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_. Jarský

Modelling of buildings and projects with utility assessment

Abstract: The paper describes the methodology of computer modelling of the building process of facilities and projects with utility assessment and the main principles of the integrated cost estimation, project management and quality assurance microcomputer based system developed recently. This expert system is based on quick modeling of the building process by use of typical construction technology network diagrams, which can be prepared in advance. The typical network diagrams can be modified according to the spatial conditions of a certain building and to the amount of construction works and materials. For utility assessment a vector of 10 main aspects (criteria) was created with a common measure unit and certain level of importance each. A database of construction processes was created including the aspects for utility assessment. Thanks to these features the model of the building process can be made about 50 times quicker than current project management systems and it can be used for bidding, project planning and management and utility assessment.

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Full text: content.pdf (586,023 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2009 (browse)
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A Francis, E Miresco

Case Studies for the Planning and Monitoring of Unit- and Fixed-Price Contracts Using Project Scheduling Software

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Full text: content.pdf (939,210 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2014 (browse)
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D Browne, K Menzel

Method for Validation of Building Simulation Results using Sensor Data

Abstract: In general, current Building Energy Simulation Tools are used for pre-construction design and comparison of designs rather than a full exact varying representation of reality. To provide the best level of detail full CFD analysis for the entire building would be required. However this is currently by far outside the scope of current computing power for a building energy system. Because these simulation tools are designed for comparison of potential designs and because of the difficulty in predicting occupant behaviour, very often the predicted results do not correlate with the real actual performance when buildings are in operation. From project experience encountered in the EU FP7 IntUBE project, a deficit has been encountered whereby the correlation between simulation results and real measured data is not entirely accurate. This paper discusses a method of validation, which will provide a means of comparing measured data (e.g. sensors and weather data), and simulated data (e.g. near future simulations). This method for validation of building simulation results initially involves a comparison of data from building simulation and respective measured sensor readings. From this comparison, value is added from correction of simulation results, and/or input to simulation parameters. Further worth can also be provided by gaining knowledge for creation of simulation profiles which are difficult to predict before construction & operation. Additional value can also be derived from identifying conditions of poor results and relevant factors which can be corrected. Simulation data and actual data is available from a housing unit in Barcelona Spain and research building in Cork Ireland.The expected result to be derived from this method is to give an indication of quality of simulated data results and provide feedback. If the difference between simulated and real data is too large, steps to improve results will be suggested. In future it is envisioned that automated adjustments may performed to simulation inputs to correct results. Aside from near future simulation validation, the tool may be able to provide long term commissioning feedback to detect and alert users to long term degradation of systems and possible maintenance or repair remedies.

Keywords: Simulation, Data Modelling, Validation

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Full text: content.pdf (109,859 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2011 (browse)
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E Hjelseth

Modular BIM Guidelines

Abstract: This paper presents a concept for development of modular BIM Building Information Models –guidelines based on a knowledge management perspective. BIM guidelines are at present mainly developed by large companies and organisations for their own needs and processes. Due to the high cost and time consumed in their development, these are often used in projects and processes which they are not optimized for. Turning the development process around allows practitioners to start by specifying relevant information in “information modules”. An information module, IM, is a unit of information for a specified purpose, and can be both pre-defined or develop as a part or the design process, and collected into libraries. The IM’s can then be dynamically assembled into BIM guidelines. Use of the principles of modular BIM guidelines enables the AEC/FM companies to develop their own guidelines adapted to theirs requirements. Starting with specifying information modules can therefore be an initiative for development of active knowledge managements systems.

Keywords: BIM, Knowledge representation, Knowledge management, IDM, Standardization

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Full text: content.pdf (262,917 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2011 (browse)
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E. Ergen & G. Guven

Assessing the Need for Storing Data on Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) Tags

Abstract: Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) technology has been used within multiple research projects for identification and tracking of components in the construction industry. Although RFID has on-board data storage capacity, not all the studies used this capacity to store some object-related data directly in the tag. In some of the case studies performed, RFID tag was used only as an identifier for tracking various objects or for matching the related object with the additional information that is stored in a remote database. In this paper, the goal is to determine under which conditions an RFID tag needs to be used as a local data storage unit. To identify these conditions, previous research studies that were performed in the construction industry were investigated. The characteristics of cases that were described in the studies were identified and data storage needs were determined. Also, types of information items that were stored in the tags were identified. The results show in which types of cases RFID was used to store additional data. In addition, the advantages and disadvantages of storing data on the tag and on a remote database were discussed.

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Full text: content.pdf (78,306 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2009 (browse)
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F Qin, F Fan, Z Li, H Qian, X Jin

Thermal Simulation of Hydration Heat in Slab of Taishan Nuclear Power Plant Unit 2

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Full text: content.pdf (576,656 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2014 (browse)
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Friedman A, Medek L

Evaluation of existing CAD programs used by clients in housing design and marketing

Abstract: There exists a knowledge gap between architects and buyers in the North American homebuilding industry. Mass produced housing is commonly conceived for a user whose needs are unknown to the designer during the design process. In a built model unit, potential home-buyers canappreciate how their future home will look prior to the purchasing decision. Changing this process, by allowing the user to participate in the design process, can only be accepted once both the builder's and the buyers' objectives are satisfied. We wanted to explore the possibility of having clients directly involved in their home design for the purpose of improving both user satisfaction as well as unit marketing potential. Given the fact that computers have become more accessible toboth designers and the public at large, we assumed that users can operate a pre-prepared program by themselves, on which they can make limited design decisions. In our preliminary research, we found several software companies that are already marketing such programs. The objectives of our research were to determine the merit of these programs and to establish their potential in order to narrow the knowledge gap between builders/ architects and clients in the marketing and the construction of housing. We found that these programs do not adequately familiarize the user with the manipulation of the software or hardware systems. Their operation is rather complex for the lay person and better documentation and instructions are needed if these programs are to be integrated in the future marketing of housing.

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Full text: content.pdf (1,038,057 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:1992 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.software development (0.021363) class.synthesis (0.018133) class.software-machine (0.016713)
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Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by Research Press of the National Research Council of Canada. The support of the editor, Dr. Dana Vanier, is gratefully appreciated.


Georg Ferdinand Schneider, Yashar Kalantari, Georgios D. Kontes, Gunnar Grün and Simone Steiger

A Platform for Automated Technical Building Management Services Using Ontology

Abstract: The deployment of technical building management services is a requirement to further reduce energy demand of future and existing buildings. Automating the process of configuring and deploying technical building management services such as fault detection and diagnosis of technical equipment seems to be a promising path to intensify the adoption of these services. In this work we present a data processing and analytics execution platform which allows the deployment of ontology-based, automated technical building management services on a large-scale. We present the platform architecture and results from a reference implementation performing rule-based fault detection on offline air handling unit data.

Keywords: Technical Building Management, Service-Oriented Architecture SOA, Fault Detection and Diagnosis, Ontology

DOI: https://doi.org/10.24928/JC3-2017/0279

Full text: content.pdf (954,131 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: jc3:2017 (browse)
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Lee, Sanghoon; Turkaslan-Bulbul, Muhsine Tanyel; and Akin, Omer

The Development of an Augmented Reality-Based Data Visualization System for Commissioning of Air Handling Units

Abstract: This paper discusses the development of an Augmented Reality-based data visualization system that supports commissioning HVAC systems during construction, occupancy, and operations phases. Commissioning is a process that generates a significant amount of data. Therefore a Building Commissioning data model has been developed to effectively manage such data and facilitate the computational support for commissioning work. One of the challenges of this model-based approach has been to reduce the inefficiency caused by the disparate and multiple attributes of the Building Commissioning data. In order to meet this challenge, we aim to develop an Augmented Reality-based data visualization interface which can automatically detects a piece of equipment and visualizes all necessary data relevant to the particular equipment for the commissioning procedures. This paper focuses on the functional requirements and system architecture needed to design such an interface.

Keywords: Augmented Reality, Data Visualization, Building Commissioning Data Model, Air Handling Unit, and

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Full text: content.pdf (264,748 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: convr:2007 (browse)
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Lomas D W, Arics Ahkis

Construction industry education: new approaches to utlllslng the world-wide-web

Abstract: In the past decade the phenomenal growth area has been in the area of Information Technology (IT). This has been experienced around the world, as people come to grips with all the new means 01 communication, such as electronic mail (e-mail), World-wide-web 0 and the Internet. This paper will present the latest computer based teaching developments from the Hong Kong Polytechnic University. The examples will be in the field of construction, although the applications and techniques, could be used on a wide range of other industries. The Department of Building and Real Estate, together with other University departments (Education Development Unit and Building Services Engineering) have carried out a number of pilot studies, using WWW for tutorial teaching, and also computer-aided teaching for construction industly students.

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Series: ecce:1997 (browse)
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