a complex WAN system, with 168 terminals in the client and public works offices for operational access to the MIS. It has routines for the planning, reporting and monitoring of the cost, time and scope aspects of each project in the PWP. It establishes a fixed plan for each project and provides an audit trail of progress towards completion. The data in the system is combined to provide summary reports of portfolios of projects. A random selection from the User-population was used to form a population-sample for the postal questionnaire survey. The sample frame was constrained to ensure a 95% confidence limit that the response was statistically indicative of the population; and that it included sufficient numbers of the primary classes of users to also ensure a 95% confidence limit that the response was indicative of these strata of the population. This methodology is described in the paper. A sixty-five percent response was achieved. The results show that the User satisfaction with the PW_MS is not high. The results state a range of User dissatisfactions but they do not call for a fundamental change in approach: they validate the exploitation of proven, readily available, information technology for the management of portfolio-of-projects. Portfolio-management and project management is enabled by these techniques although the survey results indicate that more can be done to improve the man-machine interface. The results identify key-areas for such improvement. These findings are presented in the paper.

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Full text: content.pdf (182,628 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2001 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.social (0.023977) class.impact (0.022037) class.strategies (0.021118)
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Permission to reproduce these documents have been graciously provided by CSIR Building and Construction Technology. The assistance of the editors, Mr. Gustav Coetzee and Mr. Frances Boshoff, is gratefully appreciated.


Gage Christianson, Evan Wilson, Matthew Henke, Omar Ahlnaity and Jeong Woo

Cloud-Based Project Management: Selecting IT Solutions for Construction Companies

Abstract: Cloud Based Software (CBS) has transformed the construction industry. CBS allows its users to access information from anyplace, at any time, given they have a platform, device and internet to access it. CBS programs have also developed from specialized programs in one company function, to specialized programs in several areas in the construction field, such as: daily logs, document/photo storage, prequalification, and scheduling. CBS has proven to significantly increase productivity and communication in the construction company. A research survey was conducted for construction companies in the Mid-West about their current usage of CBS programs. It was found that 84.4% of respondents reported having to use three or more different construction programs due to the fact that none completely satisfied all their cloud integration needs. 81.8% of respondents also reported inefficiently operating at less than two company functions per program. Respondents stated frustrations that programs are not all-inclusive and do not contain all of the day-to-day functions needed to run their project on one platform. This is evidence of the need for one program to be used for all daily company functions. It was found through research and analysis that there are all-in-one CBS programs available in the current market.

Keywords: Construction Information Technology (CIT), Cloud-Based Software (CBS), Construction Software Analysis, Construction Project Management, Construction Data Survey

DOI: https://doi.org/10.24928/JC3-2017/0142

Full text: content.pdf (558,924 bytes) (available to registered users only)

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Goh Bee Hua, Chu Yee Leen

Developing national standards for the classification of construction information in Singapore

Abstract: Despite lagging far behind countries which have started developing construction information classification systems over the last 30 to 50 years, Singapore is fast catching up in this area of development via the formation of the Construction Industry IT Standards Technical Committee (CITC) in 1998. The Government's intention is to create Singapore into a business and IT hub, and the National IT Standards Committee (NITSC) was formed in 1990 to spearhead the development of national IT standards in all sectors of the economy. To date, the CITC has initiated and established standards in the areas of CAD, cost and resources information, and specification. The paper discusses the developmental process for one published standard, the Singapore Standard Code of Practice for Classification of Construction Cost Information (SS CP 80: 1999), and one standard which is in preparation, the Proposed Singapore Standard Code of Practice for Classification of Construction Resources Information. The intention is to share the Singapore experience with countries which are embarking on a similar programme. The next challenge for CITC is to manage change and promote widespread adoption of these standards by the industry. Results from the questionnaire survey and interviews indicate a positive attitude towards standards development but less positive towards full adoption. Lack of incentives, little immediate benefits, cost to be incurred from re-classifying historical data and cross-disciplinary differences are some of the findings. The key pointers for intended standard developers are: make a conscious effort of involving industry players in the development of the standards in order to help bring down barriers to change; adopt a two-pronged approach so as to achieve a win-win-win result; identify leaders in the industry who can drive the developed standard/technology in order to convince other players to follow suit; and develop assistance schemes to help small firms embrace standardisation and IT.

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Full text: content.pdf (75,350 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2002 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.economic (0.030731) class.synthesis (0.018880) class.impact (0.014794)
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Permission to reproduce these documents have been graciously provided by the Aarhus School of Architecture, Denmark. The assistnace of the editor, Prof. Kristian Agger, is gratefully aprecciated.


Haksever A M

A model to predict the occurrence of information overload of project managers

Abstract: "This paper investigates information overload of construction project managers. The aim is to identify its occurrence pattern and predict the occurrence probabilities in a given circumstance, as a project manager’s information load is inconstant in nature, fluctuating over time, changing character and source. First, a conceptual definition of information overload is developed, using time as the criterion to describe information load. Information overload for a project manager is taken as occurring when the demands on information processing time exceed the supply of time. Second, the variation of information load throughout the project is structured using the interaction of a project manager with project members through the stages of a project. These two elements are combined in a matrix format where values for information overload are ascribed to cells representing the interaction with each member during each stage of the project. Six key project members, and four project stages are defined. To allow the subjective quantification of information overload, five practical situations of real life information overload are described, of which one must be chosen for each of the twenty four stage-member cells. To test the model and calculate the probabilities of information overload, data were collected using a questionnaire survey of 140 project managers in the UK. Respondents were asked to select the relevant situation for each cell in the matrix. The resulting matrices had a weighting system applied and a mean calculated for each circumstance to create an Information Load Point (ILP), presented in an Information Load Matrix (ILM). The application of ‘Ordinal Logistic Regression’ into the ILP scores provides a predictive outcome, which gives the probabilities of a project manager being in any of the predetermined five information overload situations at any stage with any member. The detailed account of the calculations and the outcome of the analysis are presented. The results revealed that the extent and sources of information overload of construction project managers vary throughout the stages of a project. The construction stage has the highest probability of information overload, followed by the design stage. The main sources of information overload are the project participants contributing the key expertise in each stage. In the design stage, the key contributors are architects and consultants, and in the construction stage, contractors and sub-contractors. Architects’ and consultants’ contributions to information overload show a similar pattern through the project duration, as do those of contractors and sub-contractors. This is the first of its kind in construction project management and provides an invaluable source of reference and guidance on the probabilities of the occurrence of information overload in a construction project. The model predicts the situations where information overload is high, moderate, low or non-existent. It is then possible to concentrate on those overloaded areas by using the appropriate means or strategies."

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Full text: content.pdf (393,534 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2000 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.strategies (0.016354) class.man-software (0.013484) class.impact (0.012353)
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Permission to reproduce these documents have been graciously provided by Icelandic Building Research Institute. The assistance of the editor, Mr. Gudni Gudnason, is gratefully appreciated


Hansen K L, Gann D M, Groak S

Process improvement a survey of IT-based approaches & tools

Abstract: In today's world, with ever changing technologies and markets, engineering and construction firms are pressured not only to deliver high quality products and services within schedule and budget but also to be responsive to clients, adaptable, and flexible. Furthermore, organisations must assimilate increasing IT requirements and capabilities into their processes. Against this background, process representation tools can provide analytical methods useful in determining the value of specific processes as well as a means of improving these processes. This paper explores the possibilities and limitations of computer-based process representation tools and gives best practice examples from manufacturing, software development, and construction.

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Series: ecce:1997 (browse)
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Hartvig S, Ersen T

Teaching computing in civil engineering: knowledge systems.

Abstract: "After decades of research and development in ""advanced"" IT, the picture of IT usage in construction remains the same - industry in general is not taking proper advantage of commercially available IT-technologies, as for example knowledge systems. We and others [Raphael 99] think this is caused by the fact that technical universities do not include teaching in advanced computing for civil and building engineers, despite the outspoken need for it. At Department of Planning at the Technical University of Denmark, we have acknowledged this need, and we offer an intensive class in knowledge engineering. Experiences from that course have been presented in [Andersen98]. It is clear to us that this class is valuable, because it enables a fraction of the new generation of professional engineers to cope with 1) knowledge and problem solving and 2) more advanced use of IT. However, it is equally clear that we need to do more - that is: offer teaching in a broader field than just narrow scoped expert systems. We [Andersen98] have pointed out that the relatively narrow scope of the intensive class present a risk of giving the student a too narrow minded attitude to knowledge systems. We are in the process of renewing and possibly expanding our teaching in knowledge systems. To be able to move in the right direction a survey is about to be performed: we are in the process of tracking ""old"" students, now working in industry, in order to learn how our teaching have impacted their professional life and workplace. We seek empirical support for our idea that handling of ""knowledge"", ""problem solving"" and ""concepts"" are key skills for engineers rather than abilities in specific computer applications. The paper will present the results of our survey and considerations, and will include an outline of an improved teaching programme for knowledge systems in civil and building engineering. [Raphael99] Raphael B, Shea K, Smith I, A task and software independent CAE course, in proceedings AICIVIL-COMP99, civil-comp press 99. [Andersen98] Andersen T, Hartvig S, Teaching Knowledge Engineering: Experinces in: Artificial Intelligence in Structural Enginneering, Springer 99"

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Full text: content.pdf (315,577 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2000 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.education (0.056740) class.impact (0.029838) class.environment (0.027163)
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Permission to reproduce these documents have been graciously provided by Icelandic Building Research Institute. The assistance of the editor, Mr. Gudni Gudnason, is gratefully appreciated


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