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Ercoskun K, Kanoglu A

Customer relationships management in AEC sector

Abstract: Quality is the major guide for enterprises in terms of competitive strength of organizations in the information age. While globalization increases its impact throughout the world, the term “Quality” expands its meaning and the cultural and social aspects of quality becomes the most important contributors of the product quality. The customer orientation of the finished product and after sales service is becoming vital in terms of marketing. Industrialized sectors had been providing solutions in that sense under the Total Quality Management (TQM) principles since the early 80’s. For the Architecture/Engineering/Construction (AEC) sector, several managerial tools and techniques has been adapted but these partial solutions do not perform well enough as they did success in other industrialized sectors. This is probably because the need for an enterprise-wide customer orientation infrastructure is not yet proposed. This paper discusses the early concepts about a “Customer Relationships Management” (CRM) model for the AEC sector which, CRM to be the foundation for TQM; issuing that CRM is the key enabler for any tool or technique towards quality and industrialization. .

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Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by the University of Auckland. The assistance of the editor who provided the full texts and the structured metadata, Dr. Robert Amor, is gratefully appreciated.


Fadhil Che Wan Putra C W, Alshawi M

Building space analysis for integrating design and construction

Abstract: "Space analysis for a building is very important analysis whereby it can provide details of the space, i.e. room which has been analysed, including the space boundaries, space separator (including wall, ceiling or floor), total area and volume. Such information are very important whereby these parameters can be used for other applications such as calculating the heat-loss, designing a lighting system, ventilation system, air-conditioning system, etc. However, such analysis, although has been provided by several commercial packages (with some constraints), it still not yet being fully utilised by integrating with other downstream applications such as estimating, planning and site layout planning for further analysis. Therefore, a standardised building space data model need to be developed in order such integration can be achieved. Considering the importance of developing such data model for building space, several proposed generic models have been developed including RATAS Model, GSD Model, De Waard’s “House Model” and the COMBINE Integrated Data Model. However, most of the models did not fully been implemented for integrating design and construction. Such models have purposely been developed for solving a particular domain only. For example, COMBINE Integrated Data Model for HVAC application, positioning building components in architectural design in GSD Model and reasoning about building regulations in the De Waards House Model. A study have been done at the University of Salford, UK for integrating design and construction. Building space analysis has also been accommodated in this study whereby the building space has been analysed. All the parameters required for further analysis such as space boundaries, space separator and space functionality have been captured during design application and later will be integrated with other applications such as estimating, construction and site layout planning. The objectives of this paper are two-folds:- 1. to present the Building Space data model. 2. to show how the implementation of this building space model has been developed and how this implemented model has been integrated with other data models within an integrated construction environment. The paper will outlined the study on developing the building space data model and how such concepts have been implemented and developed in an integrated construction environment."

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Series: w78:2000 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.legal (0.017951) class.environment (0.015061) class.analysis (0.011629)
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Permission to reproduce these documents have been graciously provided by Icelandic Building Research Institute. The assistance of the editor, Mr. Gudni Gudnason, is gratefully appreciated


FI Stahl

Initial Graphics Exchange Specification: Architecture-Engineering-Construction Applications and Extensions

Abstract: The Initial Graphics Exchange Specification (IGES) now is supported by most principal vendors of computer-aided design (CAD) systems. Commercial data translators implemented under IGES Version 1.0 have demonstrated their ability to exchange descriptions of relatively small-scale products, most notably discrete machine parts, between CAD systems of diverse manufacture. However, the ability of IGES-based data exchange translators to transfer complexity characteristics of even simple architectural or construction engineering descriptions has yet to be demonstrated. Transfer of underlying geometric models and "intelligence," and also of nongeometric property data of various kinds, are central areas of concern. Also important is the need for project description data to be exchanged between CAD systems on which building geometries are established, and analysis systems by which these geometries are rigorously evaluated.

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Series: w78:1984 (browse)
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G. Brewer, T. Gajendran & C. Beard

Influences on the adoption of BPM/BIM: an Australian perspective

Abstract: BPM/BIM offer the possibility of faster, more accurate collaborative working thereby offering a solution to many current construction industry challenges, yet their usage remains frustratingly limited. It follows that there are likely be a number of influences and the aim of this research was therefore to identify those that could be considered relevant to the Australian construction industry. It first modeled candidate inhibitors identified from the literature, applying this to a single ‘critical case’ study project. Interviews undertaken with six key stakeholders were triangulated with two industry experts. Coding and abstraction of the data largely confirmed the efficacy of the model, which was subsequently found to be congruent with Brewer’s model of Innovation & Attitude (Brewer 2008) after qualitative meta-analysis was conducted.

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Series: w78:2009 (browse)
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Ghanbari A, Froese T

Product modeling for construction management

Abstract: With the ever-increasing use of computer technologies for managing the information involved in business processes, information standardization has been identified as an important step towards improving the efficiency and effectiveness of these processes. Over the past two decades, many research and development projects have worked towards standardizing existing information in the architecture, engineering, and construction (AEC) industry. Many information models at different levels have been proposed and many prototypes have been developed. The major part of this effort has focused on modeling product information in AEC projects (as opposed to process, organizational, or other project information), and has concentrated on the designer's perspective. Our interest, however, is from the perspective of project managers. Although project management introduces a spectrum of process information that governs the act of constructing a project, the product information that describes the facility itself is still central. Yet this product information is not explicitly represented in existing project management software such as estimating and scheduling software. This paper outlines the dimensions of a research project aimed at product modeling for project management. It discusses some of the specific requirements of product models for the purpose of supporting project management functionality. The paper also describes a framework that has been devised for categorizing project management functions.

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Full text: content.pdf (153,603 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:1999 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.represent (0.039791) class.commerce (0.013965) class.software development (0.013423)
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Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by the Research Press of the National Research Council of Canada. The support of the editors, particularly Dr. Dana Vanier, is gratefully appreciated.


Gonzales A, Ogunlana S, Soegaard B

Technology Impact Grid A Model for Strategic IT Planning for Competitive Advantage in Construction

Abstract: The dearth of information on successful cases of strategic use of information technology (IT) in the construction industry is the motivation for an investigation of the use and impact of IT in the construction industries of Spain, France and the United Kingdom. IT has yet to saturate the construction industry. Case studies of six firms in the three European countries which have the experience of using IT in a systematic manner revealed that firms can and do gain competitive advantage and improved business performance from using IT even though there are no explicit policies to gain advantage from IT. The Technology Impact Grid (TIG) was developed from the study. The grid uses two variables, degree of necessity and competitive advantage, to separate current IT into four groups: unwanted necessity, unnecessary investment, blessed potential and strategic treasure. It can be used both as a model for a firm ' s IT position evaluation and as a tool for planning IT acquisition to gain competitive advantage.

Keywords: competitive advantage; IT planning; IT position evaluation; technology impact grid; strategic planning

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Series: w78:1993 (browse)
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Permission to reproduce these papers has been graciously provided by the National University of Singapore. The assistance of the editors, particularly Prof. Martin Betts, is gratefully appreciated.


Graham Brewer, Thayaparan Gajendran

A Case Study of the Effects of Attitude, Behaviour, and Project Team Culture on Building Information Model use in a Temporary Project Organisation

Abstract: It has been established that in the construction industry maximal benefit from ICT investments can best be achieved where they are used collaboratively, in a project setting, using business processes that span the boundaries of individual firms. It can be argued that this has its ultimate expression in the building information model when it is utilised from the earliest stages of project feasibility, through the design and construction phases and beyond, yet it is all too commonly reported that this rarely eventuates. This state of affairs has less to do with technology issues as much as human relationships. Recent research has found evidence that diverse influences on the formation of individual attitudes result in boundedly rational decision-making behaviour, which has a significant effect on the likelihood of ICT integration. Parallel research has linked the effect of individual attitudes on the formation of project team culture and it's receptiveness to ICT integration. This paper presents preliminary results from a detailed case study that employers both frameworks of analysis to reveal the link between the individual attitude formation of key project personalities, their subsequent ICT decision-making behaviour, resulting in the formation of a differentiated project team culture, and sub optimal BIM performance.

Keywords: BIM, attitudes, behaviours, project team culture, TPO.

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Series: w78:2010 (browse)
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H Deshpande, H Leslie

A STRATEGY TO DEVELOP A FRAMEWORK FOR DISTRIBUTED INFORMATION MANAGEMENT IN THE AEC-FM INDUSTRY

Abstract: This paper reviews and analyses the problem of distributed decision-making in the Architecture, Engineering and Construction and Facility Management (AEC-FM) industry and at the operation and management of a supporting information system. These problems include uncoordinated information gathering, reporting and management, as well as multiple redrawing and re-keying of information, which lead to unnecessary costs, increased errors, and misunderstanding. While major advances have been made since CIDA articulated these problems fifteen years ago, particularly in relation to the Building Information Modelling (BIM), its call for easy access to standardized information relevant to each industry sector is yet to be fully answered. While individual industry sectors and organisations have made significant advances in their respective areas of concern, significantly less progress has been made when it comes to the access and exchange of information between sectors or over the life-cycle of a facility. In order to advance the agenda, this paper first takes a comprehensive look at the way the project decision-makers access, process and exchange information, and at how that data is managed over space and time. The paper then describes a strategy to develop a framework for an integrated system for information management that is comprehensive and well integrated, addressing the needs of all sectors of the industry and all phases of the facility life-cycle. The strategy also makes it possible to bring together all the diverse developments such as BIM, IFCs, IDEF, IFD, in the framework, thus helping to manage the information in all its myriad aspects. As many of the concepts raised here are similar to but slightly different from those in current circulation, the paper identifies and describes a number of key concepts used to formulate the strategy. The paper describes the proposed system in functional terms and outlines the simple demonstration packages within it that illustrate the wider picture and provide a context within which individual interest groups can act.

Keywords: Distributed information management, Performance-based project data, Product/Process data management. BIM

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Series: w78:2011 (browse)
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Hamouda M J

Developing structural programs using spread sheet based software

Abstract: During last decade, computer processing has been exceedingly replacing manual calculations in performing structural analysis and design. Proprietary software gained great popularity because of their reliability and the saving they achieve and has covered a large area in designlanalysis work requirement. Yet, a number of structural tasks is still uncovered and requires customized software that should be developed to the specific requirement of users who are - in majority - structural engineers (not necessarily specialized in computer programming). For those users who need to develop customized programs to address the areas uncovered by readily available proprietary software, SPREAD SHEET BASED SOFTWARE offers a suitable base. In this paper, the term SSBS will mean a proprietary software based on spread sheet format which can be used as a media to develop customized programs to serve specific engineering requirements. As examples to that are the LOTUS 1-2-3 and the MS EXCEL.

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Hensen J L M, Clarke J A

Integrated simulation for building design: an example state-of-the-art system

Abstract: "Most design practitioners will be aware of the emerging building simulation technologies and its benefits in terms of environmental performance assessment of building designs. As yet, few practitioners are able to claim expertise in the application of building performance simulation. This situation is poised to change with the advent of: performance based standards; societies dedicated to the effective deployment of simulation - such as the International Building Performace Simulation Association (IBPSA); appropriate training and continuing education; and the growth in small-to-medium sized practices offering simulation-based services. This paper attempts to outline the current state-of-the-art in integrated building performance simulation as a design tool. The ESP-r system (http://www.strath.ac.uk/Departments/ESRU) is used as an example where integrated simulation is a core philosophy behind the development. The current state and future developments are illustrated with examples. The importance of interoperability between simulation modules is discussed in the area of air flow, multiimensional conduction, lighting, CFD, and electrical power flow modelling. The use of integrated performance simulation for reducing the environmental impact of buildings is illustrated by a contemporary case study regarding the design of a high profile, low energy demonstration building. The design incorporates a range of energy demand reduction measures, as well as various embedded renewable energy supply systems. Finally, the paper will argue that for building simulation to penetrate the design profession in the near future, there is a need for appropriate training and professional technology transfer initiatives."

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Full text: content.pdf (721,713 bytes) (available to registered users only)

Series: w78:2000 (browse)
Cluster: papers of the same cluster (result of machine made clusters)
Class: class.environment (0.023588) class.impact (0.022970) class.education (0.022056)
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Permission to reproduce these documents have been graciously provided by Icelandic Building Research Institute. The assistance of the editor, Mr. Gudni Gudnason, is gratefully appreciated


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