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Ageliki Valavanoglou, Danijel Rebolj and Detlef Heck

Construction Delay and Disruption Claims Assisted Through BIM Technology

Abstract: Construction projects are frequently subjected to delay and disruption leading to dispute between project participants regarding the entitlement to compensation. Challenges associated with the analysis of delay and disruption and the subsequent preparation of the claim conducted by a forensic analysis expert include the difficult retrieval of scattered, unstructured information and lack of adequate documentation, leading to weak analysis and therefore insufficient proof of causation and entitlement.This paper illustrates the chronological information generation regarding delay and disruption in the construction phase proposing a framework based on Building Information Modelling and structured information integration, to facilitate easy filing and retrieval of relevant documentation for claim preparation.

Keywords: Delay and Disruption Claims, Documentation, Forensic Analysis, Building Information Modelling, BIM Collaboration Format

DOI: https://doi.org/10.24928/JC3-2017/0192

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C Klinzmann & D Hosser

Probabilistic Building Inspection and Life Assessment - a computer program for reliability based system assessment

Abstract: The collaborative research centre (CRC) 477 explores innovative methods for structural health monitoring. In project field A1, methods and strategies, the modular knowledge-based computer program PROBILAS (Probabilistic Building Inspection and Life ASsessment) is developed. Its main focus lies on the optimization of structural health monitoring measures. One opportunity to optimize the monitoring process is to concentrate the monitoring measures on a few critical weak points of a structure. These critical weak points are identified by using methods of the system and reliability theory. Additionally these methods provide the opportunity to evaluate and to assess the probability of failure of a system. This paper concentrates on the implementation of the described methods into PROBILAS. Especially the database model, its integration into the program modules and the calculation procedure used for reliability analysis are discussed further.

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Full text: content.pdf (329,245 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2005 (browse)
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Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by the Technische Universität Dresden.


Khalfan M M A, Anumba C J

Implementation of concurrent engineering in construction - readiness assessment

Abstract: "There is growing interest in the adoption of Concurrent Engineering (CE) in the Construction Industry. CE has the potential to make construction projects less fragmented, improve project quality, reduce project duration and reduce total project cost. Also, the urgent need to improve the performance of construction can be achieved during the design process by concurrently considering key aspects of the construction project’s downstream phases. It is evident that by adopting CE, the software and manufacturing industries have significantly improved their business processes. While Concurrent engineering (CE) is gaining acceptance, some implementation efforts have not realised their full potential for reducing costs, reducing time, and increasing efficiency, effectiveness and performance for product development efforts. This is due in part to weak planning to support the implementation. One method that has been used successfully to improve CE implementation planning is to conduct an organisation readiness assessment prior to the introduction of CE. This helps to investigate the extent to which the organisation is ready to adopt Concurrent Engineering. Therefore, in order to facilitate the adoption of the CE concept in construction, it is necessary to assess the extent to which firms in the construction industry are ready for the adoption of CE. This can be done by carrying out Readiness Assessment for any construction organisation before the adoption of CE. Readiness assessment tools and models have been developed and used in other industries such as the manufacturing and software engineering industries. This paper discusses Concurrent Engineering and its application to construction. It includes a comparative review of existing readiness assessment tools and models that have been successfully used in the manufacturing and IT sectors. It argues that readiness assessment of the construction supply chain is a necessity for the implementation of CE in construction and assesses the applicability of existing tools and models to the construction industry. A new readiness assessment model for the construction industry called “CERAMConstruct” is presented, with details of the development of the model and its associated questionnaire, assessment methodology, and case studies. The paper concludes that the CERAMConstruct model offers useful benefits in the implementation of CE in construction. Aspects of further work to be done are also outlined."

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Full text: content.pdf (385,123 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2000 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.economic (0.012585) class.strategies (0.009727) class.commerce (0.008958)
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Permission to reproduce these documents have been graciously provided by Icelandic Building Research Institute. The assistance of the editor, Mr. Gudni Gudnason, is gratefully appreciated


Psunder I, Rebolj D

Product model based quality management system

Abstract: The idea of this research is to build an integrated computer aided quality management system of building projects. Making use of expert knowledge, we are building an information system which will supervise, in each phase of a building project, the fulfilment of the required conditions for undisturbed and quality project continuation. Finally the quality control system will be supported by a computer program which is based on an expert system. In the basic version of the program the user will be guided through the control sheets so that the required control data will be collected. In the case of unfulfilment of quality conditions, the system will suggest possible solutions based on experiences. The program will compare present project to past ones and determine weak points of the project to assure total quality. The program will also help to evaluate statistically the project success, to compare it to other projects and to determine the weakest points of the project to assure total quality. In the upgraded version of development the program will be supported by a product model of the building with aim to reach integrated quality management of building projects.

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Full text: content.pdf (74,082 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:1998 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.synthesis (0.036443) class.analysis (0.019744) class.software development (0.017198)
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Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden. The assistance of the editors, Prof. Bo-Christer Björk and Dr. Adina Jägbeck, is gratefully appreciated.


R Schnetgoeke & D Hosser

Application of reliability-based system assessment using a bridge example

Abstract: Structural health monitoring during the life-cycle of a structure is necessary to ensure permanently the bearing capability and the serviceability respectively. Differences from the designed properties can be assessed consequently and therefore rehabilitation measurements can start. For the minimisation of the structural health monitoring measures and the cost involved, the monitoring measures must be concentrated on the critical weak points of the structure. Therefore the knowledge-based system PROBILAS (PRObabilis-tic Building Inspection and Life ASsessment) is developed. By the combination of recognized procedures of reliability and system analysis in PROBILAS a continuous revaluation of the building and the identification of the failure-relevant parts is possible. This article illustrates the building assessment process with PROBILAS using a bridge as an example. The process includes repeated evaluation of the system and the focussing of both the stochastic an the physical models on the failure-relevant parts of the system.

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Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by the Technische Universität Dresden.


Rebolj D, Psunder I

Computer aided quality management of building projects

Abstract: Building projects are unique business events and need a sophisticated quality management to be technically and economically efficient. Experiences have shown that early recognition of bad quality and errors substantially lowers the costs of error elimination. Costs of mistake made in the phase of conception are multiplied when transposed to subsequent phases. The aim of this research was to build an integrated computer aided quality management of building projects. Making use of expert experience, we are building an information system which will supervise the fulfillment of the required conditions for undisturbed and quality project continuation. The quality control system will be supported by a computer program which is based on the conventional expert system. In the first version of the system the user will be guided through the control sheets so that the required control data will be collected. In the case of unfulfillment of quality conditions, the system will suggest possible solutions based on experiences. The program will compare present project to past ones and determine weak points of the project to assure total quality. In the next version of development the program will be supported by a product model of the building with aim to reach integrated quality management of building projects. In the contribution the concept of the relevant paper is presented. As results the overview through present situation in quality management of building projects (1) and the concept of the planned information system are shown (2).

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Series: ecce:1997 (browse)
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Salvaneschi P, Lazzari M

Weak information systems for technical data management

Abstract: Daily operation of structures and plants requires to manage and integrate large amounts of technical information. Existing approaches span from “no integration” to “strong integration” based on a common data base or product model. We propose concepts and technology to develop types of information systems in the middle. We call them “Weak Information Systems”. The basic concept is to add to the layer of existing information a new layer of multiple partial models of products and processes. INTERNET technologies are well suited for implementation. An example of information system for Dams management is presented.

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Series: ecce:1997 (browse)
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Ulrich Hartmann, Petra von Both

Metrics for the Analysis of Product Model Complexity

Abstract: Today we see several product model standards getting more and more corpulent by absorbing concepts of neighboring domains, but behind the good intentions of getting ‘complete’ the perils of complexity are lurk-ing. Raising computer power gives us the means of handling large digital models, but the overall situation resembles the scenery of the mid-1970ties, where the software industry ran into the so-called software cri-sis. Edsger Dijkstra put it quite bluntly: “as long as there were no machines, programming was no problem at all; when we had a few weak computers, programming became a mild problem, and now we have gigan-tic computers, programming has become an equally gigantic problem” . Pursuing traditional concepts with growing tool power may uncover structural deficits not anticipated before.It’s in the nature of complexity to have no single ‘magic’ number, representing the complexity of a general system, at hand. The comparison of systems complexity on a universal level is therefore next to impossible by definition. Models -and in our case product models- are an abstraction of the system they represent, re-ducing concepts of the real world to the necessary minimum. Complexity analysis on the reduced set of con-ceptual model elements can therefore be conducted down to a numerical level. Metrics for the assessment of software complexity and design quality have been proven in practice. The article gives a brief overview on complexity metrics, how to apply them to product models and possible strategies for keeping model complexity on a reasonable level. Different model standards will be analyzed, separating between logical complexity inherent to the problem domain and formal complexity imposed by the model notation. Due to the metrics presented, views on complexity can be structural, behavioral, quan-titative and even cognitive. As a conclusion, a line can be drawn between different aspects of model com-plexity and potential model acceptance.

Keywords: product model, complexity, metrics, IFC, CityGML

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Series: w78:2010 (browse)
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