Welcome
Digital library of construction informatics
and information technology in civil engineering and construction
 

Works 

Search Results

Facilitated by the SciX project

Hits 1 to 10 of 244

A Akcamete

An Approach to Capture Facility Maintenance and Repair Information to Store Change History

Abstract: During operations, changes happen to facilities frequently due to maintenance and repair (M&R)work, upgrades and renovations. Consequently, corresponding facility information needs to be updatedso as to provide reliable information to facility operators and managers. Moreover, the record offacility changes is necessary to understand the patterns of failures and to support proactivemaintenance decisions. Therefore, there is a need to enable storing of the information about suchchanges at the time that they occur. In current practice, facility documents are not frequently updatedand a complete history of changes is not available for supporting facility management decisions. Theauthors_ objective is to streamline the capturing of M&R information when these activities areperformed, so as to have a history of facility changes that can be used to understand how a building isdeteriorating and to support facility information updates. By observing M&R work records, weidentified the need for capturing different types of facility and change information for different typesof M&R work. Moreover, we observed the need for a spatial database to support pattern analysis byidentifying clusters that may not be found by using traditional databases. We developed a taxonomy ofM&R work that classifies various types of work on different types of facility components and listsassociated information modules that represent data required to be collected in the field. This approachenables a formal approach for capturing change information as a result of M&R work by providingcustomized templates for each type of work. The focus of this paper is to present the need forcustomization of information capture templates. The paper also gives a description of the approach offormally generating customized templates based on a taxonomy of M&R work and linking thecaptured history information with a facility information model. Enabling such a linkage will be thefirst step towards reasoning about the M&R history in order to analyze how a building deteriorates,identify problems in the building, and inform the users of facility information update needs.

Keywords: Facility maintenance, maintenance changes, change history, maintenance planning

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf (769,778 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2011 (browse)
Cluster:
Class:
Similar papers:
Sound: N/A.


A Cemesova, Y Rezgui, C J. Hopfe

Possibilities and challenges created by a smart material in building performance simulation

Abstract: Smart materials are predicted to ‘revolutionise’ the A/E/C industry. They are supposed to enable a building to change colour, shape, size and opacity. However, past research shows that smart materials are still not used very often in engineering applications to their full potential. In this publication we advocate that materials should not be only chosen for simple properties such as visual, physical and insulating characteristics, but for capabilities such as being able to save/generate energy, store information, and to react to stimuli from their local environment. Therefore, this paper will research into the addition of SolaVeil to a window, its physical configuration and the possibility to model and analyse it through Building Performance simulation (BPS). This material is primarily designed to eliminate glare and redirect light. As a result it can reduce energy use caused by air conditioning and artificial lighting systems. This paper researches into the behaviour of SolaVeil in a computer simulation using two different case studies. The first will compare how changing the width but maintaining the reflective area affects illuminance distribution, and the second will determine which physical properties of SolaVeil are most effective. Finally, conclusions are drawn based on the case studies and it is shown that smaller width light shelves are the most suitable for an anti glare product. It is also determined that for SolaVeil to minimise glare in a room without compromising illuminance levels, it should have a light shelf angle of 40 degrees, cover between 40-60% of a window and its strips should be spaced 5mm.

Keywords: SolaVeil, smart materials, building system design, illumination.

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf (199,958 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2011 (browse)
Cluster:
Class:
Similar papers:
Sound: N/A.


A Ekholm, L Häggström

BUILDING CLASSIFICATION FOR BIM – RECONSIDERING THE FRAMEWORK

Abstract: The purpose of building classification systems is to provide the sector with agreed and standardised ter¬minology and semantics, e.g. in systems for technical specification, cost calculation, and exchange of information. There is a growing need to use classification systems in a BIM context. In inter¬¬national construction projects and international construction product trade there is a need both to translate between national classification systems and to develop common systems. The idea behind the inter¬¬national framework standard for building classification ISO 12006-2 is that national systems would be easier to compare if they adhere to the class definitions suggested in the standard. A study of two classification systems, the BSAB system in Sweden and the DBK system in Denmark, both within the framework and yet not compatible, has risen the idea of a deeper analysis of the theoretical basis for the ISO 12006-2 classification system to find a solution to this problem. The project has developed such a theoretical framework in order to clarify the relationship between classes representing parts of buildings in the ISO 12006-2 standard, specifically the Construction entity part, Element and Work result classes. This is specifically needed when the standard is used in the context of BIM, since building models include both specialization and compositional relations among information objects representing parts of buildings. The proposed theoretical framework is based on a systems view on the built environment that distinguishes constructions in four main compositional levels: construction entities, technical systems, building elements and components. Based on the theoretical framework developed in this project, possible new interpretations of the classification standard ISO 12006-2 are discussed.

Keywords: building classification, ISO 12006-2, BSAB, DBK

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf (215,256 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2011 (browse)
Cluster:
Class:
Similar papers:
Sound: N/A.


A Grilo, R Jardim-Gonçalves & A Steiger-Garcao

Shifting the construction interoperability paradigm, in the advent of Service Oriented and Model Driven Architectures

Abstract: A major difficulty construction companies are currently facing is the lack of interoperability of software applications to manage and progress in their business. Organizations are being pressured up by new business relationships, driven for instance by new contractual challenges, which the exchange of information and documents with new partners are often incapable of being executed automatically and in electronic format. This is principally due to problems of incompatibility with the information representation adopted by the software applications they are working with. This problem arises not only during the project phase but also across the whole life cycle that includes operation and maintenance stages. In order to create the enabling conditions for the deployment of the electronic collaborative and commerce platforms it is fundamental to understand the variables that may influence its development, and how they determine the configuration of the e-platform. This paper, after present technology driven standards for the construction industry data management, it proposes the adoption of the emerging Service Oriented and Model Driven Architectures to shift forward the interoperability paradigm in this industrial sector. The paper illustrates some scenarios where significant impact is expected when adopting the proposed methodology.

Keywords:

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf (374,582 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2005 (browse)
Cluster:
Class:
Similar papers:
Sound: N/A.

Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by the Technische Universität Dresden.


A. Gehre, P. Katranuschkov, R. J. Scherer

Managing virtual organization processes by semantic web ontologies

Abstract: Interoperability within Virtual Organisations (VOs) is still only weakly supported by IT frameworks. Whilst service level interoperability has made remarkable progress since the emergence and the rapid growth of SOA and Grid technology in the last years, business processes – which are the driving force of each VO – still suffer distinct conceptual gaps regarding their decomposition to technical transactions. There exists no detailed approach that would allow describing technical as well as business aspects in a coherent yet flexible and extensible way. This paper presents a newly developed semantic framework that targets this requirement. The conceptual background is followed by an introduction of the developed semantic web ontologies. Based on these definitions, dedicated Ontology Services as well as a set of related end-user applications facilitating semantic technology have been designed and implemented. They are presented in the second part of the paper. Reported are results from the EU project InteliGrid (IST-004664; 2004-2007).

Keywords: semantic web, ontologies, virtual organisation, process modelling, process management

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf (973,369 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2007 (browse)
Cluster:
Class:
Similar papers:
Sound: N/A.


Agger K

Modeling the pragmatic solution

Abstract: An architectural project, designed with a modeling system was followed closely from sketching to detailed design, a report was made. Experiences on the use of a system with an architectural voca- bularium and architectural operations will be presented. The presentation will concentrate on how building modeling is facilitated by the system's understanding of building and buil- ding parts, and the way they are built together to form rooms, and on facilities to represent details without modeling in full detail as a short cut in modeling. The pragmatic solution to the problem of CAAD-systems with archi- tectural knowledge is discussed in terms of current limitations and further extensions.

Keywords:

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf (1,332,591 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:1988 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.synthesis (0.024203) class.communication (0.009266) class.deployment (0.008203)
Similar papers:
Sound: read aloud.

Permission to reproduce these documents has been graciously provided by the Lund University and the Swedish Building Centre. The assistance of the editors, Prof. Per Christiansson and Prof. Henry Karlsson, is gratefully appreciated.


Alain Zarli, Eric Pascual, Daniel Cheung

Information and Communication Technology for Intelligent and Integrated Controls in Buildings: Current Developments and Future Research

Abstract: A common and acknowledged vision today is the one that, in the future, buildings, along with their components, equipments, and their environment will communicate and be able to provide information on their status ubiquitously. This real-time available information will be interoperable via common protocols for holistic automation & control. The whole building will be supervised by intelligent systems, able to combine information from all connected devices, from the Internet or from energy service providers in order to efficiently control HVAC (heating & cooling), lighting, and hot water systems along with energy production, storage and consumption devices inside the building, taking into account the users' needs and wishes. In such a context, ICT is recognised as key for empowering people in the (built) universe in which they live, with smart e-metering and new smart e-devices – as well as becoming fully pervasive in the future optimization of energy in the built environment - where “Energy-efficient smart buildings” are to be buildings which contain systems that manage information for an optimal operation of building energy flows over the whole building lifecycle.In such a context, CSTB has developed an open framework for data collection and processing, to be installed in any built environment. It supports networked heterogeneous sensors and actuators (with appropriate communication protocols technology), allows assembling various “business” functions (with easy evolution and extension capability thanks to a concept of service composition and event-driven management between modules), can accommodate any hardware platform constraint (memory, computing power), and can be executed in any environments supporting a Java SE implementation. The framework is itself based on an OSGi platform. The notion of “sensor” is to be considered in a comprehensive way: physical sensor (analogic or logic), complex sub-system or meta-sensor (e.g. Agilent data acquisition system or alike), or even external services (e.g. getting weather data via the Internet). Fields of applications are energy-efficiency in the built environment, but also Ambient-Assisted Living (AAL), internal air quality assessment, collection of data related to inhabitants behaviours, etc..The REEB coordination action (European strategic research roadmap to ICT enabled Energy-Efficiency in Buildings and construction), as a European R&D technology roadmap initiative (achieved in the context of an EC-funded Coordinated Action - http://www.ict-reeb.eu) has identified ICT contributions to the energy efficiency of buildings mainly via improvement (and corresponding RTD) in integrated design (and indeed ICT tools for Energy-Efficient design and production management), integrated and intelligent control, user awareness and decision support to various stakeholders throughout the whole life of buildings, energy management and trading, and integration technologies. As far as the integrated / intelligent control field is concerned, REEB has fundamentally identified the following areas for future investigation:• automation & control: system concepts, intelligent HVAC, smart lighting, ICT for micro-generation & storage systems, predictive control;• monitoring: instrumentation: smart metering;• quality of service: improved diagnostics, secure communications;• wireless sensor networks: hardware, operating systems, network design.The paper will first introduce to expectations, requirements and potential future scenarios for ICT to support integrated and optimised control in future so-called smart buildings. It will then introduce to the current trend of developments at CSTB in this area, and will present the CSTBox as a tool federating and/or complementing functions (potentially relying on already installed systems) in the built environment. After a short presentation of the REEB project, the paper will follow up with exhibiting the outcome of the REEB project in terms of roadmapping RTD activities in this technological field, also providing with a first insight of their potential impact in the future.Acknowledgement: the authors wish to thank the European Commission (DG INFSO) for its financial support to the REEB co-ordinated action. Moreover, the authors are also grateful to the REEB Consortium partners, namely ARUP, ACCIONA, CEA, LABEIN, TUD, UCC & VTT.

Keywords: Energy-efficient buildings, Intelligent and Integrated Control, REEB project, CSTBox framework, Data collection and storage

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf (557,833 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2010 (browse)
Cluster:
Class:
Similar papers:
Sound: N/A.


Alshawi M

Objects definition and the life cycle of objects

Abstract: In order to produce a complete and efficient objects definition for an integrated environment, it is important that objects are considered within a well defined environment. Objects are subjected to a number of phases during their life cycle depending on the environment within which they are serving. This paper briefly explains a proposed structure for an integrated environment within which a new concept for object life cycle is introduced. The new concept is illustrated in an elements specifications application.

Keywords:

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf (1,215,425 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:1995 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.environment (0.037780) class.processing (0.025091) class.economic (0.011972)
Similar papers:
Sound: read aloud.

Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by the Stanford University, USA. The support of the editors, particularly Prof. Fischer is gratefully appreciated.


Amor R W, Hosiung J G

Multi-disciplinary views for intqrated and concurrent design

Abstract: The definition and implementation of user views is likely to be a major factor in the success of the ISO-STEP standard for computer-based representation of building components and their inter-connection. The development of a method for describing user views to a particular model is also likely to increase the usage of existing design tools. Currently, the arcane languages and the detailed knowledge required of the physics and terminology of the specific domains of many of these tools limit their use by designers. This paper addresses these issues by describing a system that can present information from a base computer model of a building to a given user. The language and level of detail of the system are directed at the needs and understanding of the user. This system allows multiple concurrent views to the base model, each view tailored to a particular discipline (eg, architect, structural engineer, services engineer, etc) and further tailored to meet the specific needs of the particular user in terms of understanding of the various disciplines and the level of information required. Used with a system that integrates various design tools through a computer based building model, this system will offer users information from a range of design tools at a level that they can comprehend.

Keywords: multi discipline views; product modelling; user interaction

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf (625,133 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:1993 (browse)
Cluster:
Class:
Similar papers:
Sound: read aloud.

Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by the National University of Singapore. The assistance of the editors, particularly Prof. Martin Betts, is gratefully appreciated.


Amor R, Clift M

Document models and concurrent engineering

Abstract: Documents form the major means of dissemination of information in the construction industry. They are currently the source of all building information that many professionals in the industry see about the building. They are also the repository of many design decisions and the record of decisions made on the developed building. However, product models in the construction industry tend not to incorporate models of documents and documentation. Integrated design systems also often neglect aspects of the design process such as the handling of documents in the project, as they are mainly developed for the exchange of information about the physical aspects of a building design. In this paper, a model of documents developed for use in the ESPRIT funded ToCEE (Towards a Concurrent Engineering Environment) project (Scherer et al. 1995) is described along with the implementation environment used to manage documents in a project.

Keywords:

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf (25,957 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:1996 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.store (0.058604) class.environment (0.021455) class.social (0.014023)
Similar papers:
Sound: read aloud.

Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by the University of Ljubljana. The assistance of the editor, Prof. Ziga Turk, is gratefully appreciated.


For more results click below:

 

hosted by University of Ljubljana



includes

W78




© itc.scix.net 2003
this is page 1 show page 2 show page 3 show page 4 show page 5 show page 6 ... show page 25 Home page of this database login Powered by SciX Open Publishing Services 1.002 February 16, 2003