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Computer aided conformance checking

Abstract: In the building process a number of problems exist with regardtobuilding regulations, causing the conformance checking process to be an island in the building process. This paper discusses an approach that enables us to perform computer aided conformance checking and to integrate the conformance checking process in the building process. The approach is based on the use of product models. This paper discusses theoretical as well as implementationaspects. The paper is an extended abstract of the Ph.D. thesis written by the author (De Waard 92).

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Full text: content.pdf (1,550,159 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:1992 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.legal (0.035798) class.synthesis (0.030841) class.communication (0.017275)
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Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by Research Press of the National Research Council of Canada. The support of the editor, Dr. Dana Vanier, is gratefully appreciated.


A Laaroussi, A Zarli & JC Bignon

An approach to modelling the dynamics of the design process in architecture

Abstract: This study presents a brainstorming on the dynamics of the design process in architecture. It is motivated by the needs and the evolution of the professional practice, and based on their study: it is exposed to allow us to learn the appropriate lessons for a future modeling of this dynamics. We will introduce our working hypothesis of the component dynamics and suggest a model for dynamics of design process in architecture.

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Series: w78:2005 (browse)
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Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by the Technische Universität Dresden.


A. Al-Bazi, N. Dawood & Z. Khan

Development of Hybrid Simulation and Genetic Algorithms System for Solving Complex Crew Allocation Problems

Abstract: This paper presents an innovative approach to solving complex crew allocation problems in any labour-intensive industry. This has been achieved by combining simulation with Genetic Algorithm (GA). The integrated system determines the least costly and most productive crews to be allocated on any produc-tion processes. Discrete Event Simulation methodology is used to simulate a manufacturing system. A special PROCESS module is developed to overcome limitation of the used simulation software that appears when us-ing normal PROCESS module. A concept of multi-layer chromosome is proposed to store different data sets in multi-layers structure. GA operators were developed to suit such chromosome structure. As a case study, a sleeper precast manufacturing system is chosen to prove the concept of the proposed allocation system. The results showed that adopting Manipulating a number of multi-skilled workers to be allocated among different production processes had a substantial impact on reducing total allocation cost, process-waiting time, and op-timising resource utilisation. 3D visualisation is presented.

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Full text: content.pdf (564,663 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2009 (browse)
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Ahmed Laaroussi, Bruno Fiès, Rémi Vankeisbelckt, Julien Hans

Ontology-aided FMEA for construction products

Abstract: The goal of improving the quality and the maintenance of building products, and the will to integrate the sustainable development objectives led us to propose an original method based on the use and adaptation of the Failure Modes Effects and Criticality Analysis (FMEA). This method relies among others on ontology use. It facilitates the FMEA proceeding. This paper aims to introduce innovative software specifically developed to perform more easily FMEA on building components. This software takes advantages of a structured knowledge base and an inference rule engine that allow a complete and formal description of the product to be analysed and an exhaustive analysis of all failures (degradations) that may occur.

Keywords: FMEA, ontological approach, knowledge capitalisation, degradation analysis, construction product

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Series: w78:2007 (browse)
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Alexander J, Coble R, Crawford J, Drogemuller R, Leslie H, Newton P, Wilson B, Yum Kwok-Keung

Information and communication in construction : closing the loop

Abstract: Both nationally and internationally, the architecture, engineering and construction (AEC) sector is highly fragmented : it is dominated by small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs), the nature of information and knowledge can be dispersed among firms and organisations, and consortia are frequently formed from geographically dispersed firms. In recognition of the potential improvements to be gained through an integrated approach to project information used throughout the design, documentation, construction and operation processes, substantial research is underway in Australia to "close the loop" of information flows between designers and constructors. The paper will explore and discuss both the technology platform in terms of information and communications technology (mobile, high-speed and wide area networking linking the design and engineering offices with the construction site) and the information platform in terms of the content of communications between project stakeholders and the requisite information (traditional spatial as well as non-spatial data) of key concern to the stakeholders at various stages of the project lifecycle. The paradigm shift that has occurred over recent years from stand-alone personal computing (which reinforced fragmentation) to mobile and Wide Area networked computing now provides a platform capable of promoting integration, accessibility and co-operation within the sector with attendant gains in efficiency. A minimum requirement to achieve these gains is access to the right information (not just simple data) at the desired level of scale and detail for a particular stakeholder’s view - information which once collected can be stored and refined and then held for use elsewhere on the project without loss and without the need for subsequent re-entry. The information needs to be available quickly and easily, that is at the right time and in the right location for maximum benefit and project efficiency. Demonstration collaborative systems to support interactive Computer Aided Design and information exchange between project stakeholders such as architects, various engineers (electrical, hydaulic, mechanical, structural) and project managers, in an innovative collaborative manner have become available to bring dispersed project members together electronically. Such systems allow project members attached to a network to undertake a range of information access and exchange from simple e-mail; through on-site access to central project data sources via handheld computers; right through to the use of optional live (or pre-recorded) video to enhance collaboration. Using communications infrastructure, this functionality can be shared in various ways - in a corporate-wide environment between regional and/or interstate offices within a company, or in a consortium situation (between offices of a consortium working together on a specific construction project). The questions then arise as to how such systems fit into industry practice, and how the industry might adapt to embrace new opportunities provided by such technological advances. Ease of access to up-to-date, accurate project information for a range of project stakeholders is being extended through research in the US and Australia to close the loop between some of the stakeholders, and this will be discussed in detail in the paper. As well, the progress of industry-based support for a level of interoperability for building and construction information by organisations such as the International Alliance for Interoperability (IAI Australasian chapter) will also be discussed, plus the likely impact of the adoption of Industry Foundation Classes in the Australian building and construction industry in areas such as the design life for buildings based on durability of materials.

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Full text: content.pdf (719,511 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:1998 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.communication (0.057235) class.environment (0.023003) class.synthesis (0.022896)
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Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden. The assistance of the editors, Prof. Bo-Christer Björk and Dr. Adina Jägbeck, is gratefully appreciated.


Aouad G, Cooper R, Kagioglou M, Hinks J, Sexton M

A synchronised process/IT model to support the co- maturation of processes and IT in the construction sector

Abstract: In recent years many efforts had taken place in order to develop process and IT maps within the construction sector. However, the subject of co-maturation between IT and the process has not been given enough attention. This has resulted in the development of impractical solutions because of an apparent lack of balance between the IT and process capabilities. For instance, some organisations in the construction sector have adopted the rapid prototyping concept which is widely used within the manufacturing sector without even investing in 3D modelling and VR technologies which are the most appropriate for this task. Paradoxically, some organisations have invested in these technologies, but rapid prototyping is non existent. This paper addresses the issue of co-maturation between the process and IT in order to establish a balanced profile. The work is based on the CMM (Capability Maturity Model) model which was developed by the Software Engineering Institute at Carnegie Mellon University in order to develop software for the US government, particularly to be used by the Department of Defence. The CMM is a five-level model which include ad-hoc, repeatable, defined, managed and optimised stages. The model is designed so that capabilities at lower stages provide progressively stronger foundations for higher stages, reducing the change management risks. Each development stage - or "maturity level" distinguishes an organisation’s process or IT capability. This paper builds on the work achieved within the generic design and construction process protocol (GDCPP) which is being undertaken at the university of Salford. The main contribution of this paper is a conceptual model of co-maturation between IT and process. A synchorised IT/process model will be presented and discussed. This model is being developed through knowledge obtained form the industrial collaborators of the GDCPP project.

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Full text: content.pdf (120,604 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:1998 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.communication (0.029904) class.processing (0.022049) class.impact (0.010457)
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Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden. The assistance of the editors, Prof. Bo-Christer Björk and Dr. Adina Jägbeck, is gratefully appreciated.


B Giel, R R A Issa, R Liu

Perceptions of Organizational BIM Maturity Variables in The US AECO Industry

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Full text: content.pdf (169,159 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2012 (browse)
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Becerik B

A review on past, present and future of web based project management & collaboration tools and their adoption by the US AEC industry

Abstract: The term "Construction Project Extranet" (CPE) in this paper refers to Internet sites, which offer communication platforms, project management functionalities and hosted collaboration spaces for Architecture, Engineering and Construction (AEC) Industry projects. The paper focuses on web-based CPE offerings and examines in-depth analysis of the past, present and future of CPE solutions for design and construction projects as implemented by the AEC industry in United States. The paper builds upon previous research as well as structured interviews that were conducted with technology providers, users, and experts. The findings from the interviews and literature search were analyzed to address these questions: How has CPE technology been developed? How much are these systems accepted and used? What are the barriers to widespread adoption? How will the market for such systems evolve? The main goals of this paper are to fulfill the need of research related to the developments in this field, to provide a concise, updated overview of existing implementation practices and the current situation of CPE market, to discuss the reasons for slow adoption of CPE technology by the industry, and to understand the adoption and technology development patterns to forecast the future trends in this field.

Keywords: adoption, AEC Industry, communication, extranets, information technology, and web-based project management

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Full text: content.pdf (385,542 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: itaec:2004 (browse)
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Carter G, Smith S

IT tool for construction site safety management

Abstract: The UK construction industry kills some 80 employees per year. This corresponds to a fatal accident rate of roughly 4.4 per 100,000 employees. Furthermore, major injury and 3-day injury rates are approximately 400 and 900 per 100,000 employees, respectively. Figures for the rest of Europe are similar, if not worse. It has long been realised that the reduction of hazardous events is fundamental to good construction safety management because these events have the potential to cause accidents, which may result in injuries and fatalities. However, there have been examples within the industry where hazard identification and the subsequent assessment of risk have been carried out by people ill equipped to identify all the hazards, assess their risks and suggest appropriate responses. Our research aim is to develop a knowledge-based system to aid in site safety management. The system will consist of a centralised database containing the combined knowledge and experience of all personnel within the company. This database is accessed via a user interface, which takes the form of a dynamic data-driven website and consists of four main applications that focus on the main areas of site safety management. The first application concerns creating and maintaining a company risk log, which can be used to identify hazards, assess risk, establish adequate hazard responses and report risk reduction performance. The second application is intended to aid in the method statement preparation process. Hazard referencing to tasks within the methodology and assigning significance values to tasks based upon assessed risk are the main features of this application, which should improve the level of hazard identification and enhance safe systems of work on site. Our system relies heavily upon historical data to provide an objective and dynamic evaluation of risk, rather than current subjective and static estimations of risk using the traditional method of risk matrices. Thus the other two applications are concerned mainly with entering data from accident reports and site safety tours into the central database. The other function of these applications will be to perform detailed analysis of accident causes, which will help safety managers to better respond to hazards to prevent future accidents. We are currently at the stage of developing a prototype version of the system. Field trials will be conducted between February and May for validation of the prototype. Validation will take the form of analysing method statements and risk assessments before and after implementation if the system to determine its effect on improving hazard identification, the assessment of risk, hazard response and accident rates. Qualitative evaluation will also be carried out. Questionnaires to, and interviews with, safety managers will give an indication of the usefulness of the system from a management and operational perspective. Doing the same thing with site foremen and operatives will allow us to determine the effectiveness of the outputs of the system, i.e. method statements and risk assessments, in enhancing safe systems of work.

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Full text: content.pdf (1,139,352 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2001 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.man-software (0.026762) class.social (0.018951) class.impact (0.007440)
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Permission to reproduce these documents have been graciously provided by CSIR Building and Construction Technology. The assistance of the editors, Mr. Gustav Coetzee and Mr. Frances Boshoff, is gratefully appreciated.


Choudhury I

International construction projects: effects of cross-cultural training on the productivity of project Personnel

Abstract: The purpose of this study was to examine the perceived effects of cross-cultural training of project personnel, involved with the construction of international projects by US contractors, on their productivity. It is indicated by a number of studies that cross-cultural training of the project personnel is an important factor for successful implementation of construction projects away from home. Some other studies, particularly related to international business, suggest that important issues for a meaningful cross-cultural training include an exposure to the prevailing environmental, economic, political, linguistic, political, and technological factors of the host country. The study investigated whether these factors are relevant for international construction with reference to the project personnel employed by the US contractors operating in an international environment. The study population consisted of US contractors who operate globally. Relevant data was collected by mail using a survey instrument. Sample size of the study was 35 contractors. The data was analyzed using multiple regression technique. The findings generated from the analysis of the data indicated that the effects of the knowledge of environmental, technological, economic, linguistic, labor, and social issues related to the host country were statistically significant on the productivity of the project personnel employed by the contractors for implementation of international construction projects.

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Full text: content.pdf (202,293 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2000 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.social (0.039175) class.economic (0.018187) class.strategies (0.016599)
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Permission to reproduce these documents have been graciously provided by Icelandic Building Research Institute. The assistance of the editor, Mr. Gudni Gudnason, is gratefully appreciated


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