Welcome
Digital library of construction informatics
and information technology in civil engineering and construction
 

Works 

Search Results

Facilitated by the SciX project

Hits 1 to 10 of 35

Aalami F, Fischer M

Joint product and process model elaboration based on construction method models

Abstract: In practice, construction planners need to plan and replan projects at several levels of detail and would like create 4D visualizations to communicate construction schedules. The current construction planning and scheduling process is , however, still largely manual and time-consuming, making it difficult to maintain an appropriate and realistic set of plans, schedules, and 4D visualizations throughout design and construction. Researchers have demonstrated the usefulness of a product model with a decomposition hierarchy and supported-by relationships between project components to generate a construction process model automatically. The product model's decomposition hierarchy supports the generation of hierarchical activities, and the supported-by relationships between components enable automated reasoning. However, the resulting process model is typically not a usable or realistic construction schedule, since activities can only be sequenced if elaborated to the same level of detail, and component-based activity elaboration is limited to the original product model. This paper discusses how a customizable and general representation of construction method models supports the transformation of a design-centric product model into a production-centric view. A formalized hierarchical construction planning process forms the basis of this translation process. The planning process is broken down into method-driven elaboration and hierarchical planning and scheduling steps. User-defined and user-selected construction method models drive the elaboration process by supplying the necessary activity and component elaboration knowledge. The product model undergoes a transformation from a design-centric decomposition to a production-centric decomposition. The elaborated activities are sequenced based on constraints that are passed on to the activities from their construction methods. The output of the planning process is a 4D production model. A 4D production model is a linked representation of an elaborated product and process models. A 4D production model is a flexible representation of the construction process that can support many views for communication and evaluation, e.g., 4D visualization, CPM-network, barchart, or resource histograms.

Keywords:

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf (289,626 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:1998 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.represent (0.035804) class.processing (0.027755) class.communication (0.018300)
Similar papers:
Sound: read aloud.

Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden. The assistance of the editors, Prof. Bo-Christer Björk and Dr. Adina Jägbeck, is gratefully appreciated.


Akbas R, Fischer M

Examples of product model transformations in construction

Abstract: This paper discusses the results of a case study of product model transformations and geometric reasoning techniques for a challenging project. The complex geometry in the Experience Music Project offers unique challenges in construction processes. Manual transformation of the design-centric product model prepared by the architect into a production model for construction is time-consuming. We discuss ways to transform a design view of a product model into a construction view emphasizing the value of product models supporting multiple views. Geometric reasoning aids in the planning, scheduling, coordination of the project, and modeling of temporary structures. We are developing methods to support these product model transformations using the geometric model.

Keywords:

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf (157,528 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:1999 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.synthesis (0.027802) class.represent (0.018809) class.impact (0.016070)
Similar papers:
Sound: read aloud.

Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by the Research Press of the National Research Council of Canada. The support of the editors, particularly Dr. Dana Vanier, is gratefully appreciated.


Akinci B, Staub S, Fischer M

Productivity and cost analysis based on a 4d model

Abstract: Four-dimensional (4D) CAD models are being used more and more frequently tovisualize the transformation of space over time. To date, these models are mostlypurely visual models. Any evaluation of a 4D model, e.g., whether it presents aworkable construction sequence, is left to the viewer. The evolution of 4D CADdemonstrates the ability to provide a tighter link between visualization andanalysis tools. In this paper, we discuss how an intelligent 4D model helpsidentify time-space conflicts between concurrent activities and provide assistancein calculating more realistic cost estimates. The 4D system (4D Work Planner)presented here is based on symbolic and graphic product and process models, andprovides both the visual and analytical feedback necessary to reengineerconstruction sequences.

Keywords:

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf (159,259 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:1997 (browse)
Cluster:
Class:
Similar papers:
Sound: N/A.


Anastasiya Yurchyshyna, Catherine Faron Zucker, Nhan Le Thanh, Celson Lima, Alain Zarli

Towards an ontology-based approach for conformance checking modeling in construction

Abstract: This paper gives an overview of a formal ontological approach of conformance models for regulations in Construction aiming at answering the research question: “is an IFC-represented building project compliant to a set of construction rules?” The study analyses three key subtasks: (i) transformation of the IFC of the construction project; (ii) regulations formalisation; (iii) conformance checking reasoning. While analysing the IFC model redundancy and/or insufficiency for conformance checking reasoning, we suggest an intermediate RDF-based model, semantically en-riched and regulation-oriented. The regulation formalisation is studied under two viewpoints: the formalisation of pa-per-based regulation texts to be automatically used in reasoning and the development of the representation of ontology-based regulations. The construction rules are represented as a set of rules which premise and conclusion are RDF graphs. The conformance checking starts from the alignment of the construction project ontologies to the prem-ise/conclusion ontologies of the construction rule. Then, the checking in construction is seen as reasoning in terms of the corresponding RDF graphs. The paper concludes with a preliminary conceptual framework based on Semantic Web technologies modeling the conformance checking problem, as well as the technical solutions for its implementation. The respective architecture and future challenges of the work are also discussed.

Keywords: conformance checking, ontologies in construction, e-regulations, construction project conformance to regulations, semantic web in construction

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf (428,706 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2007 (browse)
Cluster:
Class:
Similar papers:
Sound: N/A.


B Vladimir, T Maile, J T. O’Donnell, C M Rose, N Mrazovi_

DATA ENVIRONMENTS AND PROCESSING IN SEMI-AUTOMATED SIMULATION WITH ENERGYPLUS

Abstract: Building energy performance (BEP) simulation is increasingly used worldwide to quantitatively justify building design decisions and building operations strategies. It is becoming increasingly obvious that the results of such simulation are often questionable, cannot be trusted, and may lead to wrong decisions. Poor simulation model definition and the use of inappropriately acquired and transformed data are two of the most common causes of this. The use of LBNL methodology for semi-automated BEP simulation data input automates data acquisition and transformation, which removes human decision making from the simulation input data definition process. The first of the three major software components (the Geometry Simplification Tool or GST) is already in use. Work on the second component (an interoperable HVAC graphic user interface for EnergyPlus) is under development. The third component (an internal loads generation tool) will be developed in the near future. The original HVAC GUI for EnergyPlus component has evolved into a BEP simulation platform code-named Mojito. A new internal data model which defines all object/attribute/ relationship sets used in BEP simulation, called SimModel, is the central feature of Mojito. Modeling imprecision is very characteristic of geometry representation in building models submitted by the Architecture-Engineering-Construction-Owners-Operator (AECOO) industry. This, and the lagging and very slow development of CAD utilities that can generate higher-level space boundaries needed in BEP simulation, has forced the development of a new tool (SBT) that calculates higher-level space boundaries from IFC-compliant definition of basic building geometry from any model-based CAD tool. It has also forced the addition of new data transformation rules in GST. This paper describes the principles and high-level views of SimModel, SBT and GST internal architectures, and discusses some of the model and tool functionalities. It also provides a brief summary of quality assessment characteristic of building models generated in the AECOO industry.

Keywords: Building data, semi-automated simulation, simulation software, energy simulation data model, data transformation.

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf (1,506,890 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2011 (browse)
Cluster:
Class:
Similar papers:
Sound: N/A.


Chege L W

E-commerce and value chain management – the prospects and challenges for the South African construction industry

Abstract: The utilization of e-commerce in business has been the subject of widespread and continued debate in recent years. The growth of e-commerce has been phenomena1 and it is radically transforming the way companies are doing business in all sectors, and the construction industry is no exception. Value chain management is an important concept in construction as it encompasses the activities that involve the transformation of inputs into outputs and the management of projects from development to final commissioning in order to maximize the value of a project. This paper will look at the potential applications of e-commerce in the South African construction industry with particular emphasis on their impact on value chain management. The potential applications to be reviewed are the development of electronic tendering procedures; electronic systems for the exchange of information on an ongoing project; and the electronic buying and selling of goods and services for utilization in the construction process. These e-commerce applications will invariably play an important role in enhancing the management of the value chain through improvements in the overall process from the initial tendering stage. Although e-commerce offers tremendous opportunities to the South African construction industry, these opportunities are not without challenges. This paper will also seek to address these challenges which include the issue of how to create an enabling environment to allow Small Medium and Micro Enterprises (SMMEs) to reap the potential benefits that e-commerce has to offer; and the issue of protection of privacy, confidentiality and anonymity of users of e-commerce systems.

Keywords:

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf (157,123 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2001 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.commerce (0.121775) class.environment (0.033381) class.impact (0.024337)
Similar papers:
Sound: read aloud.

Permission to reproduce these documents have been graciously provided by CSIR Building and Construction Technology. The assistance of the editors, Mr. Gustav Coetzee and Mr. Frances Boshoff, is gratefully appreciated.


Cheng J,Deng Y,Du Q

Mapping between BIM models and 3d GIS city models of different levels of detail

Abstract: Modeling the built environment of a city digitally in three dimensions can support navigation, urban planning, disaster management, and energy consumption analysis. City Geography Markup Language (CityGML) was developed in recent years as a Geographic Information System (GIS) data standard to represent the geometry and geographical information of buildings in digital 3D city models. CityGML supports modeling on various Levels of Detail (LoDs) from simple box models to models with interior partitions. This paper presents the theoretical framework that we have developed for mapping between Building Information Modeling (BIM) models in the Industry Foundation Classes (IFC) format and CityGML models of different LoDs. The framework consists of two major parts – (1) transformation between BIM models and high level CityGML LoD4 models, and (2) harmonization among the four LoDs of CityGML. For the first part, a reference ontology was developed to transfer semantic information between BIM models in the IFC format and CityGML models. To reduce the file size of the generated CityGML models, a new geometric transformation algorithm was developed for the mapping from Swept Solid or Constructive Solid Geometry (CSG) representations, which are commonly used in BIM models, to Boundary Representation (BRep) which is used in CityGML models. For the second part, schema mediation techniques are used to convert CityGML models from one LoD to another LoD. Based on the reference ontology, an application domain extension (ADE) called “Semantic City Model (SCM)” was developed for CityGML. The SCM ADE enriches CityGML models by providing more semantic information such as the linkage relationship between walls and building stories. This paper presents the developed mapping framework with an illustrative example of a residential building.

Keywords: 3D city models,Building Information Modeling (BIM),Geographic Information System (GIS),Industry Foundation Classes (IFC),Schema mapping

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf (807,385 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: convr:2013 (browse)
Cluster:
Class:
Similar papers:
Sound: N/A.


De la Hoz Sánchez D, Ballester Muñoz F

Internet strategies. it's time for the 'silent' internet.

Abstract: Internet is here to stay and guide the transition to the Information and Knowledge Society, as abreakthrough model, and as a tool for managing current businesses more efficiently. This is arevolution but also an evolution that has to do with the interiorization of Internet: what we call'Business Internetisation'. It's a silent, but firm process of transforming companies to a digitalcontext. This is part of I-CONSneT investigation project that will present a competitive scenariodescription for construction companies in the new economy.This paper reviews, based on I-CONSneT, the new competitive context and formulates an integralInternet strategy to help managers clarify and negotiate this new business scenario, entering on the'Internetisation' era. The paper also reviews Spanish construction initiatives on e-business.

Keywords: Internet, e-business, I-strategy, 'Internetisation', e-culture, 'silent' transformation, digitalbusiness, I-experience, e-business future.

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf (235,146 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: ecce:2001 (browse)
Cluster:
Class:
Similar papers:
Sound: read aloud.


Dennis Peeten, Herm Hofmeyer

Visualisation and Research Strategy for Computational Spatial and Structural Design Interaction

Abstract: At the department of Architecture, Building and Planning of the Eindhoven University of Technology, a new research project has recently been initiated with the goal to develop a research engine for studying the interaction of spatial and structural design processes. Each design process will be implemented as two separate configurable transformation steps; a conversion step and an optimisation step. The idea is to start with an initial spatial design and measure how the design changes after subsequent iterations through the conversion and optimisation processes. A significant part of the spatial-to-structural conversion step together with a first version of a visualisation tool have been implemented and both perform as expected. During the course of the research project, a first version of the complete research engine will be developed. The performance of this first version will be compared to case studies. Based on these results, adjustments and/or additions to the research engine’s transformations will be made. The final version of the research engine will also be used to experiment on academic designs in order to develop insights in the fundamental relation between space and structure.

Keywords: spatial design, structural design, computational design, visualisation

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf (257,824 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2010 (browse)
Cluster:
Class:
Similar papers:
Sound: N/A.


Elvekrok D R, Johansen B W, Syvertsen T G, Totland T

World wide web as a coordination technology for knowledge work

Abstract: This paper will bring some understanding of the World Wide Web as an information and coordination technology, and suggest some principles and metaphors for Web working. The suggestions will be underpinned by recent experiences from a collective Web-working project, and a transformation of a technical standard into hypertext format. Some ideas and visions for future developments based on the new medium are presented. World Wide Web is more than a tool or a technology, it is a new medium based on a set of very simple principles that enable us to cope with a vast Ocean of information and knowledge. The basics of World Wide Web and HTML (Hypertext Markup Language) will be explained. A small-scale experiment in collective writing in Web will be reported. The task was development of the PAKT Yearbook of 1994, where a dozen of contributors worked concurrently on individual pieces around a shared Yearbook structure. This small project may in some sense resemble an engineering project, where many discipline experts are performing individual tasks around a shared goal and work breakdown structure. The experiment was based on use of Microsoft Internet Assistant which provides a simple add-on that makes Microsoft Word a combined Web reader and writer. Using this interface to the Web, working there is as simple as traditional word-processing. This mode of working can easily be expanded with any kind of tool based on the same concepts of process linking. There is, however, no support for the work processes associated with creating the product (in our case a Yearbook), or the organization of the processes. Based on our experiences, we suggest some metaphors and practical approaches to efficient Web working. Another experiment has been in the domain of technical standards. A couple of existing, paper- based standards from the petroleum industry have been converted to HTML, with cross-references transferred to active hyper-links. Using WWW as a one-way information server and as a shared working space will be illustrated. We see at least three future aspects of Web development; active objects replace static information, information structures will be supplemented by knowledge processes (enterprise modelling), and the information economy will evolve based on integrated flow of transactions.

Keywords:

DOI:

Full text: content.pdf (1,745,393 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:1995 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.roadmaps (0.065275) class.collaboration (0.038981) class.economic (0.022244)
Similar papers:
Sound: read aloud.

Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by the Stanford University, USA. The support of the editors, particularly Prof. Fischer is gratefully appreciated.


For more results click below:

 

hosted by University of Ljubljana



includes

W78




© itc.scix.net 2003
this is page 1 show page 2 show page 3 show page 4 Home page of this database login Powered by SciX Open Publishing Services 1.002 February 16, 2003